The Cyber Edge Home Page

  • Michael Moss, deputy director of the Cyber Threat Intelligence Integration Center (CTIIC), Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), told Congress that CTIIC remains concerned by the "increasingly damaging effects of cyber operations and the apparent acceptance by adversaries of collateral damage." Credit: Shutterstock/EVorona
     Michael Moss, deputy director of the Cyber Threat Intelligence Integration Center (CTIIC), Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), told Congress that CTIIC remains concerned by the "increasingly damaging effects of cyber operations and the apparent acceptance by adversaries of collateral damage." Credit: Shutterstock/EVorona

Cyber Threat Intelligence Leader Warns of Changing Nature of Attacks

The Cyber Edge
August 30, 2018
Posted by Kimberly Underwood
E-mail About the Author

Adversaries are becoming even more assertive and capable of using cyberspace to threaten the United States, says the deputy director of the Cyber Threat Intelligence Integration Center.


As billions more Internet of Things (IoT)-related devices come online, the barrage of cyber threats will not only continue but will target users in new ways. Moreover, the number of adversaries mounting attacks against the United States in cyberspace will continue to grow in the next year, as nation-states, terrorist groups, criminal organizations and others persist in the development of cyber warfare capabilities, Michael Moss, deputy director, Cyber Threat Intelligence Integration Center (CTIIC) warned during recent Congressional testimony.

Appearing before the Senate Committee on the Judiciary's Subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism, Moss raised continued concerns about how adversaries ­will continue to leverage cyber-based operations as a low-cost tool for cyber attacks.

The deputy director expects Russia, China, Iran, and North Korea to pose the greatest cyber threat to American interests in the next year.

“The risk is growing that some adversaries will conduct cyber attacks—such as data deletion or localized and temporary disruptions of critical infrastructure—against the United States in a crisis short of war,” Moss said. “We believe they will work to use cyber operations to achieve strategic objectives unless they face clear repercussions for their cyber operations.”

Moss anticipates non-state actors to continue cyber-based financial crime, propaganda and messaging. “Our adversaries are becoming more assertive, more capable and more adept at using cyberspace to threaten our interests,” he noted.

Moss stressed that the additional digital devices connecting to the IoT have relatively little built-in security, giving an opening to emboldened nation-states and malignant actors. In addition, while the use of artificial intelligence and IoT has added convenience into daily life and to the management of critical infrastructure, the technologies also present significant risk, he noted. “The potential for surprise in the cyber realm will increase in the next year and beyond,” he stated.

As part of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), CTIIC is charged with building a coordinated understanding of the cyber threats to the United States and its national interests, according to ODNI. CTIIC was authorized by Congress’ Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016—with further enumeration from a Presidential policy directive—and is one of three federal government leads, in addition to the DHS and FBI, responsible for coordinating the government’s response to significant cyber incidents, the ODNI stated.

Enjoyed this article? SUBSCRIBE NOW to keep the content flowing.


Share Your Thoughts:

Its great informations is shared....i would like to request you to see the below ...by attending the webinar they are giving CPE credits...we should link our Signal webinars to get CPE credits..

Cyber Threat Intelligence Sharing in Government
“The government doesn’t have a monopoly on threat intelligence in this space.” That’s what Tonya Uggoretz, the director of the cyber threat intelligence integration center, said quite profoundly back in April.

https://goto. webcasts.com/ starthere.jsp?ei=1208579&tp_key=a37b794233&sti=email&utm_campaign=Sponsored%20Content%202018%20-%20Anomali&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=65584074&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-_WzP4ceRc-_9fjzO_yT17d8vrPTEKm19mRBcz-ibGS3mXb_VRSgUD0tm3p6B_3EW-0vgIqz_Luz64qXa63YDbPvUzSag&_hsmi=65584074

Thanks for your comment, Venkata, and the link to the webcast. I appreciate your feedback.

As for CPE credits, AFCEA International's conference events do give continuing education credits. In fact it is quite a robust program, with credits at TechNet Asia-Pacific, INSS, MILCOM, TechNet Augusta, among others. Please visit: https://www.afcea.org/site/education/continuing-education-credits for more information.

As for the webinars, they feature a quick view from industry leaders on trends and technologies and are not necessarily set up to meet the formal standards for continuing education. I know I learn something every time I tune into one, and I hope you'll continue to find them informative, even without the CPE credits.

Kimberly,

Considering your field of study, you might find my website to be of interest.

agsaf. org (Artificially Generated Stampede Awareness Foundation)

Any questions or thoughts, don't hesitate to give me a ring.

Eric Saferstein
Pittsburgh, PA

agsaf. org

 

Eric, thanks for reaching out. I looked at your website and found it interesting. I had not thought of human stampedes as such a risk or as a possible target of information warfare. While I am not sure about stadium communication policies, I do know that the government, including police departments, do send text alerts, and I know of several companies that are working to design public communication warnings via text and other methods, which could apply to people in stadiums.

Given increased threats, I do agree that citizens need to be protected. Good luck in your efforts.

p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 14.0px Calibri}

Share Your Thoughts: