Fed ID 2018 Coverage

September 27, 2018
By Shaun Waterman
Credit: Shutterstock/Blazej Lyjak

The growth in a new kind of identity theft highlights the need for the federal government to step up and help the private sector verify citizens’ identity, experts and officials said at the AFCEA Federal ID Summit Thursday.

Synthetic identity fraud happens when a genuine social security number is used alongside a false name and date of birth to get credit or some other monetary benefit, Allison Lefrak, an attorney with the Federal Trade Commission's’ Division of Privacy and Identity Protection, told a session on identity theft.

“It’s on the rise,” she said.

September 27, 2018
By Shaun Waterman
Credit: Shuterstock/jannoon028

Artificial intelligence and machine learning are powering a new generation of technology that can identify computer users by the way they handle their keyboard and mouse.

Known as behavioral biometrics, the technology provides a way to continuously authenticate users—guarding against credential theft and account takeover, two of the most common forms of online attacks.

September 26, 2018
By Shaun Waterman
Federal CIO Suzette Kent discusses the role of identity mangement in federal IT modernization during AFCEA’s Federal Identity Summit.

Identity isn’t mentioned in the President’s Management Agenda — the Trump administration’s blueprint for modernizing the federal government. But it is central to almost everything the federal government wants to accomplish in IT transformation and digitizing citizen services, Federal Chief Information Officer Suzette Kent told AFCEA’s Federal Identity Summit Wednesday.

“Identity and how we control access to information in the federal government ... is central to all the strategies that we’re talking about and the things that we’re doing” with regard to IT modernization, she said in a keynote address.

September 26, 2018
By Shaun Waterman
Credit: Shutterstock/jijomathaidesigners

The Trump administration is moving to expand the information-sharing apparatus built to stop terrorists entering the U.S. to cover foreign hackers, weapons proliferators, international organized criminals and other kinds of threat actors — and extending it to aliens already in the country who apply for citizenship or other immigration benefits.

The move, in a pair of presidential memoranda signed over the past year, has created a host of policy and technical challenges for the agencies involved, officials told AFCEA’s Federal ID Summit in Tampa on Tuesday.

September 25, 2018
By Shaun Waterman

Biometric databases held by the Defense Department, the FBI and the Department of Homeland Security will be able to communicate with each other seamlessly for the first time ever once a new standard for encoding biometric information is approved next year, DOD officials told the audience at the AFCEA Federal Identity Forum in Tampa, Florida, on Tuesday.