JEDI

February 3, 2020
By Brandon Shopp
A U.S. Army soldier tests his battle systems in the field at Fort Polk, Louisiana. Credit: Army photo by Staff Sgt. Armando R. Limon, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division

Cloud computing can quicken U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) efforts toward information dominance, but agencies must be measured and deliberate in the march toward the cloud.

December 17, 2019
By Kimberly Underwood
The Defense Department’s new JEDI cloud platform will support warfighters on the tactical edge. U.S. Marines with Marine Aerial Refueler Transport Squadron 152 prepare for refueling during Exercise Yuma Horizon 19 at Imperial County Air Field, California, last January to maintain squadron capability in a forward-operating environment. U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Seth Rosenberg

Between now and Valentine’s Day, the U.S. Defense Department will begin to build out its unclassified department-wide cloud platform, the Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure cloud, known as JEDI. And approximately six months after that, DOD will stand up its secret cloud environment, followed later by the top secret cloud, all part of JEDI, reported Dana Deasy, Defense Department chief information officer, at the AFCEA Nova Chapter’s Air Force IT Day in Arlington, Va., last Thursday.

October 25, 2019
 

Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington, has been awarded a firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract with a ceiling value of $10,000,000,000 over a period of 10 years, if all options are exercised.  The JEDI Cloud contract will provide enterprise level, commercial infrastructure-as-a-service and platform-as-a-service to support Department of Defense business and mission operations. Work performance will take place at the awardee's place of performance.  Fiscal year 2020 operations and maintenance funds in the amount of $1,000,000 are being obligated on a task order against this award to cover the minimum guarantee. The expected completion date is October 24, 2029, if all options are exercised.  Washington Hea

October 10, 2018
Posted by: George I. Seffers
The outlook remains stormy for the Pentagon’s potential $10 billion cloud computing contract known as JEDI as technology giant IBM files a pre-award protest. Credit: 12019/Pixabay

IBM announced in a blog post that it has filed a pre-award protest against the Defense Department’s potential $10 billion Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure (JEDI)  cloud computing program. Proposals for the effort are due Friday, October 12.

Oracle filed a pre-award protest in August.

IBM’s blog post, written by Sam Gordy, general manager, IBM U.S. Federal, says that JEDI “as outlined in the final solicitation, would not provide the strongest possible foundation for the 21st century battlefield.”

August 7, 2018
Posted by George I. Seffers
Oracle has launched a formal protest against the U.S. Defense Department’s potential 10-year, $10 billion cloud computing contract commonly known as JEDI. Credit: Aichi8Seiran/Pixabay

Oracle, one of several companies vying for the U.S. Defense Department’s potential $10 billion, 10-year cloud computing contact known as the Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure (JEDI), launched a formal protest yesterday, less than two weeks after the Defense Department released its official solicitation for the contract.

Companies have until September 17 to respond to the request for proposals. The Government Accountability Office will issue its decision on the protest by November 14.

July 27, 2018
 

The U.S. Defense Department released the formal request for proposal (RFP) for the Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure (JEDI) cloud contract, seeking solicitations for cloud-related services.

"We are excited by the level of interest in JEDI Cloud and appreciate industry's participation throughout the draft solicitation process," DOD stated. "We are confident that these inputs helped us to refine and clarify the DOD's requirement represented in this RFP."