INDO-PACOM

November 1, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
Galt speaks in 2017 to U.S. Armed Forces service members in Mongolia during the annual Khaan Quest, the Mongolian-hosted exercise designed to strengthen the capabilities of the U.S., Mongolia and other partner nations in international peacekeeping operations. Galt emphasizes the need for strengthening U.S. partnerships, given the threat that China presents in the Indo-Pacific region. U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Pacific photo by Lance Cpl. Maximiliano Rosas

The People’s Republic of China is engaging in coercion, lawfare, militarization, human rights violations, imperialism and cyber espionage, say experts. These actions are part of a well-funded and well-organized whole-of-government thrust to be the dominant power in the world, and how the United States addresses these efforts may well determine the status of the world in the 21st century.The threat to the Indo-Pacific region, to the U.S.

November 1, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
Working with members of the Air Force’s logistics innovation center, Tesseract, helped the researchers gain insight into possible logistical problems and how to solve them at scale, says Capt. Molly Locke, USAF. “They had the data and the lessons learned available to help us understand the current ecosystem’s limitations and where repurposing this new drone technology could help alleviate the pain points they had previously found.”  USAF Technical Sergeant Michael Battles

A stealth unmanned aircraft under development as an inexpensive expendable tactical vehicle may find a use as a supply drone serving the vast Indo-Pacific region. Researchers at the U.S. Air Force’s Air University are exploring this alternative use for the XQ-58A Valkyrie, which is part of the service’s Low-Cost Attritable Aircraft Technology program to develop expendable vehicles that can be deployed in high-risk environments.

September 29, 2021
 

Maj. Gen. Stephen D. Sklenka, USMC, has been nominated for appointment to the rank of lieutenant general and assignment as deputy commander, U.S. Indo-Pacific Command

July 13, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
A view of Taipei, Taiwan’s capital city, extends over the horizon. Military action by China against Taiwan may “only be a matter of time, and not a matter of ‘if,’” warns Rear Adm. Michael Studeman, USN, the intelligence leader, or J-2, of the U.S. Indo-Pacific Command. Credit: Shutterstock/SkyImages

For 25 years, Rear Adm. Michael Studeman, USN, director, J-2, U.S. Indo-Pacific Command, has been sounding the warning bell about the government of China and the threat it brings to the world and the United States. The threat is real, and China’s intent is clear, the leader has warned. The United States must now examine the time elements associated with China’s dangerous moves, the intelligence leader says. 

March 4, 2021
By George I. Seffers
China is often first in the information operations competition, keeping the United States and its allies and partners in the Asia Pacific on defense. Credit: andriano.cz/Shutterstock

With its rapid-fire information operations campaign, China effectively outguns the United States and its partners and allies in the Indo-Pacific region, according to three military officers from the United States and Australia.

November 6, 2020
 

Raytheon Co., Dulles, Virginia, has been awarded a $20,887,884 firm-fixed-price modification (P00007) to contract FA7022-17-D-0001 for mobile sensors operations and maintenance. This contract modification is for continued non‐personal services for operations and maintenance for mobile sensors.  Work will be performed at Patrick Air Force Base, Florida, and on board two vessels operating in Indo-Pacific Command and Central Command area of responsibility and is expected to be completed October 31, 2021. Fiscal 2021 operation and maintenance funds will be obligated on individual task orders.  This modification brings the total cumulative face value of the contract to $165,000,000.

September 22, 2020
By Robert K. Ackerman
Ships of the U.S. Navy, the Indian Navy, the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force and the Republic of Philippine Navy transit through international waters in the South China Sea. Nations increasingly are working together in the face of Chinese aggression in the region. Credit: Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force

In its quest for global supremacy, China has overtaken the United States in some areas but remains uncertain of its own position in head-to-head competition. The United States can take advantage of this status, but must be careful of overconfidence.

These were two key points expressed by Rear Adm. Michael Studeman, USN, director of intelligence/J-2, U.S. Indo-Pacific Command (INDO-PACOM). Speaking at a virtual AFCEA Hawaii Chapter luncheon, Adm. Studeman cited these elements as he focused on seven myths about China.

August 24, 2020
By George I. Seffers
In recent years, the Army's Cyber Blitz experiment evolved well beyond just cyber, allowing the service to define the integration of cyberspace, electronic warfare, intelligence, space and information operations. Beginning next year, the experiment will be known as Multi-Domain Operations Live. Photo by Spc. Marcus Gresham, USA

The U.S. Army’s technology assessment experiment known as Cyber Blitz has grown beyond its cyber roots. Beginning next year, when it will be held in the Indo-Pacific region, the exercise will be known as Multi-Domain Operations (MDO) Live.

June 25, 2020
By Robert K. Ackerman
A Terminal High-Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) interceptor is launched from the Reagan Test Site in Kwajalein Atoll. THAAD is one component of a layered missile defense system being configured to stop incoming missile attacks. (Credit: Missile Defense Agency)

Cruise missiles are a serious threat challenging defensive systems, and advances in hypersonic design and performance promise to make them even more deadly, say U.S. missile defense flag officers. Peer adversaries are testing systems that would threaten U.S. assets both tactically and strategically, and the military services are working with the Missile Defense Agency on layered defenses that would serve both purposes.

March 3, 2020
By Robert K. Ackerman
Adm. Philip S. Davidson, USN, commander, U.S. Indo-Pacific Command, warns of Chinese aggression in his Tuesday keynote luncheon address at WEST 2020. Photo by Michael Carpenter

A broadly expanded and multifaceted training effort entailing multiple friends and allies will be necessary to forestall Chinese adventurism in the Indo-Pacific region, said the commander of U.S. forces there. Adm. Philip S. Davidson, USN, commander, U.S. Indo-Pacific Command, laid out an extensive description of the threat China poses to the global community on the final day of WEST 2020, the conference and exposition in San Diego March 2-3 co-sponsored by AFCEA International and USNI.

October 15, 2019
By Robert K. Ackerman
A Philippine airman acts as a gunner for a U.S. Marine during a surface-to-air missile simulation in a joint exercise. The U.S. Into-Pacific Command is seeking new technologies that will enable U.S. and partner forces to interoperate advanced capabilities in the battlespace. Credit: Lance Cpl. Brianna Tuck, USMC

The U.S. Indo-Pacific Command (INDOPACOM) is confronting technologically proficient adversaries with a combination of innovation and cooperation as it prepares for operations ranging from disaster relief to military force countermeasures. The command has a technology wish list that encompasses virtually all of its missions and is heavy on building cooperation among current and new allies and partners.

Deterrence is the name of the game for INDOPACOM, says its commander, Adm. Phil Davidson, USN. He describes the strategy’s goal as knitting together allies and partners to assure them of the way ahead, thereby deterring adversaries in the region.

August 1, 2019
By Robert K. Ackerman
The amphibious assault ship USS Boxer anchors off the coast of Phuket, Thailand. The U.S. Indo-Pacific Command is advancing the quality of technology in multinational training exercises, so allies and partners can interoperate in cyber the way they might have to in regional operations. U.S. Navy photo

The U.S. Indo-Pacific Command is incorporating new cyber technologies and standards as it strives for greater interoperability among a growing number of allies and potential partners. This increased reliance on cyber is viewed by command leadership as essential for maintaining effective military capabilities in the face of a growing kinetic and cyber presence by diverse adversaries.

July 31, 2019
By Kimberly Underwood
The United States is keeping a close eye on adversaries in the Indo-Pacific Region, says Gen. Charles Brown, USAF, commander, Pacific Air Forces, speaking at yesterday’s Mitchell Institute event in Arlington, Virginia.

The U.S. Air Force’s role in the Indo-Pacific region of the world is complex given the current atmosphere and threat environment. The region is host to 44 percent of the world’s trade and 60 percent of the world’s population. And for the United States, four of the five major challenges and threats identified by the National Defense Strategy and the National Security Strategy are in the Indo-Pacific region, including revisionist powers China and Russia, said the commander of the U.S. Pacific Air Forces, Gen. Charles Brown. The four-star general, whose area of responsibility is the Indo-Pacific, is also air component commander for the U.S.