DCOS Coverage 2018

May 17, 2018
Kimberly Underwood
Panelists discuss partnerships in cyber warfare at the AFCEA Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium.

Thoughts by experts about the ability of the military to defend cyberspace are centering around the concept of improved partnerships, which may be outside of the Defense Department’s usual practices. A lot can be gained from the insight of coalition partners and think tanks—wisdom and information that the DOD may not have tapped into, experts said.

May 17, 2018
By Kimberly Underwood
Panelists at the Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium discuss directing change to organize the cyberspace warfighting domain.

Providing an information network that enables warfighters to perform global missions is not easy given the network itself is besieged constantly by cyber attacks. All U.S. Defense Department organizations use the complex technical infrastructure known as the Department of Defense Information Network (DODIN), and the responsibility to protect it 24/7 falls squarely on the shoulders of Joint Force Headquarters–Department of Defense Information Network (JFHQ-DODIN).

May 17, 2018
by Kimberly Underwood
Mark Russinovich, chief technology officer, Microsoft Azure, discusses machine learning at the AFCEA Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium.

Machine learning has advanced to the point where more sophisticated methods can be more effective at cyber event detection than traditional methods, an expert says. Along with emerging methods, access to large amounts of “fresh” data is important for processing, determining trends and identifying malicious activity.

Teams looking at how to use machine learning need to consider different methods, suggested Mark Russinovich, chief technology officer, Microsoft Azure, at the AFCEA Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium (DCOS) in Baltimore on May 17.

May 17, 2018
By Kimberly Underwood
Dana Deasy, the new DOD CIO (r), chats with Brig. Gen. Kevin B. Kennedy, USA, during the Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium.

A technologist who has never served in the military and has never worked in government has taken the reigns as chief information officer (CIO) of the Department of Defense. But Dana Deasy has plenty of experience in almost 37 years as a private industry information technology executive, leading the IT needs of such venerable corporations as JP Morgan Chase & Co., BP Group, General Motors North America, Siemens Corp. Americas, and Tyco International.

May 17, 2018
Kimberly Underwood
Panelists at the Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium discuss AI in the C2 domain.

Experts speaking at the AFCEA Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium in Baltimore agree that the use of artificial intelligence (AI) in warfighting, and in command and control (C2) applications in particular, could provide advantages to the warfighter in terms of faster information processing and improved decision making and cyber defense. The hitch, though, is that the quality of data used to build algorithms and add to machine learning can vary. This impacts the quality of AI-related conclusions, which could put warfighters at great risk.

May 16, 2018
By Kaitlyn Cotter
Panelists discuss STEM education and training cyber warfighters during a panel at the Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium.

Raising the bar for STEM education comes through practice, competition and a culture shift to help prepare the next generation of defense leaders. It’s less about how many hours of STEM courses or what is the right age to engage kids in STEM and more of a focus on how to create access to opportunities in a way that they can connect with for the long term.

May 16, 2018
By Beverly Cooper
Panelists discuss women in the cyber workforce during a session at the Defensive Cyber Security Symposium.

Between 1.5 and 3 million cyber professionals will be needed worldwide by the year 2020 according to various studies. However, the majority of individuals currently entering the field are male; estimates are only 5 percent to 11 percent of professionals entering technical fields are women on a global basis. It is critical to bring more women into cyber fields not only to fortify the cyber workforce with more talent but also to apply the power of diversity that leads to better solutions.

May 16, 2018
by Kimberly Underwood

Faced with unending cyber attacks that are increasing in sophistication and coming from all types of adversaries, the U.S. Army Cyber Center of Excellence is preparing its best defense: cyber operators. With a dedicated section of the Army’s force that focuses only on cyberspace operations, the service must continue to fill the ranks and train cyber operators, said Maj. Gen. John Morrison Jr., USA, commanding general, U.S. Army Cyber Center of Excellence (CoE) and Fort Gordon.

May 16, 2018
By Beverly Cooper
Credit: Shutterstock

If you think of the cyber threat as Godzilla, you can see the need for a framework that optimizes limited resources. As the beast attacks the building, those individuals located on the ground floor—for example the architects and engineers—worry about being stepped on by its feet. Those on the next floor up, the systems engineers, see the knees and want protection from being kicked. The next level, the incident responders, see the claws and worry about what those claws can do. Higher in the building, the operators see the shoulders and are focused on how big the threat might be based on the shoulder size. The customers at the top only see teeth and flames.

May 15, 2018
Kimberly Underwood
Panelists, moderated by Stephen Wallace, chief technology director, Development and Business Center, DISA (far r), discuss innovation at the AFCEA Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium.

Companies or government agencies that strive for innovation have to keep development at the forefront, experts say. And the action of providing impactful ideas that turn into effective products is always “far more complicated in reality,” according to Jennifer Yates, assistant vice president, AT&T Labs.

May 15, 2018
By Kimberly Underwood
Anthony Montemarano, executive deputy director, DISA, speaks at the Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium.

As the Department of Defense is working to improve lethality, it is making the transition to fight in the new domain of cyber, according to Anthony Montemarano, executive deputy director, Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA). The key to this evolution is innovation and harnessing emerging technologies to protect and defend the homeland. “We’ve got to get ahead of the adversaries,” he said.

Speaking to a room packed full of industry and government officials on Tuesday at the AFCEA Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium (DCOS) in Baltimore, and in an interview with SIGNAL Magazine, Montemarano called on industry to provide innovation.

May 15, 2018
By Kimberly Underwood
Vice Adm. Nancy Norton, USN, DISA director and commander of JFHQ-DODIN, speaks at the AFCEA Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium.

In her unique, dual-hatted role as director of the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) and commander of the Joint Force Headquarters–Department of Defense Information Network (JFHQ-DODIN), Vice Adm. Nancy Norton, USN, is pushing to provide the best communication and information technology capabilities to the Defense Department (DOD).

“Everything we do is to support the warfighter and increase their ability to accomplish their mission,” she said. The admiral was the keynote speaker opening the AFCEA Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium (DCOS) in Baltimore on May 15.