space

February 2002
By Robert K. Ackerman

In with the new does not necessarily mean out with the old.

The U.S. Defense Department’s new generation of military communications satellites will be both forward-looking and backward compatible. They will introduce state-of-the-art capabilities with flexibility for upgrades, and they will be able to interoperate seamlessly with existing Milstar satellites.

February 2002
By Robert K. Ackerman

The fourth domain is becoming an arena of operations in its own right.

Military space activities increasingly are resembling their more terrestrial counterparts as their presence grows in military operations. The aboveworldly realm now has its own specific communications networks, surveillance and reconnaissance sensors and even weather reports. Soon, it may feature new reusable transport systems and weapons designed to maintain supremacy in the highest frontier.

February 2003
By Robert K. Ackerman

February 2002
By Robert K. Ackerman

In with the new does not necessarily mean out with the old.

The U.S. Defense Department’s new generation of military communications satellites will be both forward-looking and backward compatible. They will introduce state-of-the-art capabilities with flexibility for upgrades, and they will be able to interoperate seamlessly with existing Milstar satellites.

January 2004
By Gen. Lance W. Lord, USAF

Space systems are a vanguard for the new network-centric force.

January 2004
By Robert K. Ackerman

 

TacSat-1 is designed to permit tactical air or ground users to control the satellite through the secret Internet protocol router network, or SIPRNET.

A joint concept orbiter may show the way for tactical surveillance orbiters.

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