Intel Summit 2019 Coverage

September 5, 2019
By Robert K. Ackerman
A phalanx of U.S. intelligence chiefs review the community's progress to close out the Intelligence & National Security Summit. Pictured are (l-r) panel moderator David Ignatius, associate editor and columnist, The Washington Post; Lt. Gen. Paul M. Nakasone, USA, commander, CYBERCOM and NSA; Christopher Scolese, director, NRO; Lt. Gen. Robert P. Ashley, USA, director, DIA; Vice Adm. Robert Sharp, USN, director, NGA; and Paul Abbate, associate deputy director, FBI. Credit: Herman Farrer Photography

Government agencies are working together much more effectively as they counter terrorism and state-sponsored attacks in cyberspace. But more remains to be done as adversaries introduce new tactics and capabilities.

A panel comprising the top U.S. intelligence officials reviewed these issues as they closed out the AFCEA/INSA Intelligence & National Security Summit on September 5. Their points ranged from foreign interference in U.S. elections to cooperation—or the lack thereof—from industry with the U.S. government.

September 5, 2019
By Robert K. Ackerman
 Panelists at the AFCEA/INSA Intelligence & National Security Summit discussing the hard truth about disinformation are (l-r) Sujit Raman, associate deputy attorney general, U.S. Department of Justice; Daniel Kimmage, principal deputy coordinator, Global Engagement Center, State Department; Suzanne Kelly, CEO, The Cipher Brief; and Brett Horvath, president, Guardians.ai. Credit: Herman Farrer Photography

Foreign countries are likely to continue their cyber-based disinformation campaigns as an inexpensive way of shaping thinking in democracies, according to a panel of experts at the AFCEA/INSA Intelligence & National Security Summit on September 5. Only a concerted effort by government, the commercial sector and the public can blunt its effects, especially as the 2020 elections loom.

“Disinformation is not the weaponization of knowledge, it’s the weaponization of cognition,” declared Brett Horvath, president, Guardians.ai. “To have a coherent strategy, it has to be built on principles: What are you defending, and what are you attacking?”

September 5, 2019
By Robert K. Ackerman
Describing U.S. actions against cyber attacks at the AFCEA/INSA Intelligence and National Security Summit are (l-r) panel moderator David Sanger, The New York Times; Lt. Gen. Stephen G. Fogarty, USA, commander, U.S. Army Cyber Command; Rick Howard, chief security officer, Palo Alto Networks; Jeanette Manfra, assistant director for cybersecurity, DHS; and Tonya Ugoretz, deputy assistant director for cyber, FBI. Credit: Herman Farrer Photography

The United States is now presenting cyber adversaries with a bill for their malevolent activities. Counter-cyber efforts have joined traditional defensive measures as the intelligence community confronts cybermarauders with greater detection, discovery and prevention.

Several high-ranking intelligence officials described this new tack in combating cyber threats during a panel discussion at the AFCEA/INSA Intelligence & National Security Summit on September 5. Their observations ranged from election meddling to a potential all-out cyber war.

September 5, 2019
By Robert K. Ackerman
Exploring the need for intelligence in the newly emphasized space domain at the AFCEA/INSA Intelligence & National Security Summit on September 5 are (l-r) Chris DeMay, founder and CTO, Hawkeye 360; Stacey Dixon, deputy director, NGA; Tina Harrington, director, SIGINT, NRO; and Maj. Gen. John E. Shaw, USAF, deputy commander, Air Force Space Command.

With space assuming greater importance as a military domain with its own designated command, the U.S. intelligence community must dedicate assets and procedures to providing vital information about space-based operations. For decades, the ultimate high ground was a valuable source of intelligence across the spectrum of national security. Now, its value as an intelligence target is growing as much as its importance as an operational domain.

September 4, 2019
By Robert K. Ackerman
The plenary panel discussion on defense intelligence at the AFCEA/INSA Intelligence & National Security Summit  features (l-r) moderator Lt. Gen. Vincent R. Stewart, USMC (Ret.); Kari Bingen, undersecretary of defense for intelligence, U.S. Defense Department; Suzanne White, deputy director, DIA; Maj. Gen. Jeffrey Kruse, USAF, director of defense intelligence (warfighter support); and Rear Adm. Frank “Trey” Whitworth, USN, J-2, The Joint Staff. Credit: Herman Farrer Photography

A panel of military intelligence chiefs was not shy about telling industry what they need from it. Speaking at the AFCEA/INSA Intelligence & National Security Summit on Wednesday, September 4, these flag officers listed their technology and capability wish list for many attendees from the commercial sector.

“Industry needs to help us modernize our manpower-intensive linear labor processes,” said Kari Bingen, undersecretary of defense for intelligence, U.S. Defense Department.

September 4, 2019
By Robert K. Ackerman
Panelists discussing military service intelligence priorities at the AFCEA/INSA Intelligence & National Security Summit are (l-r) panel moderator Lt. Gen. Robert Noonan, USA (Ret.); Lt. Gen. Scott Berrier, USA;  Lt. Gen. Veralinn “Dash” Jamieson, USAF; and Rear Adm. Steve Parode, USN. Credit: Herman Farrer Photography

Intelligence experts at the AFCEA/INSA Intelligence & National Security Summit on Wednesday, September 4, offered that the hybrid cloud may be the digital holy grail for future intelligence operations. Disciplines ranging from international intelligence sharing to artificial intelligence, which are being counted on for effective operations, might not attain their true potential without it.

September 4, 2019
By Robert K. Ackerman
Gen. Joseph Votel, USA (Ret.), former SOCOM and CENTCOM commander, discusses the challenges facing the intelligence community with Michele Flournoy, co-founder of WestExec Advisors, at the Intelligence & National Security Summitt 2019. Credit: Herman Farrer Photography

Better information exchange, improved analysis and innovative technologies to keep up with adversaries will be essential if the intelligence community is to serve U.S. national security interests effectively in the coming years, stated experts at the opening session of the AFCEA/INSA Intelligence & National Security Summit on Wednesday, September 4.