Cyber

June 14, 2021
 
Credit: ZinetroN/Shutterstock

A delayed focus on IT modernization could create a gap between frequent high-impact cyber breaches and the U.S. Department of the Navy’s preparedness to address them. From the SolarWinds hack to ransomware, new cyber threats emerge almost weekly. Advances in technology to help defend against such threats occur so quickly that current acquisition and infrastructure programs cannot keep pace.

June 2, 2021
By Chris Souza
Cybersecurity grows more complex with the Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification. Effective compliance begins with effective leadership. Credit: fizkes/Shutterstock

There’s little doubt that thanks to the influx of new government regulations around privacy and data security, requirements have become the primary area of focus for many defense industrial base and General Services Administration contractors.

June 1, 2021
By Mark Spangler
 Cyber program managers must review their plans to respond to today’s evolving threat environment.  Shutterstock

Cybersecurity program managers are facing the dilemma of appropriately balancing compliance with threat tracking and mitigation. Today, amidst the ever-growing problem of data breaches, organizations are investing in protection. But simply complying with security and privacy standards seldom means systems and data are automatically secure.

March 3, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
Leaders discuss cyber workforce disparities during the AFCEATechNet Indo-Pacific conference on March 3.

The 35th annual AFCEA TechNet Indo-Pacific conference featured a panel with top female leaders addressing cybersecurity workforce issues. Having ever-present cybersecurity training, reaching a younger audience on their level and leveraging women who may be seeking a second career are all ways to close the cybersecurity workforce gaps, the leaders said.

June 1, 2021
By George I. Seffers
Using virtual reality, soldiers from Fort Sill, Oklahoma, get a look at components of the Army’s new prototype Long Range Hypersonic Weapon and a chance to influence how the system is designed. In the future, units may use 3D printers to build their own virtual reality headsets.  U.S. Army

The personnel within the Realities Lab at the Army Cyber Institute located at West Point explore every aspect of extended reality technologies, developing new tools, conducting studies and asking the hard questions.

The Realities Lab is dedicated to research in what is becoming known as extended reality, or XR, a term that includes augmented, virtual and mixed reality. Extended reality technologies offer a wide range of military uses, including realistic training available virtually anywhere, modeling and simulation for weapon system development, and actual situational awareness on the battlefield.

June 1, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
In its pursuit of open architecture solutions, the U.S. Navy has made “great strides” in applying the Mission Computer Alternative (MCA) platform, which is a Hardware Open Systems Technologies- (HOST-) conforming mission computer. The service is currently testing the MCA/HOST platform in its E-2D Advanced Hawkeye tactical airborne early warning aircraft and in its T-45 training aircraft (above)—and is considering how to advance the solutions to other platforms.  U.S. Navy photo

The U.S. military is using open architecture platforms on a greater scale, deploying interchangeable hardware and software systems to its major weapon programs. In particular, the Navy’s Naval Air Systems Command, known as NAVAIR, and its Program Executive Office, Aviation Common Systems and Commercial Services, are increasingly using flexible “systems of systems” in many of its major aviation programs. The application of open architecture is allowing the Navy—and the Defense Department—to consolidate common resources, decrease risk, reuse software, enhance maintenance abilities, reduce costs and increase tactical options.

June 1, 2021
By Shaun Waterman

As the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) drives forward on its cloud strategy, development teams and chief information officers alike are looking for faster ways to deploy new capabilities, proactively address cybersecurity challenges and take advantage of the resiliency of cloud operations.

The DoD has embraced the cloud to achieve speed, security and scale. The focus is now on clearing the blockers that have slowed deployment in order to accelerate the adoption of new services and unlock the transformational capabilities of cloud for the DoD enterprise and warfighters at the tactical edge.      

June 1, 2021
By Henry S. Kenyon

As the Department of Defense migrates more mission-critical systems and software to cloud environments, it must also consider an innovative way for securing this new environment from potential cyber attack.

It is up to DoD organizations like the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) to work out the details of such efforts and ensure the military’s considerable inventory of legacy equipment and systems can continue to interoperate smoothly with the latest technologies. But integrating different technologies is never an easy process.

May 27, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
Gen. Paul Nakasone, USA, commander, U.S. Cyber Command; director, National Security Agency; and chief, Central Security Service, pictured speaking in 2019 with cyber soldiers assigned Fort Meade, expects an increase in the number of cyber teams deployed at the request of foreign governments to help defend against cyber marauders. Credit: Steven Stover, 780th Military Intelligence Brigade (Cyber)

The U.S. Cyber Command, at the invitation of foreign governments, sends teams of cyber warriors overseas to aid in the search for, analysis of and protection against adversaries conducting cyber warfare.

While U.S. forces frequently deploy overseas, this is a different kind of military support. Instead of taking tanks, helicopters and ships, the U.S. military sends its cyber warriors, armed with their adroit offensive and defensive skills and digital tools.

May 25, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
Operating for just about 7 months, the Analysis and Resilience Center for Systemic Risk, or ARC, has a unique role in helping to protect industry-owned assets that have implications to national security if attacked by cybermauraders. Credit: Shutterstock/xtock

Stood up last October—the Analysis and Resilience Center for Systemic Risk (ARC), a nonprofit, Arlington-Virginia-based organization—helps to protect the nation’s infrastructure by assessing the endemic cybersecurity risks to the critical energy, financial and other private sectors. A 2013 executive order identified some assets—on which the U.S. government relies but reside in the private sector—that if compromised by cyber attack could have a catastrophic impact on national security.

May 24, 2021
 
Cyber adversaries are creating a “wild west” environment in cyberspace where organizations must be aware of their security to protect themselves, said Gene Yoo, CEO of Resecurity Inc. Credit: Shutterstock

Recent cyber attacks against critical infrastructure such as the attack on Colonial Pipeline Co. has put cybersecurity in the spotlight.

But combating cyber adversaries is a broad area requiring significant amounts of human intelligence and a deep technical expertise to identify them, Gene Yoo, CEO of Resecurity Inc., told SIGNAL Magazine Editor-in-Chief Robert K. Ackerman during a SIGNAL Media Executive Video interview.

Adversaries come in different types, he added, noting that these range from part-time hacktivists to skilled professionals working for criminal organizations or state intelligence agencies.

May 19, 2021
By Robert K. Ackerman
 Credit: metamorworks/Shutterstock

Cyber education and training should begin not in college, not in secondary school, not in middle school, not in elementary school, but at home as soon as children are able to view or use social media, say some experts. This training is important not just to lay the groundwork for future cybersecurity professionals in a field starved for expertise, but also to instill good cyber hygiene habits that can be passed on to other family members.

By Kimberly Underwood
The 67th Cyberspace Wing of the U.S. Air Force is examining the concept of software factory-as-a-service that could aid in cyber space operations, reports Wing Commander Col. Jeffrey Phillips, USAF.

The U.S. Air Force’s 67th Cyberspace Wing has been busy. The wing operationally acts as the execution arm of Air Forces Cyber, performing comprehensive cyber operations on a service and nation level. The wing has successfully proven its ability to operationalize on top of its duties to organize, train and equip, reported Col. Jeffrey Phillips, USAF, wing commander. The wing took action against Russia’s information warfare campaign over the last year, responded to the SolarWinds compromise and helped ensure the digital security of the 2020 election, Col. Phillips said during a May 18 presentation to the AFCEA Alamo Chapter.

May 19, 2021
 
Cloud-based security architectures can help federal agencies protect their infrastructure and manage change as it occurs, says Sean Frazier, federal chief security officer at Okta Inc. Credit: Shutterstock

As more federal agencies and businesses move to the cloud, managing their security needs in this new environment becomes critical. One way to do this is to implement zero-trust architectures as part of an identity cloud environment, said Sean Frazier, federal chief security officer at Okta Inc.

Zero-trust architecture, where it is assumed that the network is or will be compromised, is the latest phase of security development. This is important as the Defense Department modernizes its cloud-based systems under constant pressure from foreign cyber attacks.

May 18, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
The Army’s Cyber Center of Excellence (CCoE) at Fort Gordon, Georgia, is creating a new pilot program to allow soldiers to access training before deploying, when they are at their units or when they find they are lacking in a skill. It will also let managers know in which areas a soldier is strong, says incoming Command Chief Warrant Officer (CWO) at the CCoE, CWO 5 Paul Sankey, USA.

The U.S. Army is creating a pilot program for a limited number of Signal Warrant Officers to build certain skills that the service is identifying as being crucial for the future digital battlefield. The program, currently being developed by the Army’s Cyber Center of Excellence (CCoE) at Fort Gordon, Georgia, will feature an online training platform for soldiers to access on-demand education when needed to support future signal, cyber and electronic warfare operations.

May 18, 2021
By Robert K. Ackerman
Lt. Gen. Stephen G. Fogarty, USA, commander, U.S. Army Cyber Command, delivers the opening keynote in Episode Three of the TechNet Augusta Virtual Solutions Series.

The U.S. Army is girding for battle in cyberspace by assembling a skilled force that it hopes will make the difference in the event of a conflict, its cyber commander stated. This force aims to be the decisive factor in any conflict in that domain.

The Army cyber workforce was the focus of the opening session for episode three of the TechNet Augusta Virtual Solutions Series, being held May 18-19. Delivering the opening keynote was Lt. Gen. Stephen G. Fogarty, USA, commander, U.S. Army Cyber Command, who wasted no words in describing the importance of the human factor in cyber operations.

May 18, 2021
By George I. Seffers
STEM education is a vital part of attracting a cyber-savvy workforce for civil and military service. Credit: Somjai Jathieng/Shutterstock

Every cyber warrior can be a cyber recruiter, according to panelists at the AFCEA TechNet Augusta Virtual Event Series.
 
The United States faces a severe shortage in cyber personnel and in students willing to enter the cyber workforce. That shortage is even more acute in the government and the military, where talented personnel are often recruited by industry for higher pay and other incentives.
 

May 13, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
Making ransom payments in cyber attacks only fuels the business model of malicious actors, warns the acting director of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, Brandon Wales, speaking to reporters on May 13.

The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, or CISA, the nation’s lead federal agency for protecting government networks and critical infrastructure against cybersecurity threats, reminded agencies and the private sector not to succumb to paying ransoms in cyber attacks and to take much greater steps to shore up any vulnerabilities. “As last week’s ransomware attack against the Colonial Pipeline and recent intrusions impacting federal agencies demonstrate, our nation faces constant cyber threats from nation states and criminal groups alike,” said Brandon Wales, CISA’s acting director in a May 13 statement. 

May 13, 2021
By Beverly Cooper
Credit: Shutterstock/insta_photos

Development of a new federal service academy, established to educate a robust digital civil servant workforce, is the recommendation of the AFCEA Cyber Committee in a recent white paper “Establishing a Federal Digital Service Academy.” In echoing the sentiments of various commissions and thought leaders over the past four years, the committee is calling on President Biden to sign an executive order and begin the process

May 13, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
The new cybersecurity executive order from the White House calls for the federal government’s increased use of multifactor authentication, encryption, endpoint detection response, breach logging, zero-trust architecture and cloud computing, according to a senior administration official. Credit: Shutterstock/Andrea Izzotti

In an effort to increase critical infrastructure cybersecurity and better protect federal networks, President Joseph Biden signed an executive order on May 12. It includes provisions to improve information sharing between industry and the U.S. government, overhaul federal cybersecurity standards, spur the further use of cloud computing and zero trust architecture, and mandate the use of multifactor authentication and encryption. Amongst other measures, the executive order establishes a Cybersecurity Safety Review Board that would dissect a significant cyber incident and make recommendations for action.

May 11, 2021
 

Coordination among allied militaries is one of the world’s oldest problems. In the future, U.S. forces will likely operate in increasingly complex environments alongside diverse multinational forces to address emerging threats. Coalition command structures will require warfighting capabilities built on interoperability and a secure environment for communication and collaboration among trusted coalition forces at operational and tactical levels.

May 1, 2021
By Kevin Tonkin
U.S. Marines assigned to the Defensive Cyberspace Operations–Internal Defensive Measures Company, 9th Communications Battalion, review network configurations in the current operations tent at Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton. The company executes defensive cyberspace operations for the Marine Corps Enterprise Network. Photo by Cpl. Cutler Brice, USMC, I Marine Expeditionary Force

The massive cyber attack on the United States via information technology vendor SolarWinds continues to send shockwaves through the departments of Defense, State and Homeland Security as well as other agencies. Damage assessments are ongoing. If the U.S. government in general and Defense Department in particular are to successfully defend against attacks by well-funded, patient and highly motivated enemies, they will need to change their approach to defending their networks and systems.

May 1, 2021
By Michael Grebb, David Nolan and Gabriel Martinez
Managing access to information systems involving data about drug overdoses, federal threats, criminal justice information, geographical information system (GIS) mapping or physical access to a crime scene is central to today’s public safety information technology environment. The Tennessee Dangerous Drug Task Force is part of a pilot program to advance federated ICAM initiatives for first responders. Credit: Shutterstock/Victor Yang

Public safety agencies are seeking ways to reliably grant mission-critical information access to authorized users while also ensuring security and data integrity. Technical pilot projects sponsored by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence and the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency demonstrated cross-domain federated identity, credential and access management for secure information sharing for first responders in Texas and Tennessee.

May 1, 2021
 
Because COVID has changed the way people, Internet of Things developers and providers need to work together to bake in security. Credit: Pixabay

Col. Karlton Johnson, USAF (Ret.), is the chairman of the Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification (CMMC) Accreditation Body board of directors.

How has COVID changed the technology picture?

May 1, 2021
By Michael Campanelli

Before 1957, man had never placed a single object in space. Soon, tens of thousands of new artificial satellites will circle the Earth. Beyond a change in the sheer volume of satellites in space, the actors at center stage today are fundamentally different: a shift from humans and hardware to software and shoebox satellites.

A new space race is dawning. Luckily, the United States has an edge against competitors like China and Russia if it can keep it.

April 28, 2021
 
Getting privileged access management right involves making sure the right security tools are in place and determining that they are easy to use and can interoperate with legacy software and systems, says Ross Johnson, director of federal sales for Thycotic Software Ltd. Credit:Shutterstock

The recent wave of high-profile cyber attacks on federal government agencies and the businesses that support them has gotten organizations thinking about security. A key part of any organization’s security strategy is access management—determining who can access certain kinds of information and resources and when and/or where they can do so.

But determining where to start can often be delayed by indecision due to over-analysis and caution, explains Ross Johnson, director of federal sales for Thycotic Software Ltd. The first and most important thing an organization can do is to make the decision to take inventory of all their data assets.

April 20, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
Leaders from the Defense Information Systems Agency and the Joint Force Headquarters Department of Defense Information Network, including Gen. Garret Yee, Gen. Paul Fredenburg and Joe Wassel, found that the close working relationship of the two organizations was crucial in responding to the SolarWinds malware attack.

Facing an unprecedented malicious cyber event, the Defense Information Systems Agency, known as DISA, and the Joint Force Headquarters Department of Defense Information Network, or JFHQ-DODIN, sprang into action, leaning on their respective round-the-clock operations, their supply chain management postures, and relying on its industry, Defense Department and government partnerships, leaders say.

April 20, 2021
 
Zero trust architecture isn’t a single architecture, nor is it a single solution that can be purchased, but an interrelated set of old and new technologies and methods working together, said Don Maclean, chief cybersecurity technologist for DLT Solutions.

Many federal government agencies are interested in improving their cybersecurity by moving to a zero trust architecture model. But such a move, while very beneficial to the organization, is a complex and involved process that requires some fundamental changes in how security and operations are approached, says Don Maclean, chief cybersecurity technologist for DLT Solutions.

Zero trust architecture is a cybersecurity concept that assumes a network is or will be compromised and takes steps to protect data at every potential point of access.

April 19, 2021
 
Industry can help the DOD with complex technology acquisition and deployment projects by providing services and expertise, said Dana Barnes, senior vice president of public sector at Palo Alto Networks. Credit: Shutterstock

Cybersecurity in the federal government, especially for the Department of Defense, is a complex dance between agencies and commercial partners. To get things right, companies working with the government need to be adaptable and resilient in helping government customers meet their mission goals, said Dana Barnes, senior vice president of public sector at Palo Alto Networks.

April 9, 2021
By Robert K. Ackerman
A communications tower for military 5G rises above a forest. Several challenges loom as the U.S. Defense Department strives to implement 5G into the force. Credit: M.Moira/Shutterstock

The revolutionary advantages offered by defense use of 5G technology could be undone if the United States doesn’t begin now to meet and overcome a set of challenges, said an expert from the National Security Agency (NSA). These challenges range from developing effective security measures to ensuring the supply chain is not contaminated by parts made by foreign adversaries.

April 6, 2021
Posted by: George I. Seffers
A newly formed industry advisory council will allow small and large businesses to provide feedback on the CMMC. Credit: Gorodenkoff/Shutterstock

The Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification Accreditation Body (CMMC-AB), the sole authoritative source for operationalizing CMMC assessments and training by the U.S. Defense Department, has announced the formation of a cybersecurity Industry Advisory Council’s (IAC).

The CMMC-AB IAC mission is to provide a unified voice as representatives of organizations seeking certification to provide to the Defense Department and the accreditation board feedback, input and recommendations for implementing the CMMC.

April 1, 2021
By George I. Seffers
With the National Institute of Standards and Technology expected next year to select quantum-resistant algorithms for encryption and for digital signatures, an NSA official warns that departments and agencies should begin preparing now to protect national security systems in the quantum era. Credit: sakkmesterke/Shutterstock

The national security community needs to prepare now for the possibility that U.S. adversaries could develop and deploy quantum computers, which would render useless most conventional encryption algorithms, says Adrian Stanger, senior cryptographic authority, Cybersecurity Directorate, National Security Agency (NSA).

April 1, 2021
 

Working from home or remotely has always been a significant challenge for our federal workforce. The obstacles are not so much technical, rather it is the sensitivity of the data and communications that must traverse the network, and the sophistication, resources and determination of the adversarial powers that seek to disrupt or compromise them.

Unlike the commercial marketplace where a security breech might result in lost revenue, stolen IP or a fine, in the federal mission space the cost of failure could be the loss of critical infrastructure or even loss of life.

April 1, 2021
By Matt Toth and Richard Chitamitre
Training sessions, such as Cyber Shield 19, provide cybersecurity analysts opportunities to train, exchange best practices and test their cyber mettle. Credit: Army Staff Sgt. George B. Davis

The nature of military permanent change of station assignments can create gaps in the U.S. Defense Department’s protected posture to cyber assets. The current approach allows valuable institutional knowledge literally to walk out the door, often being replaced with inadequately prepared personnel walking in. This practice runs contrary to the Pentagon’s stated strategic goals that aim at building and maintaining a skilled workforce rather than solely acquiring new tools.

April 1, 2021
By Miroslav Nečas
The NATO Ministers of Defence meet in February to prepare for its summit later this year. Among the topics socially distanced attendees discussed were progress on burden sharing and missions in Afghanistan and Iraq. Credit: NATO

NATO is at risk of losing its technology edge because of emerging and disruptive technologies increasingly developed within the civil sector. The growth of peer competitors’ determination, especially China, and the decline of technology education in Western countries are eroding the advantage they once skillfully held.

To address this state of affairs, the organization’s defense ministers are examining a number of activities. As a part of this initiative, the NATO Industrial Advisory Group (NIAG) conducted a study to provide the industry view of the implications of emerging and disruptive technologies (EDTs) and Chinese advances in defense operations and military capability development.

April 1, 2021
By Shaun Waterman

There is a virulent plague spreading across the globe, Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas warned earlier this year. But he wasn’t talking about COVID-19. Instead, he was referring to what he called “an epidemic that is spreading through cyberspace: ransomware.”

As Mayorkas pointed out: “Ransomware is not new. It has been around for years. What is new is the evolution of attackers’ methods ... and the increased frequency of these attacks.”

February 1, 2021
By Mark S. Sincevich
Senior Airman Rose Li, USAF (l), and Airman 1st Class Eric Gardella, USAF, 86th Communications Squadron wing cyber readiness technicians, monitor malicious network activity during exercise Tacet Venari at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, in 2020 to prepare local cyber defenders in safeguarding critical technological infrastructures. U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Devin Boyer

The federal government has been taking zero trust more seriously. Although a significant part of it has yet to be implemented, some initial work has been completed with zero trust network access, yet the outside-in approach to zero trust and complexity remains. But the more important aspect of zero trust relates to application and workload connections, which is what attackers care about and is not being protected today.

This “other side” of zero trust and a host-based micro-segmentation approach will lead to greater security and will stop the lateral movement of malware. Constituting multiple pilot projects is the best way forward in the inside-out approach to zero trust.

March 25, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
Adversaries are no longer merely launching attacks from their part of the world, says Gen. Paul Nakasone, USA, commander, U.S. Cyber Command, testifying before Congress on March 25. “They can come in the United States and use our infrastructure, and there is a blind spot for us not being able to see them,” he warns.

The last year presented “unique challenges” to the military combatant command in charge of defending U.S. related interests in cyberspace. The three-year old U.S. Cyber Command, which plans and executes global cyberspace operations, activities and missions in regard to defending and advancing national interests, has spent the last year defending and mitigating against the continuing cyber threats from China, Russia, Iran and nonstate actors and criminals, reported Gen. Paul Nakasone, USA, commander, U.S. Cyber Command (CYBERCOM); director, National Security Agency (NSA); and chief, Central Security Service (CSS); in testimony before the Senate Armed Services Committee today.

March 23, 2021
 

With ransomware and malware attacks on the rise across the globe, leaders need to be positioned for incident response before a breach occurs. Most businesses are not prepared for the earth-splitting impact a ransomware attack will present to their organization. Many organizations are deploying the “HOPE” strategy against ransomware. They hope every day that they aren’t targeted, because they know a ransomware attack will present a monumental financial and organizational challenge. Commercial businesses have paid hundreds of millions of dollars to black hat hackers for the rights to the decryption key to restore their network. Ransomware can shut down computers and lock out users until they pay hackers a ransom.

February 8, 2021
 

Federal agencies and especially the DOD are quickly embracing cloud computing for many IT requirements. Traditional computing paradigms are giving way to distributed computing that is fundamental to the dynamic and ephemeral cloud environment. At the same time, the user base is also becoming much more distributed, particularly in this era of increased remote work. Teams of globally dispersed personnel from the DOD, partner organizations and even supporting contractors are now regularly leveraging the cloud to share information critical to mission fulfillment.

March 22, 2021
By Robert K. Ackerman
Advanced hacks such as the recent Solar Winds event are pushing the limits of CMMC standards. Credit: ozrimoz/Shutterstock

Recent actions by cybermarauders have illustrated the importance of the Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification (CMMC) thrust by the Defense Department, and new assessment guides can help lay the groundwork for companies to meet CMMC requirements, according to government officials.These and other key points were presented at the AFCEA CMMC Lunch and Learn session held on March 19. The last of a series of CMMC lunch presentations, this session focused on requirements for the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). But, government experts addressed several other key issues related to CMMC implementation.

March 10, 2021
By Robert K. Ackerman
U.S. Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Charles Q. Brown, USAF, looks on in a demonstration of how to fix code in minutes as part of the Air Force's Kessel Run. The Air Force is building an information enterprise that will enable both users and shapers of data systems to access needed information from a single source. Credit: U.S Air Force

The U.S. Air Force will be flying in a different sort of cloud as it matures its information technology systems. Its Cloud One system will be at the heart of equipping everyone in the Air Force and the Space Force with access to vital information as it embraces multidomain operations.

Lauren Knausenberger, chief information officer, U.S. Air Force, described the future Air Force information environment at the AFCEA Rocky Mountain Chapter’s Rocky Mountain Cyberspace Symposium being held March 8-11 both virtually and at The Broadmoor in Colorado Springs, Colorado. She reported that many elements will need to come to pass, including better cyber training, for this new enterprise information system to realize its full potential.

March 9, 2021
By Sebastian Krueger
The Internet of Things can make operations run smoothly in any organization but only through constant monitoring of the devices that make up the IoT network. Credit: SerGRAY/Shutterstock

In the ever-growing and complexifying ecosystem of the Internet of Things (IoT), demand for connectivity is stronger than ever and only bound to intensify. Statista predicts that by 2025, there will be 38.6 billion devices connected to the internet, which will put even more pressure on organizations to monitor their infrastructures.

For system administrators, there are several obstacles to keeping pathways clear and the flow of data smooth. Here are a few of the most common roadblocks when it comes to IoT monitoring, as well as a few ways to overcome them.

Roadblock #1: Managing different interfaces for different devices

March 3, 2021
By Robert K. Ackerman
A double rainbow looms over the NSA/CSS Center in Oahu, Hawaii. The building is named after Capt. Joseph T. Rochefort, USN, whose team provided the key intelligence that helped win the 1942 Battle of Midway. The agency is looking to industry and academia for innovations vital to its changing mission. Credit: NSA/CSS

The National Security Agency/Central Security Service (NSA/CSS)-Hawaii is looking toward innovation, both in technology and in service, as it ramps up to meet the challenges posed in the region covered by the Indo-Pacific Command (INDOPACOM). And these challenges have evolved during the COVID-19 pandemic, notes the head of the office.

Capt. Kurtis Mole, USN, commander, NSA/CSS Hawaii, addressed the opportunities NSA/CSS is seizing during his keynote address on the third day of TechNet Indo-Pacific, running virtually March 1-3. Capt. Mole defined the agency’s challenges against the backdrop of the vast Indo-Pacific region while noting its applicability worldwide.

March 1, 2021
By Maryann Lawlor
China’s consolidated control its political mechanisms enables a unity of effort difficult to achieve in democracies. Credit: Shutterstock/Poring Studio

The rise of the People’s Republic China as a peer competitor vying for superpower status has emerged as an important challenge for the United States. To confront this competition, policy and decision makers must preserve and extend U.S. global interests to deter China if necessary and work in the international system in which the United States plays a vital role.

March 1, 2021
By Robert K. Ackerman
Credit: DHS

The entire nation must engage in an informed debate about cybersecurity and how to stop the damage being inflicted by adversaries through cyberspace, says the director of intelligence for the U.S. Cyber Command. Brig. Gen. Matteo Martemucci, USAF, J-2 for the U.S. Cyber Command, says this debate must explore whether the roles played in cyber defense stay the way they are or change.

March 1, 2021
By George I. Seffers
The DARPA OPS-5G program has set some ambitious goals, including adoption of the technology by a mobile carrier near a military base and machine translation of open source standards. Credit: ZinetroN/Shutterstock

If all goes as planned, a major mobile cellphone carrier will ultimately adopt technology developed under the Defense Advanced Research Project’s Agency’s Open, Programmable, Secure 5G program. Doing so will allow the open-source, secure technology to proliferate as so-called Internet of Things technologies become more ubiquitous.

March 1, 2021
By George I. Seffers
A signal support system specialist prepares a radio system used to allow soldiers and airmen to keep in constant communications with one another during their missions. Graphic illustration by Regina Ali, U.S. Defense Department

The U.S. Defense Department already is looking beyond its massive $600 million investment in 5G experiments announced in October. Plans include a second round of experiments and the potential for expanding efforts with other government agencies and with international partners.

March 1, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
One of the key challenges about 6G will be operating in ultra-high frequencies—in terahertz—and AT&T has started internal corporate development and external research at 60 U.S. universities to shape solutions for the next generation of wireless communication. Credit: Shutterstock/Den Rise

The telecommunications industry is currently rolling out the fifth-generation wireless network known as 5G, which is bringing more bandwidth, lower latency, high-speed throughput, improved reliability and increased connectivity to mobile communications. Off of that advancing communications point will come 6G, the sixth iteration of the wireless network.

March 1, 2021
By Lt. Gen. Robert M. Shea, USMC (Ret.)

People who have come of age in the information era often believe they have experienced a landmark shift in world events and lifestyles. But that which has taken place over the past 35 years pales in comparison to the existential change taking shape with the coming wireless revolution.

Understanding this coming revolution requires thinking beyond the physical devices we carry in our pockets. Hardware does not solely define what wireless connectivity is about. The capabilities will go much further than those devices, and it is these new and expanded capabilities that will prove to be the global game changers.