JADC2

November 10, 2020
By Kimberly Underwood
Two scores of airmen and four B-1B Lancers from Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, arrive at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam in May to conduct missions in the Indo-Pacific theater, supporting the Pacific Air Forces’ training with allies and partners and performing strategic deterrence missions to reinforce the rules-based international order in the region. Credit: PACAF Public Affairs/Tech. Sgt. David Scott-Gaughan

The new concept of employing computerized modeling and virtualization to the acquisition cycle may provide advanced aircraft more quickly to the U.S. Air Force, said Gen. Kenneth Wilsbach, USAF, commander, Pacific Air Forces (PACAF); Air Component commander, U.S. Indo-Pacific Command; and executive director, Pacific Air Combat Operations Staff, Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii. The concept can also be applied to communications, sensors and network systems.

The new PACAF commander spoke at a recent Mitchell Institute for Aerospace Studies virtual event.

November 5, 2020
 

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November 1, 2020
By Kimberly Underwood
U.S. Air Force airmen monitor computers in support of the Advanced Battle Management System Onramp 2 exercise in September at Joint Base Andrews, Maryland. The military held multiple exercises this fall that proved some of the initial concepts of joint warfighting across all domains. Credit: Air Force photo by Senior Airman Daniel Hernandez

The U.S. military is rapidly pursuing Joint All-Domain Command and Control, known as JADC2, as a way to confront near-peer adversaries China, Russia and other nations. The effort requires innovative computing, software and advanced data processing; emerging technologies such as artificial intelligence, cloud and 5G communications; along with integration of the military’s existing legacy systems. Leaders have learned that to fully implement JADC2, they have to shed some of the military’s old practices.

October 8, 2020
By Kimberly Underwood
U.S. Air Force Airmen monitor computers in support of the Advanced Battle Management System Onramp 2 exercise. Multiple exercises took place this fall to prove some of the initial concepts of joint warfighting across all domains. Credit: Air Force photo by Senior Airman Daniel Hernandez

The U.S. military is rapidly pursuing Joint All-Domain Command and Control to confront near-peer adversaries, including China and Russia. Innovative computing, software and advanced data processing, as well as emerging technologies such as artificial intelligence, cloud and 5G communications, will be needed. Leaders also understand they must shed some of the military’s old practices to succeed.

October 1, 2020
By Kimberly Underwood
Department of Defense Chief Information Officer Dana Deasy, pictured speaking at the Pentagon in April, explained to reporters yesterday that the department has not heard anything back from the Federal Communications Commission about the disputed Ligado ruling. Credit: DOD photo by Marvin Lynchard

The Defense Department’s Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure, or JEDI, cloud effort has been tied up in the Court of Federal Claims since a preliminary injunction was issued in February. And although that has prevented the DOD from implementing Microsoft Azure cloud computing solutions, the department is not sitting idle, according to Chief Information Officer Dana Deasy.

“Cloud for me has always been first and foremost about supporting the warfighter,” Deasy told a group of reporters yesterday during a virtual Defense Writers Group meeting. “And when we got put on hold with JEDI, that didn't mean we were going to stop working on figuring out ways to support the warfighter.”

September 15, 2020
By Kimberly Underwood
Gen. John "Jay" Raymond, USSF, the chief of Space Operations, is emphasizing the digital nature of the new Space Force.

With space a contested domain, the U.S. military’s newest service, the Space Force, must be bold and faster in its operations, reports Gen. John “Jay” Raymond, USSF, chief of Space of Operations, U.S. Space Force.

The leader, who is responsible for organizing, training and equipping the service’s space force as well as providing space-based capabilities, is spearheading a digital-based vision for the service. Part of this new force design is making sure that electronic- and computing-based capabilities underpin its structure.

August 1, 2020
By Kimberly Underwood
The Army is integrating Joint All Domain Command and Control capability as part of its tactical network modernization efforts. Credit: U.S. Army

The U.S. Army has spent the last two years pursuing a modernized integrated tactical network, or ITN, that supports increased mobility, resiliency and capabilities. Now, the service has a focus toward making sure that the modernization of that network can enable joint all-domain command and control, or the concept of JADC2. The service is preparing to fight seamlessly across the sea, land, air, space and cyberspace, or multidomain operations, by 2028.

August 1, 2020
By Kimberly Underwood
A U.S. Army soldier stands outside a Humvee before the start of the Dasman Shield live fire exercise in Kuwait in February. During the exercise, the military looked at the beginnings of all domain operations, including air-to-ground command control, as well as partner interoperability with Kuwaiti forces.  U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kevin Tanenbaum

The message from the intelligence community and top leaders of the U.S. military is clear. The nation is in near-peer competition, just underneath the level of outright war. As such, the U.S. military is investing in aligning its capabilities and functionality to fight as a Joint force seamlessly across the sea, air, land, space and cyberspace. Along with the other services, the U.S. Army is working to shape the approach of how the military will fight in the future under Joint all-domain operations.

July 14, 2020
By George I. Seffers
A Polish army officer talks with village elders in the Ghazni province of Afghanistan. U.S. Army officials are discussing the need to include international partners and allies in the Joint All-Domain Command and Control concept, which is expected to dramatically improve interoperability. U.S. Army photo by Spc. Micah E. Clare

U.S. Army leaders are considering adding “combined” to the Joint All-Domain Operations Command and Control (JADC2) concept to include international partners and allies, such as the so-called Five Eyes nations, says Army Undersecretary James McPherson.

McPherson made the comments July 14 during the virtual Army Signal Conference 2020, which is sponsored by AFCEA.

July 1, 2020
 

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June 18, 2020
By Kimberly Underwood
U.S. Air Force Airmen from the 31st Fighter Wing perform a preflight inspection of an F-16 Fighting Falcon before takeoff during exercise Agile Buzzard at Decimomannu Air Base, Italy, in January. The Air Force is expanding its concept of Agile Combat Employment to apply to Europe. Credit: U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Heidi Goodsell

The U.S. Air Force is moving forward with its concept of Agile Combat Employment as a way to increase its force generation capabilities in a contested environment. The Pacific Air Forces, or PACAF, under Gen. Charles Q. Brown, USAF, who is moving into his role as the chief of the Air Force on August 6, replacing a retiring Gen. David Goldfein, USAF, began looking at how to engage small groups of multifunctional airmen to increase capabilities in the Indo-Pacific region last year. In February, PACAF conducted training of airmen in this so-called Agile Combat Employment concept, which is designed to shift operational-level forces into smaller, tactical-level forces.

June 16, 2020
 

The U.S. Air Force awarded a $950 Million indefinite quantity indefinite delivery contract to Los Angeles-based Silvus Technologies. Under the contract, Silvus will supply its so-called StreamCaster Mobile Ad Hoc Network (MANET) radio systems to support the Advanced Battle Management System (ABMS) program. The company initally provided the MANET-based network during the military's Joint all domain command and control (JADC2) testing at a December 2019 exercise at Eglin Air Force base. Under the new contract, Silvus will provide additional StreamCaster MANET equipment to support future events. 

May 20, 2020
By Kimberly Underwood
The Army tests an integrated mounted reconnaissance capability on a manned Stryker and an unmanned ground system called the Squad Maneuver Equipment Transport during the Joint Warfighter Assessment (JWA) 2019 in December. The Army is preparing Joint All-Domain Command and Control, or JADC2, capabilities to test at the next JWA in 2021. Credit: U.S. Army photo by Jack Bunja.

With the U.S. Defense Department’s pursuit of Joint all-domain operations and the integrated command and control technologies needed to support activities across sea, land, air, space and cyberspace, the Army is looking at how to move beyond its first year of experimentation. The service is working to put in place a more sustainable approach to assessing and experimenting with Joint All-Domain Command and Control, or JADC2, capabilities, to support large-scale combat operations through each warfighting domain.

April 23, 2020
By Kimberly Underwood
Chief of Staff of the Air Force Gen. David Goldfein, USAF, speaks to airmen at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington, in June 2018. With the advent of the COVID-19 pandemic, Gen. Goldfein is taking steps as part of a second retooling effort for the service to operate over the next year under the "new abnormal" environment. Credit: U.S. Air Force photo by A1C Sara Hoerichs

The U.S. Air Force has initially adjusted to the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic and is now shifting to operate under a new paradigm for the foreseeable future, Chief of Staff of the U.S. Air Force Gen. David Goldfein, USAF, stated. The service has examined how to sustain its critical Defense Department mission areas despite the prominence of the virus. The Air Force has adjusted its methods to ensure operation of its nuclear defense; space; intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance; air mobility and cyber missions, the core functions needed to defend the nation. “We still have a hot fight going on,” Gen. Goldfein stated. “So, intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance and air mobility are critical.”

February 4, 2019
By Kimberly Underwood
Lt. Gen. Christopher "Wedge" Weggeman, USAF, deputy commander, Air Combat Command (ACC), speaks at the AFCEA Rocky Mountain Chapter’s Cyberspace Symposium 2020.

For the last year, the U.S. Air Force Air Combat Command has aggressively pursued revamping its organization to combat increasing threats, including cyber threats. The command is looking at how to unite its traditional air component capabilities with cyber mastery and provide its piece of Joint All Domain Command and Control, or JADC2.

These abilities are key especially as threats from adversaries are “only increasing in scope and scale,” said Lt. Gen. Christopher "Wedge" Weggeman, USAF, deputy commander, Air Combat Command (ACC), speaking at AFCEA Rocky Mountain Chapter’s Cyberspace Symposium 2020 in Colorado Springs on February 4.

December 16, 2019
By Kimberly Underwood
Master Sgt. Thomas Puckett, USAF, 7th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, Lightning Aircraft Maintenance Unit section chief, sends off an F-35 Lightning II fighter jet assigned to the 6th Weapons Squadron at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada. The Air Force has made the Shadow Operations Center at Nellis the location validating its Joint all-domain command and control. U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Andrew Sarver

The U.S. military is aggressively pursuing the ability to function in any domain, across the realms of sea, land, air, space and cyber, with Joint all-domain command and control enabling decision-making and operations.

For part of the Air Force’s contribution, the service will look to its Shadow Operations Center at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, as the place where it will validate the tactics needed for multidomain operations, including Joint all-domain command and control, Air Force leaders explained at recent AFCEA International events.

On December 1, the service connected key sensors to the center, activating initial existing capabilities, leaders announced recently.