• The plenary panel discussion on defense intelligence at the AFCEA/INSA Intelligence & National Security Summit  features (l-r) moderator Lt. Gen. Vincent R. Stewart, USMC (Ret.); Kari Bingen, undersecretary of defense for intelligence, U.S. Defense Department; Suzanne White, deputy director, DIA; Maj. Gen. Jeffrey Kruse, USAF, director of defense intelligence (warfighter support); and Rear Adm. Frank “Trey” Whitworth, USN, J-2, The Joint Staff. Credit: Herman Farrer Photography
     The plenary panel discussion on defense intelligence at the AFCEA/INSA Intelligence & National Security Summit features (l-r) moderator Lt. Gen. Vincent R. Stewart, USMC (Ret.); Kari Bingen, undersecretary of defense for intelligence, U.S. Defense Department; Suzanne White, deputy director, DIA; Maj. Gen. Jeffrey Kruse, USAF, director of defense intelligence (warfighter support); and Rear Adm. Frank “Trey” Whitworth, USN, J-2, The Joint Staff. Credit: Herman Farrer Photography

Intelligence Has an Extensive Industry Wish List

September 4, 2019
By Robert K. Ackerman
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Partnership is the key for government and the private sector to serve the community.


A panel of military intelligence chiefs was not shy about telling industry what they need from it. Speaking at the AFCEA/INSA Intelligence & National Security Summit on Wednesday, September 4, these flag officers listed their technology and capability wish list for many attendees from the commercial sector.

“Industry needs to help us modernize our manpower-intensive linear labor processes,” said Kari Bingen, undersecretary of defense for intelligence, U.S. Defense Department.

“Industry needs to help us to challenge our assumptions on what we need,” offered Suzanne White, deputy director, Defense Intelligence Agency.

Rear Adm. Frank “Trey” Whitworth, USN, J-2, The Joint Staff, asked for two capabilities: one is to automate the process of collection management; while the other is to help friendly forces distinguish enemies from non-enemies in targeting.

Maj. Gen. Jeffrey Kruse, USAF, director for defense intelligence (warfighter support), asked for data interoperability and data standards to help enable interoperability. He also cited the need for collaborative development—"partnering with industry from the very beginning.”

Many of these capabilities will be needed to counter the Chinese challenge that continues to grow, the panelists said. “At the macro level, I consider China an open book,” Gen. Kruse stated. “We know what their aspirations are … to displace the U.S. as the global power.

“China would like us to take little to no action; to focus on the urgent instead of the long term,” he added.

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