multi-domain operations

September 3, 2021
 

Leidos Inc., Reston, Virginia, is awarded a $49,417,035 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for the Multi-Domain Radar for a Contested Environment (MuDRaCE) effort. The Marines currently uses centralized, high power radio frequency radar assets to detect and target adversaries. These systems have limited mobility, are susceptible to detection and attack which represents a significant failure point. MuDRaCE seeks to provide greater interoperability, ease of integration with emerging technologies and improved sensor fusion-based situational awareness while maintaining legacy capability resulting in a robust survivable sensing network.

August 17, 2021
By George I. Seffers
Lt. Gen. John Morrison, USA, deputy chief of staff, G-6, speaks at TechNet Augusta 2021. Photo by Michael Carpenter

The U.S. is in the final stages of developing its unified network plans, according to Lt. Gen. John Morrison, USA, deputy chief of staff, G-6.

Gen. Morrison made the comments on the first day of the 2021 AFCEA TechNet Augusta conference in Augusta, Georgia, the organization’s first in-person conference since the coronavirus pandemic.

July 1, 2021
By George I. Seffers
An Army M1A2 Abrams tank participates in training at Fort Benning, Georgia, in January 2020. Army researchers are integrating the FIRESTORM AI-enabled decision-making aid with the Abrams, as well as a host of other systems.  Army Sgt. Joshua Wooten

With only months remaining before this fall’s Project Convergence 2021, U.S. Army researchers aim to integrate roughly 20 systems with the service’s fledgling artificial intelligence-enabled targeting technology known as FIRES Synchronization to Optimize Responses in Multi-Domain Operations.

June 7, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
The new strategy for Joint All-Domain Command and Control will bring together the “disparate communities within DoD to work together for a common cause,” says Lt. Gen. Dennis Crall, USMC, director, Command, Control, Communications and Computers/Cyber; and chief information officer, The Joint Staff (J-6), on Friday during a press conference at the Pentagon.

The U.S. military’s sweeping effort to build a common command and control system to unite warfighting across all domains—sea, land, air, space and cyberspace—now has a formal policy to guide its further development. Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin has officially signed off on the Joint All-Domain Command and Control (JADC2) strategy, reported Lt. Gen. Dennis Crall, USMC, director, Command, Control, Communications and Computers/Cyber; and chief information officer, The Joint Staff (J-6), on Friday during a press conference at the Pentagon.

June 8, 2021
By George I. Seffers
Soldiers test M1A2 Abrams tanks during a live-fire accuracy screening test at Fort Bliss, Texas, in October. U.S. Army researchers intend to integrate the FIRESTORM artificial intelligence system with the Abrams for Project Convergence 2021 to be held in October and November. Credit: Army Staff Sgt. Kris Bonet

Both soldiers and combat commanders likely will get hands-on experience in the coming months with one of the Army’s hottest new artificial intelligence systems known as FIRESTORM.

The artificial intelligence (AI)-enabled system, formally named FIRES Synchronization to Optimize Responses in Multi-Domain Operations, still is in the science and technology phase and is not yet a formal program of record. It ingests data from sensors and other systems, uses One World Terrain to map the battlefield and recommends the best weapon system to engage specific targets, saving commanders precious time for making decisions. Prior technologies took almost 20 minutes to relay data back to warfighters. FIRESTORM takes 32 seconds.

May 1, 2021
By George I. Seffers
Air Surveillance and Interface Control technicians provide radar, radio and tactical data links to support the Sentry Savannah exercise at Hunter Army Airfield in February 2016. The Joint Tactical Networking Center supports interoperability among the military services and seeks to add new waveforms to the Department of Defense Information Repository.  U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Airman Chelsea Smith/Released

Personnel with the U.S. Defense Department’s Joint Tactical Networking Center continually push to improve interoperability of waveforms used jointly across the military to save costs, enhance communications and ultimately fight more effectively.

April 13, 2021
Posted by: George I. Seffers
Army 1st Lt. Nancy Gomez fires an M777 howitzer during a direct-fire exercise at Grafenwoehr Training Area, Germany, Feb. 4, 2021. U.S. Army Europe and Africa will soon receive a new Multi-Domain Task Force and a Theater Fires Command, the Army has announced. Credit: Kevin Payne, Army

U.S. Army Europe and Africa will receive two new units—a Multi-Domain Task Force and Theater Fires Command—in the coming months and retain three sites previously scheduled to be returned to the German government due to growing operational requirements in the European theater.

The units will add approximately 500 Soldiers, 35 local national positions and 750 family members to U.S. Army Garrison Wiesbaden. The Theater Fires Command is expected to activate 16 Oct. 2021 and the Multi-Domain Task Force is expected to activate on 16 Sept. 2021. The sites that will be retained are Mainz Kastel Station and Mainz Kastel Housing in Mainz-Kastel, and Dagger Complex in Darmstadt.

March 26, 2021
By George I. Seffers
A soldier helps set up a tactical command post to test communications in Germany, July 8, 2019. The Army is releasing a flurry of documents, including a pending posture statement, outlining its modernization plans for 2035. Credit: Army Sgt. Patrick Jubrey

U.S. Army officials expect soon to release a multidomain operations (MDO) posture statement that will complement both the new MDO vision document released by the Army Chief of Staff and the posture statement from U.S. Cyber Command.

The MDO posture statement will detail how the Army intends to achieve its MDO vision for 2035. It will be released soon, possibly as early as April, according to Army officials conducting a March 26 telephonic media roundtable.

March 11, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
Speaking at the AFCEA Rocky Mountain Chapter’s Cyberspace Symposium on March 9, Maj. Gen. Kevin Huyck, director of operations, U.S. Northern Command, says the data-centric capabilities of Joint All Domain Command and Control, or JADC2, are a clear tool to not only defeat adversaries, but also to deter and deny actions before ever needing to engage in battle.

For the military commands that protect the United States on a 24/7 basis, the ability to have real-time information from a sophisticated sensor network is essential. Given the growing threats of U.S. adversaries to the homeland, the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) and the U.S. Northern Command (NORTHCOM) are already harnessing the capabilities that Joint All Domain Command and Control (JADC2) offers, including enhanced sensing, artificial intelligence, data integration and information convergence.

March 8, 2021
By George I. Seffers
A soldier fires an FGM-148 Javelin during live-fire training in Jordan, Aug. 27, 2019, as part of Eager Lion, a major U.S. Central Command exercise that aims to integrate forces in a multilateral environment. The Joint Communications Support Element supports all of the combatant commands, special operations forces and other departments and agencies and is modernizing to meet the demands of multi-domain operations. Credit: Army Spc. Shadrach Hicks

The Joint Communications Support Element (Airborne), which stays on standby to deploy anytime and anywhere within 72 hours, is modernizing for multi-domain operations.

February 1, 2021
By Robert K. Ackerman
A sailor keeps watch aboard the USS John S. McCain as the guided missile destroyer asserts navigational rights and freedoms under international law in the South China Sea near the Spratly Islands. The U.S. Indo-Pacific Command (INDOPACOM) routinely conducts freedom of navigation operations as part of its mission to ensure free and secure passage in the vast region.  7th Fleet

The push toward multidomain operations is geared toward meeting the multifaceted threat U.S. forces face worldwide, but its effects already are being felt in the Indo-Pacific region. Three nation-state adversaries, each with its own flavor of threat, are influencing U.S. efforts in that vast region to maintain peace and security.

January 12, 2021
 

AchieveIt Online LLC, Atlanta, Georgia (FA8612-21-D-0101); Aerocine Ventures Inc., Jackson Heights, New York (FA8612-21-D-0102); Aerovation Inc., Tucson, Arizona (FA8612-21-D-0103); AI.Reverie Inc., New York, New York (FA8612-21-D-0104); All Vision Technologies Inc., New York, New York (FA8612-21-D-0105); Allied Associates International Inc., Gainesville, Virginia (FA8612-21-D-0106); Aptima Inc., Woburn, Massachusetts (FA8612-21-D-0108); A-Tech Corp., Albuquerque, New Mexico (FA8612-21-D-0109); BlackHorse Solutions Inc., Herndon, Virginia (FA8612-21-D-0110); Charles River Analytics Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts (FA8612-21-D-0111); CIS Secure Computing Inc., Ashburn, Virginia (FA8612-21-D-0112); Cognitive Space Inc., Manvel, Texas (FA861

November 19, 2020
By Julianne Simpson
Credit: Shutterstock/K_E_N

The complexity of multidomain operations presents both challenges and opportunities in the effort to obtain an information advantage. To overcome these challenges and exploit the opportunities to gain an edge, the Army is modernizing.

November 1, 2020
By George I. Seffers
Soldiers assigned to 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team use satellite communication systems at the National Training Center, Fort Irwin, California, in March. Next summer, the Army intends to take its premier command, control, communications, cyber, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance experiment to the Indo-Pacific theater. It will mark the service’s first full-sized technology development experiment in a combat theater. Credit: U.S. Army/Pfc. Rosio Najera

When the U.S. Army conducts its Multi-Domain Operations Live experiment in the Indo-Pacific region next year, it will mark the first time the service has undertaken a full-scale technology development experiment in a combat theater. The goal is to assess technologies under the same conditions they will face in times of war, rather than in a stateside setting.

October 19, 2020
By George I. Seffers
The Department of Defense has selected a mobile power program from Army Futures Command to increase the speed at which on-the-move power capabilities are delivered to the battlefield. Credit: Army photo by Dan Lafontaine, CCDC C5ISR Center Public Affairs

U.S. Army researchers plan to demonstrate in December and March capabilities that could lead to a secure, mobile power grid capable of automatically providing electricity from the best available source, including batteries, vehicles or diesel generators.

October 2, 2020
Posted by: George I. Seffers
An Army paratrooper provides security during a mission in southeastern Afghanistan, Dec. 29, 2019. The service is discontinuing the Asymmetric Warfare Group and the Rapid Equipping Force as part of the shift from counterinsurgency operations to multi-domain operations. Photo by: Army Master Sgt. Alejandro Licea

The Department of the Army announced today the discontinuation of both the Asymmetric Warfare Group and the Rapid Equipping Force as the service transitions from counterinsurgency operations to a focus on multi-domain operations and large-scale combat operations.  

August 24, 2020
By George I. Seffers
In recent years, the Army's Cyber Blitz experiment evolved well beyond just cyber, allowing the service to define the integration of cyberspace, electronic warfare, intelligence, space and information operations. Beginning next year, the experiment will be known as Multi-Domain Operations Live. Photo by Spc. Marcus Gresham, USA

The U.S. Army’s technology assessment experiment known as Cyber Blitz has grown beyond its cyber roots. Beginning next year, when it will be held in the Indo-Pacific region, the exercise will be known as Multi-Domain Operations (MDO) Live.

August 1, 2020
By Kimberly Underwood
The Army is integrating Joint All Domain Command and Control capability as part of its tactical network modernization efforts. Credit: U.S. Army

The U.S. Army has spent the last two years pursuing a modernized integrated tactical network, or ITN, that supports increased mobility, resiliency and capabilities. Now, the service has a focus toward making sure that the modernization of that network can enable joint all-domain command and control, or the concept of JADC2. The service is preparing to fight seamlessly across the sea, land, air, space and cyberspace, or multidomain operations, by 2028.

August 1, 2020
By Kimberly Underwood
A U.S. Army soldier stands outside a Humvee before the start of the Dasman Shield live fire exercise in Kuwait in February. During the exercise, the military looked at the beginnings of all domain operations, including air-to-ground command control, as well as partner interoperability with Kuwaiti forces.  U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kevin Tanenbaum

The message from the intelligence community and top leaders of the U.S. military is clear. The nation is in near-peer competition, just underneath the level of outright war. As such, the U.S. military is investing in aligning its capabilities and functionality to fight as a Joint force seamlessly across the sea, air, land, space and cyberspace. Along with the other services, the U.S. Army is working to shape the approach of how the military will fight in the future under Joint all-domain operations.

July 14, 2020
By Kimberly Underwood
A U.S. Army M270 Multiple Launch Rocket System sits during a demonstration at the Grafenwoehr Training Area in Germany in February. The Army Futures Command is creating a software factory to train warfighters to code on the spot. Credit: U.S. Army photo by Spc. Denice Lopez

The U.S. Army Futures Command is preparing a software center designed to improve the digital competency of warfighters. The so-called software factory, in Austin, Texas, will take soldiers and civilians with a propensity toward software development and sharpen their skills. Warfighters facing near-peer threats and operating in a multidomain environment in the future may not have the ability to reach back to higher echelons for coding solutions or necessarily rely on contractor presence for software. They will need to be able to diagnose software issues of information technology that soldiers will be using the future as well as code specific solutions on the spot to support faster decision making.

December 16, 2019
By Kimberly Underwood
Master Sgt. Thomas Puckett, USAF, 7th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, Lightning Aircraft Maintenance Unit section chief, sends off an F-35 Lightning II fighter jet assigned to the 6th Weapons Squadron at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada. The Air Force has made the Shadow Operations Center at Nellis the location validating its Joint all-domain command and control. U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Andrew Sarver

The U.S. military is aggressively pursuing the ability to function in any domain, across the realms of sea, land, air, space and cyber, with Joint all-domain command and control enabling decision-making and operations.

For part of the Air Force’s contribution, the service will look to its Shadow Operations Center at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, as the place where it will validate the tactics needed for multidomain operations, including Joint all-domain command and control, Air Force leaders explained at recent AFCEA International events.

On December 1, the service connected key sensors to the center, activating initial existing capabilities, leaders announced recently.

November 15, 2019
By Kimberly Underwood
The U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command’s commanding general, Gen. Paul E. Funk , USA, speaks to soldiers at Ft. Benning, Georgia in September. How the Army trains its soldiers, especially its leaders, has to change to meet the demands of multidomain operations, he says. Army photo by Patrick A. Albright.

The ability to fight and win across any battlespace of air, land, sea, space or cyber is a necessary component of any successful future campaign, U.S. military leaders have indicated. And the ability to operate adroitly in such a manner needs to come straight from the top, from its leadership. However, the complexity inherent to multidomain operations will require tomorrow’s leaders to be more skillful than in any previous era, asserted Gen. Paul Funk, USA, commanding general, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command. Gen. Funk took over as the Command’s 17th leader in June.

November 14, 2019
By Kimberly Underwood
Lt. Gen. Robert F. Hedelund, USMC, commander, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command, speaks to Marines with the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Bataan during Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) in the Atlantic Ocean. U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Nathan Reyes

Multidomain operations (MDO) are not new for the U.S. military’s amphibious force. The Marine Corps approach of maneuver warfare “easily accommodates multidomain operations,” claimed Lt. Gen. Robert Hedelund, USMC, commander, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command and commanding general, Fleet Marine Force, Atlantic. “In fact, it is central to that requirement.”

October 16, 2019
By George I. Seffers
Army paratroopers sling-load a ground mobility vehicle to a CH-47 Chinook helicopter during a September 2019 Saber Junction exercise in Germany. Army officials intend to invest heavily in multidomain operations in the coming years. Credit: Army Sgt. Henry Villarama

The U.S. Army is committing to the multidomain operations (MDO) concept with a $700 million budget plan for fiscal years 2021-2025. The investment includes cyber, cloud and information warfare.

“Multidomain operations is our fighting concept, and it serves as the foundation of the Army Modernization Strategy. The MDO is how the Army supports the joint force in the rapid and continuous integration across all domains of warfare—land, sea, air, space and cyberspace—to ultimately deter, and win the fight should deterrence fail,” Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy told the audience at the Association of the United States Army annual conference in Washington, D.C.

October 17, 2019
By George I. Seffers
M1A2 Abrams tanks take part in a May 2019 exercise in Poland. U.S. Army officials plan a massive exercise, Defender-Europe early next year. It will be the largest of its kind in 25 years.  Photo Credit: Sgt. Thomas Mort

Defender-Europe 2020, a massive, first-of-its-kind exercise to take place next spring, will test the Army’s ability to rapidly project power forward, effectively operate with other nations and engage in multidomain operations, service officials revealed at the Association of the United States Army annual conference in Washington, D.C.

November 1, 2019
By Maj. Ryan Kenny, USA

When Google announced it was acquiring Nest for a little over $3 billion in 2014, analysts thought the company wanted to enter the home appliances market.

Wrong.

It was all about the data.

Google gained access to a treasure trove of information about consumer demands for heating and cooling. The company learned when people turned on their furnaces and shut off their air conditioners. Google could pair this information with the type of household, neighborhood and city.