Technology

September 13, 2021
Posted by Kimberly Underwood
Dmitry Pushin, from the University of Waterloo’s Institute for Quantum Computing and a professor in the Canadian university’s Department of Physics and Astronomy, says that recent breakthroughs during an international research collaboration at the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) will “open the door to future technologies,” such as quantum-related capabilities. Pushin is pictured at NIST’s Center for Neutron Research in Maryland. Credit: University of Waterloo/NIST

Scientists participating in an international research effort at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, or NIST, have discovered a previously unknown component of silicon crystals and unveiled new information about a subatomic particle. In doing so, the researchers of the multi-year experiment have yielded details about the “long-theorized fifth force of nature.” The findings may enable additional breakthroughs in quantum technologies, the University of Waterloo announced in a September 10 statement.

September 1, 2021
Posted by Kimberly Underwood
The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center’s Detachment 12, otherwise known as Kessel Run, has created a powerful command and control tool called C2IMERA that will provide airmen, wing commanders and major command leaders with a real-time operational sight picture of installation resources for force projection and emergency management, amongst other mission applications. Gen. Mark Kelly, commander of the Air Combat Command (ACC) has directed its use at all of ACC’s installations. Credit: Kessel Run

The Command and Control Incident Management Emergency Response Application, or C2IMERA, software tool, created by Kessel Run, one of the U.S. Air Force’s software factories, will now be employed at all of Air Combat Command’s facilities, the Boston-based Kessel Run announced on September 1.

Gen. Mark Kelly, USAF, commander of Air Combat Command (ACC), has specified that the tool—which provides installation reporting, planning, force generation, emergency management, and command and control (C2) monitoring and execution functions—be used at all of its installations.

September 1, 2021
By Jennifer A. Miller

With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, the U.S. Defense Department entered something of a forced telework pilot situation, maximizing telework flexibility to minimize workforce health risks. Having experienced the hurdles, hiccups and Herculean adaptation across the department, I think the department did well. I also support the department implementing maximum telework policy even if COVID becomes less of a threat.

I recently contributed to a written product circulating among Army leaders concerning the Army’s telework situation pre- and post-pandemic. Therein multiple advantages existed among a few manageable disadvantages.

August 30, 2021
By Shaun Waterman
Credit: Shutterstock/vesperstock

It will be a long time, if ever, before it’s possible to securely deploy internet voting systems for most Americans, but even the most skeptical experts are coming around to the idea that online ballots are OK in certain circumstances, attendees of AFCEA’s 2021 Federal Identity Forum and Expo heard Monday.

That was the takeaway from a panel on election identity, featuring technical experts discussing the development and use of identity technologies in voting. Inevitably, the conversation turned to online voting.

August 26, 2021
By George I. Seffers
Vladimir Putin has said that whichever country controls artificial intelligence will rule the world, but experts now question who will be the first to master quantum-enabled artificial intelligence. Credit: By Pavel Chagochkin/Shutterstock

As China, Russia, the United States and others race to gain an advantage with artificial intelligence (AI) technologies, quantum-enabled AI may be the next evolution, according to a panel of experts at the August 16-19 AFCEA TechNet conference in Augusta, Georgia.

The panel of women experts included moderator Carrie McLeish, director of federal capture, SANS Institute; Maj. Gen. Johanna Clyborne, ARNG, deputy commanding general, ARNG U.S. Army Cyber Center of Excellence; Arlene Espinal, vice president, Analytics, Automation, AI and Innovation Capabilities Office, ManTech; and Gokila Dorai, assistant professor, School of Computer and Cyber Sciences.

August 23, 2021
By Shaun Waterman
Two people demonstrate how a device is used to capture imagery of irises for the Next Generation Identification (NGI) Iris Service. Credit: FBI

The FBI has been running a full-scale iris-print ID service as part of its Next Generation Identification, or NGI, system for almost a year now, Douglas Sprouse, a management and program analyst with the bureau’s Biometric Services Section told the 2021 Federal Identity Forum and Expo Monday.

August 19, 2021
By George I. Seffers
A soldier helps set up a tactical command post to test communications in Germany, July 8, 2019.  Photo by Army Sgt. Patrick Jubrey

The U.S. Defense Department has entered the first phase of delivery on a sweeping capability known as Joint All-Domain Command and Control (JADC2), a once-in-a-generation modernization of the military’s approach to commanding forces.

Department officials aim to deliver a minimal viable product that includes an array of capabilities, such as a fundamental platform, identity control access management, zero-trust cybersecurity and data transport capabilities, according to Lt. Gen. Dennis Crall, USMC, director for command, control, communications and computers/cyber and chief information officer, Joint Staff/J-6. Once the minimal viable product, also known as an MVP, is in place, the department can continue to add capabilities.

August 19, 2021
By Robert K. Ackerman
The U.S. Army's DE M-SHORAD air defense system, comprising a laser-equipped Stryker, is slated to be deployed in prototype form in 2022. Credit: U.S. Army photo

Soldiers on the battlefield may be using ray guns to defend against airborne threats sooner rather than later. The U.S. Army Rapid Capabilities and Critical Technologies Office (RCCTO) is fielding four prototype units of Stryker-mounted laser systems in the Directed Energy Maneuver Short-Range Air Defense (DE M-SHORAD) effort.

Each of the four systems employs 50-kilowatt-class lasers powered internally by the Stryker using gasoline-fueled generators. The lasers are designed to protect divisions and brigade combat teams against unmanned aircraft systems, rotary- and fixed-wing threats, rocket artillery and mortar rounds, Army officials say.

August 18, 2021
By George I. Seffers
Panelists at TechNet Augusta 2021 discuss how to achieve a unified network. Photo by Michael Carpenter

In order to make the unified network vision a reality, the Army will need to adopt an array of technical capabilities, including 5G, zero trust cybersecurity, software-defined networks and data fabric.

August 18, 2021
By George I. Seffers
Jennifer Swanson, director, Software Engineering Center, Army Communications-Electronics Command (CECOM) and CW5 Linc McCoy, USA, CECOM’s command chief warrant officer, have a fireside chat during TechNet Augusta 2021.

Just a few years ago, the U.S. Army was sending compact discs with software updates through the mail, a process that could take weeks or even months in some cases, but its software sustainment efforts have improved dramatically and continues to do so, according to Jennifer Swanson, director, Software Engineering Center (SEC), Army Communications-Electronics Command (CECOM).

August 17, 2021
By George I. Seffers
Brig. Gen. Paul Stanton, USA, speaks at TechNet Augusta 2021. Photo by Michael Carpenter

Within this decade, commanders of combat units will have to plan and execute information activity, according to Army officials speaking at the August 17-19 AFCEA TechNet Augusta conference in Augusta, Georgia.

Appearing via video, Lt. Gen. Ted Martin, USA, commander, Combined Arms Center, Fort Leavenworth, said the new doctrine being drafted “as we speak” by Army officials “is forcing us to move into the future, and part of that future is information advantage.”  

August 13, 2021
By George I. Seffers
The DARPA Subterranean Challenge is expected to hold its final event in September. The program already led to advances in underground robotics technology that could be used immediately, the program manager says. DARPA photo.

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency’s Subterranean Challenge, an effort to develop robot technologies capable of performing underground, is expected to host its final contest next month, but the program has advanced robotics technology that already are being used.

The program aims to develop technologies to rapidly map, navigate and search complex underground environments such as human-made tunnel systems, urban undergrounds and natural cave networks. The challenge run by the agency commonly known as DARPA might be described as two challenges in one since it focuses both on physical and virtual robot technologies.

August 5, 2021
 
Connecting data siloes within the Defense Department helps speed operational decision making. Credit: Shutterstock/Gorodenkoff

As technology accelerates all aspects of modern life, from business to warfare, the need for real-time situational awareness has become critical.

But several hurdles must be cleared to achieve this level of awareness, specifically the need to avoid or close any capability gaps and the ability to scale. 

“When you get to the heart of it, when we’re talking about real-time situational awareness, we are talking about mission,” David Erickson, senior director for solutions architecture at Elastic told Robert K. Ackerman, SIGNAL Magazine’s editor in chief during a SIGNAL Media Executive Video interview.

August 4, 2021
By George I. Seffers
The Network Coverage Overlay can be used to maintain a communications link with robotic vehicles. Credit: U.S. Army CCDC C5ISR Center photo/Dan Lafontaine

U.S. Army researchers are developing spectrum visualization technology that offers an array of benefits, including the ability to maintain contact with—and control of—remotely controlled vehicles on the battlefield.

Officials assessed the Network Coverage Overlay (NCO), which has been nicknamed “Nico,” during the recent Network Modernization Experiment at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst in New Jersey.

August 1, 2021
By George I. Seffers
The 173rd Airborne Brigade (Sky Soldiers) is the U.S. Army’s Contingency Response Force in Europe. The unit is next to begin receiving technology designed to simplify tactical network operations. U.S. Army photo

As part of the Army’s efforts to eventually unify its tactical and enterprise networks, the service is developing three pilot technologies designed to simplify the planning and management of its tactical network.

August 1, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
Soldiers observe fired artillery rounds in an M109A6 Paladin howitzer at the Tan Tan Training Area, Morocco in June, during African Lion, U.S. Africa Command’s largest joint, annual exercise. As the Army works to design the portfolio of Next Generation Combat Vehicles (NGCV), scientists at the Army Research Laboratory are examining how to measure communication between soldiers and robotic systems, to improve human-autonomous teams that will fight together in the NGCV. Army Sgt. 1st Class R.J. Lannom

With plans for future U.S. Army soldiers to work with a cadre of autonomous systems, scientists at the Army Research Laboratory are examining the intricacies of communication to support effective operations between groups of soldiers and robotic systems. They are finding ways to measure communication and study conversational processes to understand human-autonomy team performance, trust and cohesion.

July 30, 2021
By Frank Puranik

“No Comms, No Bombs” is the mantra of Military Signals Divisions (Brigades or Corps), and they’re right: Communications is an integral part of any Army, Navy, Air or Space Force.

Luckily the reverse: Comms => Bombs, is not true and comms go far further in the modern military than providing time and location information for bombing. No Comms also means no search and rescue, no logistics support, no tactical awareness, ...

Examples of communications go:

August 1, 2021
By Maj. Brian Kerg, USMC

Satellites are the military communicator’s easy button. As long as the operating environment is permissive, communications planners can easily establish high bandwidth links that satisfy the demands of data-hungry commanders and their staffs. But this go-to solution is a hollow one, as any adversary that can contest the electromagnetic spectrum or the space domain can knock satellite communications out of the fight. Jamming, spoofing and other means of electronic warfare can render satellites ineffective, while missiles and lasers can destroy satellites from the Earth or from space.

August 1, 2021
 

Srini Iyer is the chief technology officer and head of ManTech’s Innovation & Capabilities Office.

Q. How can the military secure data at the edge to ensure reliability?

August 1, 2021
By Jessica Van Horn

Did you know, in 2020, there were a staggering 36 billion records exposed as a result of data breaches, according to a recent report from Risk Based Security? COVID-19 was of course the catalyst for these infringements, as the pandemic gravely impacted industries all over the globe and opened the door for cyber criminals to attack.

August 1, 2021
By Shaun Waterman

To maintain America’s advantage over potential adversaries, the Department of Defense last year outlined a data strategy directing that military leaders must “recognize that data is a strategic asset that must be operationalized in order to provide a lethal and effective Joint Force that, combined with our network of allies and partners, sustains American influence and advances shared security and prosperity.”

July 26, 2021
By George I. Seffers
Program Executive Office for Command, Control, Communications-Tactical and the C5ISR Center integrate Stryker vehicles with the C5ISR/Electronic Warfare Modular Open Suite of Standards (CMOSS) capabilities during the Network Modernization Experiment (NetModX) 2021 from May to July, 2021 at the C5ISR Center’s Ground Activity, Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, New Jersey. Credit: U.S. Army photo by Kathryn Bailey, PEO C3T

The U.S. Army for the first time has demonstrated during its Network Modernization Experiment the integration of three capability cards—one for positioning, navigation and timing, another for mounted mission command, and a third for the TSM tactical communications waveform. The capabilities are associated with the service’s open suite of standards and were integrated onto a Stryker combat vehicle.

July 23, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
High energy lasers will improve battlefield operations through increased intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities, not to mention the counter-unmanned aerial system properties, experts say. Credit: Photo Courtesy of Raytheon

Around for several decades, the technology of combined-fiber, high energy lasers are advancing to the battlefield from laboratory or exercise demonstration. The advent of the production of the technology, advanced battery capabilities and higher laser power—along with a mounting unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) threat—are all combining into more demand and use by the U.S. military. The transition of laser weapon systems to the battlefield brings with it concept of operations and tactics, techniques and procedures that will improve warfighting, said Michael Jirjis, lead, Directed Energy Weapons Experimentation, U.S.

July 20, 2021
By Julianne Simpson

Technology is evolving at an incredibly rapid pace. IT professionals today, whether in government or industry, must stay current with new technology trends and skills to secure the jobs of tomorrow. And given the speed of change and progress, IT professionals must constantly be learning, unlearning and relearning technologies to remain relevant. Having a support system with like-minded technologists and the opportunity to network with a diverse group of government, industry, academic and scientific experts can help immensely. That’s where AFCEA’s Technology Committee comes in.

July 16, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
New York-based Intelligent Artifacts has created groundbreaking artificial intelligence software for mission-critical navigation systems, sensor fusion and machine vision applications for use across the aerospace, defense, automotive and emergency response industries. Credit: Intelligent Artifacts

Entrepreneurs are leading advances in artificial intelligence, chip-level Internet of Things cybersecurity, and satellite capabilities. In 10-minute intervals, representatives from five startup companies pitched these emerging aerospace-related technologies during Starburst Accelerator’s virtual Los Angeles Selection Committee meeting on July 14. The entrepreneurs are vying for partnership agreements, venture capitalist seed funding and a chance to join Starburst's Accelerator program. Headquartered in Paris, with offices in Los Angeles, Singapore, Munich, Tel Aviv, Madrid, Seoul and Mumbai, Starburst has been uniting startups and investors in the aerospace industry for the past eight years.

July 1, 2021
By Robert K. Ackerman
This coronal mass ejection many times the size of Earth erupted from the sun in 2012. Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory are working to prevent events such as this, which missed the Earth by only a few days, from inflicting serious and lasting damage on the power grid.  NASA

The next onslaught on the power grid may come not from a cyber adversary but from our warmest neighbor. Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory are exploring how to protect the grid against a coronal mass ejection from the sun that could physically damage the nation’s electrical infrastructure and knock out power for several weeks with resultant societal chaos and massive economic losses.

July 1, 2021
By George I. Seffers
Digital twin technology aids in the design and maintenance of ships for the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps.Credit: Chesky/Shutterstock

Vice Adm. William Galinis, USN, commander, Naval Sea Systems Command, indicated that digital twins are instrumental in the design of a broad array of ships, including next-generation attack submarines, destroyers and amphibious warships.

July 1, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
Detecting sarcasm in social media is a first step in unlocking how disinformation spreads online, researchers say.  Shutterstock/13_Phunkod

With social media platforms representing one of the main conduits for adversarial propaganda, researchers are examining how information spreads across the digital environment and how it spills into action outside of the online presence. A recent breakthrough in sentiment analysis—with an algorithm that can detect sarcasm—from the University of Central Florida as part of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency’s SocialSim project, aids in this understanding and in defense.

June 10, 2021
By Wolfgang Richter

Across the globe, ministries of defense are continually challenged with meeting the demands of armed forces who need access to the right intelligence products to protect citizens, defend borders and support humanitarian missions.

While the need for rapid decision-making has never been greater, decision makers often lack the timely information required to inform their choices. In dynamic military environments, situations and plans change quickly and intelligence can become outdated. The problem becomes even more complex during joint and multinational operations.

June 21, 2021
 
A U.S. Army soldier provides security during the Advanced Battle Management System (ABMS) exercise at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, Sept. 3, 2020. Staged at multiple military sites, ABMS simulated an attack on the national infrastructure testing the U.S. Department of Defense’s Joint All Domain Command and Control (JADC2) which allowed for a fast-coordinated response.  U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Dwane R. Young

The next-generation battlefield has gone digital. The United States Air Force (USAF) is taking a major defensive leap into that new reality with its Advanced Battle Management System (ABMS) initiative.

July 1, 2021
By George I. Seffers
An Army M1A2 Abrams tank participates in training at Fort Benning, Georgia, in January 2020. Army researchers are integrating the FIRESTORM AI-enabled decision-making aid with the Abrams, as well as a host of other systems.  Army Sgt. Joshua Wooten

With only months remaining before this fall’s Project Convergence 2021, U.S. Army researchers aim to integrate roughly 20 systems with the service’s fledgling artificial intelligence-enabled targeting technology known as FIRES Synchronization to Optimize Responses in Multi-Domain Operations.

July 1, 2021
By Maj. Alison Wallace, USA, and Capt. Chance Foley, USA
Army Staff Sgt. Andrew Kirchoff, left, and Staff Sgt. Roberto Carlos Ramirez operate a satellite communication antenna in Kaedi, Mauritania, February 2020, during Flintlock. The modern warfighter must remain light and agile and enjoy ease of communication, highlighting the necessity for and relevance of devices such as the Global Rapid Response Information Package.  Army Cpl. Kevin Payne

During large-scale combat operations and operations in austere environments, the modern warfighter must remain light and agile and enjoy ease of communication with both higher and lower echelons. These requirements highlight the necessity for and relevance of devices such as the Global Rapid Response Information Package.

July 1, 2021
By Jennifer A. Miller

Have you heard of GAMECHANGER? It is not a game but a tool everyone associated with the U.S. Defense Department will likely find helpful. And the intriguing name matches the tool!

July 1, 2021
By Lt. Gen. Robert M. Shea, USMC (Ret.)

After 15 months of enduring a deadly pandemic, the world is beginning to take stock of the looming unknown future. The shape of things to come remains uncertain, but what is certain is that research and development will lead us into that future.

Two things the pandemic has brought home about research and development: first, the new normal will require changes in technology that will be born of research and development advances; and second, the future economy will be more technology-oriented than today’s, which will require a surge in research to develop new capabilities. These are broad umbrella outlooks, but achieving them will require more specific and nuanced efforts.

June 29, 2021
By George I. Seffers
Navy SEALs conduct train in the Atlantic Ocean, May 29, 2019. Navy Special Warfare Command expects artificial intelligence to augment the human weapon system as well as unmanned systems. Credit: Navy Senior Chief Petty Officer Jayme Pastoric

The U.S. Navy Special Warfare Command seeks to conduct missions no one else can, and officials expect artificial intelligence and machine learning capabilities to assist in that effort, Rear Adm. Hugh Wyman Howard III, USN, the organization’s commander, told the audience today during the 2021 WEST virtual conference.

June 29, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
A Seahawk unmanned surface vessel in the Pacific Ocean and an MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter from the Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 73 participate in U.S. Pacific Fleet’s Unmanned Systems Integrated Battle Problem 21 in April. Naval exercises have been crucial to aiding the integration of unmanned vessels into the fleet and pairing with manned capabilities, experts say. Credit: U.S. Navy/Chief Mass Communication Specialist Shannon Renfroe

The Department of the Navy (DON) has set a course to add a “large number” of air, surface and subsurface unmanned platforms to operate in all domain alongside manned systems. In March, the Navy and the Marine Corps published the Unmanned Campaign Framework to guide their investments in and integration of unmanned platforms. The service should not stray from this effort, despite cultural, operational and funding barriers, said a panel of experts, led by moderator Capt. George Galdorisi, USN (Ret.), director, Strategic Assessments and Technical Futures, Naval Information Warfare Center Pacific, speaking at the virtual West 2021 conference. 

June 24, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
Kurs Orbital is integrating its established rendezvous and docking technology with computer vision, radar capabilities and robotics to create an on-orbit servicing spacecraft fleet for satellites in different orbits. Credit: Kurs Orbital

Entrepreneurs pushing the edge of technological advancement are offering solutions in technical data management software, decentralized identity, aircraft digital parking assistance, spacecraft on-orbit servicing and travel technology. In 10-minute intervals, company representatives pitched their emerging, aerospace-related technologies at Starburst Accelerator’s Paris Selection Committee meeting on June 23, which was held virtually.

June 16, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
A Gulfstream C-37A taxis on the flight line at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, May 3, 2021, carrying Gen. Mark Kelly, USAF, commander of Air Combat Command and his team for a visit about the base’s rebuild. The Air Force’s innovation hub, AFWERX, is conducting a new consecutive three-part challenge to bring in solutions for flightline security, advanced sensors and communication, and aircraft maintenance. Credit: U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Anabel Del Valle

The U.S. Air Force’s innovation arm, AFWERX, is looking for state-of-the-art data, sensor and communication solutions in three concurrent competition areas: the Aircraft Maintenance Operations Challenge; the Flightline Security Challenge; and the Airfield Maintenance and Repair Challenge, which are all part of a greater effort called the Revolutionizing USAF Flightline Operations Challenge.

June 15, 2021
By Julianne Simpson
Credit: Shutterstock/Yurchanka Siarhei

Quantum computing and cryptography are hot topics in the world of emerging technology. But how feasible are they on a large scale?

“Right now those things are energy intensive and expensive and time consuming,” said Bill Halal, founder of TechCast, during the virtual AFCEA/GMU C4I Center Symposium.

June 9, 2021
Posted by Kimberly Underwood
Matt Eichenfield (l) and Lisa Hackett, scientists at Sandia National Labs, recently created a groundbreaking acoustic circulator, a key radio component that separates transmitted and received signals, and is much smaller in size. Credit: Sandia National Labs/Bret Latter

Scientists at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, have constructed a miniaturized acoustic amplifier, which they claim is the world’s smallest. The new acoustic, 276-megahertz amplifier is 0.0008 square inch (0.5 square millimeter). The Sandia researchers made the amplifier with thin-film semiconductor materials that are only 83 layers of atoms thick—1,000 times thinner than a human hair, the laboratory reported. In addition, the researchers were able to successfully harness the use of sound waves for the acousto-electric chip that includes the radio-frequency amplifier, circulator and filter.

June 8, 2021
By George I. Seffers
Soldiers test M1A2 Abrams tanks during a live-fire accuracy screening test at Fort Bliss, Texas, in October. U.S. Army researchers intend to integrate the FIRESTORM artificial intelligence system with the Abrams for Project Convergence 2021 to be held in October and November. Credit: Army Staff Sgt. Kris Bonet

Both soldiers and combat commanders likely will get hands-on experience in the coming months with one of the Army’s hottest new artificial intelligence systems known as FIRESTORM.

The artificial intelligence (AI)-enabled system, formally named FIRES Synchronization to Optimize Responses in Multi-Domain Operations, still is in the science and technology phase and is not yet a formal program of record. It ingests data from sensors and other systems, uses One World Terrain to map the battlefield and recommends the best weapon system to engage specific targets, saving commanders precious time for making decisions. Prior technologies took almost 20 minutes to relay data back to warfighters. FIRESTORM takes 32 seconds.

June 1, 2021
By Robert K. Ackerman
A researcher (inset) uses extended reality (XR) with digital overlays to determine how a fire spreads in a room. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) experiments with XR to evaluate materials for fire-resistant characteristics without putting humans at risk.  NIST

Imagery is yielding to meaning as extended reality heads down a new path of evolution. Where developers traditionally have concentrated on improving graphics to the point of realism, they now are shifting their focus to a different kind of realism that emphasizes meaning over appearance.

This approach is opening new doors for applications of extended reality, also known as XR. Uses such as automated driving, design for manufacturing, augmented reality and firefighting assistance already are growing in popularity and effectiveness, and varieties of those applications are on the horizon. In a few years, XR may be able to aid fighter pilots and the vision impaired.

June 1, 2021
By George I. Seffers
The University of Southern California’s Institute for Creative Technologies has developed a test bed for evaluating a wide array of virtual reality, augmented reality, extended reality and artificial intelligence systems used for military purposes.  Metamorworks/Shutterstock

Researchers at the Institute for Creative Technologies built the Rapid Integration and Development Environment, a test bed for evaluating modeling and simulation technologies for internal use. But the system, which plays a role in creating the Army’s Tactical Computing Environment, is finding users across the Defense Department and in the defense industry.

June 1, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
The ProtoSpace augmented reality system takes collaboration to a higher level, allowing scientists at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory to more easily see and discuss spacecraft design considerations, such as for the Venus Emissivity, Radio Science, InSAR, Topography and Spectroscopy spacecraft.  NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory is using a 3D visualization tool to design innovative space probes, including the Mars 2020 Perseverance Rover and its Ingenuity helicopter. The same tool can help researchers plan work in space’s complex environment.

The mixed reality, computer aided design (CAD) 3D visualization tool is known as ProtoSpace. It has been crucial to the lab’s collaborative development of spacecraft, says the technical lead for ProtoSpace, Benjamin Nuernberger.

June 1, 2021
By Woody Walton

The Defense Department (DoD) is continuing to build out a truly data-centric approach based on the DoD Data Strategy, presenting new opportunities for transforming the way data is collected, analyzed and leveraged.

May 18, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
Marine Corps Chief Warrant Officer 4 Daniel Belew, USMC, academics officer, Marine Corps Communication-Electronics School, speaking at AFCEA’s TechNet Augusta Virtual Series on May 18, reports that the service is working to incorporate an “always-on feedback loop” in which incremental change is incorporated in the academic cycle.

The U.S. Navy and Marines Corps are harnessing virtual platforms and advanced methods to teach cyber and communications skills. In some cases, the services are looking to a “blended model” of instruction from both industry and military cyber experts that produces multitudes of trained personnel for a single investment. Additionally, to create a powerful cyber force, technical training needs to be as realistic as possible, with high-fidelity cyber training ranges that can meet high standards for mission rehearsals and training on a daily basis and can be accessed anywhere in the world. 

May 18, 2021
 
The DoD is investing heavily in the promise of high-speed edge computing with 5G technologies. Credit: Shutterstock

As the Department of Defense (DoD) transitions to 5G mobile technology for its warfighter and facility-based communications, the agency must take several considerations into account such as security and the ability to interoperate with other systems.

One of the biggest attractions of 5G is the promise of high-speed wireless data rates, but that’s just part of the picture, Chris Thomas, an information technology (IT) communications strategist and systems architect at Dell Technologies, told SIGNAL Magazine Editor in Chief Robert K. Ackerman during a SIGNAL Executive Video interview.

May 14, 2021
By George I. Seffers
The CIRCM system provides U.S. Army aircraft unprecedented protection from current and emerging missile threats. Credit: Northrop Grumman photo

The U.S. Army already is fielding its Common Infrared Countermeasures system to some units and will deliver the system simultaneously to all types of aircraft, Army officials told reporters during a recent telephonic roundtable.

May 6, 2021
Posted by George I. Seffers
NIST researchers entangled the beats of two mechanical drums—tiny aluminum membranes each made of about 1 trillion atoms—and precisely measured their linked quantum properties. Entangled pairs massive by quantum pairs might someday perform computations and transmit data in large-scale quantum networks. Credit: John Teufel/NIST

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have “entangled” two small mechanical drums and precisely measured their linked quantum properties. Similar entangled pairs may someday perform computations and transmit data in large-scale quantum networks.

The NIST team, which was led by physicist John Teufel, used microwave pulses to entice the two tiny aluminum drums into a quantum version of the Lindy Hop, with one partner bopping in a cool and calm pattern while the other was jiggling a bit more. Researchers analyzed radar-like signals to verify that the two drums’ steps formed an entangled pattern—a duet that would be impossible in the everyday classical world, according to a NIST press release.

May 3, 2021
By Beverly Cooper
Unified communications is more than voice and conferencing access. It can enable agencies to embrace automation, enhance situational awareness, improve operations and business continuity, and support digital transformation and multivendor relationships as it helps ensure public safety, cybersecurity, and speed, scalability and capacity. Credit: ESB Professional/Shutterstock

The unexpected pivot to a largely remote workforce has put unprecedented pressure on communications capabilities and systems, and this pressure extends beyond voice and conference access. Government and military agencies are increasingly working to interconnect information, people and resources, but to do so efficiently, they must leverage existing unified communication solutions, platforms and processes. As agencies adapt, the goal is to ensure continued access to data through secure and reliable methods.