Event Coverage

November 3, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman

Tasked with patrolling millions of square miles of water over vast ocean distances, the U.S. Coast Guard is looking to augment its surveillance forces with unmanned air vehicles (UAVs). These craft would serve to alert cutters to what lies over the distant ocean horizon. Rear Adm. Charles W. Ray, USCG, the commander of the 14th Coast Guard District, told the final breakfast audience at TechNet Asia-Pacific 2011 how the vast area of responsibility across the Pacific Ocean tasks Coast Guard operations. Many isolated islands and atolls are U.S. territory, and their fish-rich waters constitute more than a million square miles of U.S. exclusive economic zones.

November 3, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman

The new technologies that are enabling elements of the critical infrastructure to operate more efficiently also are making them more vulnerable to devastating cyberattacks. Advanced mobile connectivity and supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems have created fertile ground for cybermarauders to target key aspects of the infrastructure a number of ways. These were the findings of a panel comprising a number of experts from Hawaii and the U.S. Pacific Command (PACOM) at TechNet Asia-Pacific 2011 in Honolulu. Rear Adm. Paul Becker, USN, the PACOM J-2, described how the use of SCADA industrial control systems was a primary threat to the infrastructure.

November 3, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman

Situational awareness that borders on command and control (C2) may be necessary to protect vulnerable networks in the nation's critical infrastructure. The threat to these increasingly complex industrial control systems will require more than just commercial off-the-shelf security solutions, according to a panel of experts at TechNet Asia-Pacific 2011 in Honolulu. Rear Adm. Paul Becker, USN, the U.S. Pacific Command (PACOM) J-2, warned that the proliferation of control systems, coupled with a lack of network situational awareness, are prime opportunities for cybermarauders.

November 3, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman

Building and operating the third version of the Global Information Grid-GIG 3.0-will require new forms of accountability both for security and for operation. Accordingly, identity and access management will be the key items as the next-generation defense network is developed, said a panel of defense networking experts at TechNet Asia-Pacific 2011. GIG 3.0 would tap existing technology to provide better information sharing-particularly for interservice, interagency and international coalitions-along with improved cyber security and responsiveness, offered panel moderator Randy Cieslak, U.S. Pacific Command (PACOM) chief information officer (CIO).

November 3, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman

The third iteration of the Defense Department's Global Information Grid (GIG 3.0) may represent a breakthrough in networking capabilities, but only current technologies need apply to build it, according to a Defense Department official. Mark Loepker, acting director for the Defense Information Assurance Program, told a panel audience at TechNet Asia-Pacific 2011 that industry should bring innovative solutions to the GIG table-only, a solution that is not supported by current technology is not a solution.

November 2, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman

The spread of mobile networking systems along with the use of social media have opened new backdoors for hackers with potentially serious consequences, according to a leading security expert speaking at TechNet Asia-Pacific 2011. Tom Reilly, vice president and general manager, HP Enterprise Security, told the Wednesday breakfast audience that this major information technology transformation is leading to an escalation of attacks, especially against applications, and cyberspace will be a more dangerous place as a result. "Things are going to be much uglier in the cybercrime world," Reilly declared. He added that our adversaries are evolving away from traditional marauders. Many of them now are working at the behest of nation states.

November 2, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman

Building network security around firewalls is passé, as cybercriminals are employing innovative means to enter a network. Instead, security managers should concentrate on understanding the user, the application and the data, according to Tom Reilly, vice president and general manager, HP Enterprise Security. Speaking at the TechNet Asia-Pacific 2011 Wednesday breakfast, Reilly described how new types of networking are rendering old measures obsolete. Traditionally, experts have looked at security as being a 100-percent solution that is layer focused. With the advent of mobile and cloud computing, perimeters are devolving and consumers want more access to information.

November 2, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman

As social media permeates deeper into military organizations, leaders are confronting a host of challenges. However, those challenges largely are new incarnations of longstanding problems that have faced military communicators for generations. A panel of experts at TechNet Asia-Pacific 2011 focused on how information sharing can exist within an information security environment. Many of their concerns proved to be more user-oriented than technology-based. Addressing those concerns, Master Sgt. Andrew Baker, USA, 516th Signal Brigade, said that forces need to be more operations-security (OPSEC) oriented with new media.

November 1, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman

The United States should start pursuing some of the people who are hacking into U.S. systems and stealing intellectual property, said the former commander of the U.S. Pacific Command. Adm. Timothy J. Keating, USN (Ret.), told the audience at the opening keynote address for TechNet Asia-Pacific 2011 in Honolulu, Hawaii, that going after cybermarauders may be the only way to reduce their activities. The admiral called for a "thorough review of our nation's policy" with an eye toward taking action against cyberintruders. Saying it's time to "let the Genie out of the bottle," Adm.

August 25, 2011
By Rita Boland

U.S. military and industry must embrace change and the speed of technology's transitions to remain relevant domestically and on the world stage, according to remarks by John Chambers, chairman and chief executive officer of Cisco, during LandWarNet. If the nation fails to grow productivity by 3 percent to 5 percent over the next several years it will not keep pace with Asian counterparts nor retain current standards of living, he added. The information age is now the past as everything people use becomes part of the network. Chambers stated that many actions also must change such as providing access to experts instead of information and emphasizing communities rather than individuals. "Collaboration is no longer optional," he said.

August 24, 2011
By Rita Boland

The generals who lead the U.S. Army's cyber force are responding to a diminishing budget believe that changes to its architecture already under way will not only save money but also greatly increase military cybersecurity. Among the first advances are the introduction of servicewide enterprise email-a move that will save the service an estimated $500 million-and the introduction of secure computer tablets that accept CACs and allows individuals access to the data they need. Lt. Gen. Susan S.

August 24, 2011
By Rita Boland

Teri Takai, the chief information officer (CIO) of the U.S. Defense Department, elucidated the roles of her agency this morning at LandWarNet, explaining that her duties include looking for efficiencies across the department, leading the way for effective spectrum allocation and working with international partners to create standards. Moving forward, the CIO will separate from the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Networks and Information Integration to become its own entity. Takai emphasized the need for an integrated look at technology, not a service by service or combatant command by combatant command approach, later remarking on the importance of standardized environments to effective military operations.

August 25, 2011
By Rita Boland

"At the end of the day, it's all about effects," Lt. Gen. Carroll Pollett, USA, director, Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA), said during his LandWarNet address this morning. Focusing his remarks on the enterprise, the general emphasized the need for partnerships to enable success on the battlefield and other world situations. Moving forward, enterprise leaders and users will have several issues to address, including how to leverage the classified and unclassified domains to create a common operational picture. The need for warzone advantages are unlikely to diminish. "I think in the future we're going to be in persistent conflict," Gen. Pollett stated.

August 25, 2011
By Rita Boland

The U.S Army Cyber Command/2nd Army has been in operation for less than a year, but already it is building the cyber Army of 2020, with several clear-cut views on future operations. Lt. Gen. Rhett Hernandez, USA, the commanding general, explained during LandWarNet that his organization coordinates the Army's information operations and serves as its cyber proponent. In addition to high-level activities, the command is growing its subordinate cyber brigade which will serve as the operational arm of the Army's cyber mission. Over the past 10 months personnel at the command have celebrated several successes including starting to develop a strategic plan for Army Cyber 2020. Gen.

August 24, 2011
By Henry Kenyon

LandWarNet 2011 took on a naval twist this morning as Adm. William McRaven, USN, commander, U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM), took the stage to discuss his view of communications. The leader quickly pointed out the relevance of SOCOM at a largely U.S Army conference, explaining that members of his command are inherently joint and interagency. He then cleared up any confusion that special operations are always kinetic by emphasizing that engagement activities are a critical part of missions. Adm. McRaven also said that SOF warriors represent a major value to the country. "I like to think we're the most cost effective capability the U.S. government has out there," he stated.

August 23, 2011
By Rita Boland
August 23, 2011
By Rita Boland
August 23, 2011
By Rita Boland

Lt. Gen. Susan S. Lawrence, USA, chief information officer/G-6, opened LandWarNet 2011, by promising that every one of the 453 vendors at the conference will be visited by a member of her senior team. They will fill out surveys describing the technologies they saw, which she will review, and she encourage all attendees also to contribute their insights about solutions that can address the Army's challenges by filling out the surveys. Gen. Lawrence introduced Maj. Gen. Alan R. Lynn, USA, Chief of Signal, Fort Gordon, who described some of the changes that are on the way, including the use of avatars to track each soldier as he or she enters the Army.

August 19, 2011
By Max Cacas

There's a first time for everything. On the final day of the DISA Customer and Industry Forum 2011, a first-ever panel of the chief information officers from the four branches of the military provided industry representatives with a look at the challenges they face in providing enhanced digital technologies to the warfighter.

Pentagon CIO Teri Takai she began the panel by asking LTG Susan Lawrence, USA, chief information officer G-6 with the Army, to offer an update on the Army's migration to enterprise email. That migration was delayed this past Spring as Army IT dealt with unanticipated technical problems with the migration.

August 18, 2011
By Max Cacas

John Chambers, CEO of internet router manufacturer CISCO, told the DISA Customer and Industry Forum in Baltimore yesterday that "Collaboration will be the productivity tool of the next decade." Generally, its tough to anticipate what challenges and opportunities will present themselves five years from now, he continued.

Several years ago, for example, his company designed and built one of the first routers capable of handling one million telephone calls per second. In the first year, they sold only seven, with many people wondering what you would use such a device for. Five years later, he said, they had sold over 5,000.

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