• The Mission Enabling Technologies Demonstrator manned vehicle can operate two unmanned platforms to make contact with the enemy before soldiers do, while achieving overmatch against future operating environment threats. The Army’s vision includes three robotic vehicle variants—light, medium and large, but service officials have decided for now to cancel the acquisition of a medium variant. U.S. Army photo by Jerome Aliotta/Released 
     The Mission Enabling Technologies Demonstrator manned vehicle can operate two unmanned platforms to make contact with the enemy before soldiers do, while achieving overmatch against future operating environment threats. The Army’s vision includes three robotic vehicle variants—light, medium and large, but service officials have decided for now to cancel the acquisition of a medium variant. U.S. Army photo by Jerome Aliotta/Released 

Army Cancels Robotic Vehicle Acquisition Phase

January 16, 2020


Service leaders say they will restart the program with new requirements.


The U.S. Army announced today that it has canceled the solicitation for the Section 804 Middle Tier Acquisition (MTA) Rapid Prototyping phase of the Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle (OMFV). Based on feedback and proposals received from industry, the Army has determined it is necessary to revisit the requirements, acquisition strategy and schedule before moving forward. 

"We remain committed to the OMFV program as it is our second-highest modernization priority, and the need for this ground combat vehicle capability is real. It is imperative we get it right for our soldiers," Dr. Bruce Jette, assistant secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology, says in a written announcement. 

The OMFV program focuses on delivering an essentially new capability to armored brigade combat teams under a significantly reduced timeline compared to traditional acquisition efforts, the written notice adds. 

"The Army asked for a great deal of capability on a very aggressive schedule," Jette says. "Despite an unprecedented number of industry days and engagements, to include a draft request for proposal over the course of nearly two years—all of which allowed industry to help shape this competition—it is clear a combination of requirements and schedule overwhelmed industry's ability to respond within the Army's timeline."

The notice stresses that the program remains a critical capability for the Army.

"The most prudent means of ensuring long-term programmatic success is to get this multibillion-dollar effort correct," adds Gen. John M. Murray, commander of Army Futures Command. "We are going to take what we have learned and apply it to the OMFV program to develop our path and build a healthy level of competition back into the program." 

The Army plans to revise and re-solicit the OMFV requirements on a competitive basis.

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