NSEP

August 4, 2020
By Robert K. Ackerman
A COVID-19 patient is treated in a quarantine room by health care workers garbed in personal protective equipment. The pandemic has laid bare the shortcomings in U.S. national security emergency preparedness, and experts state that only a national effort will remedy the problem. Credit: Shutterstock/Mongkolchon Akesin

U.S. national security emergency plans are well documented with a disciplined approach, but their lack of coordination across agencies puts the United States in peril, say a group of government and industry experts. The country must begin to view national emergencies in a countrywide context instead of a narrow local or topical view, or else it will fall prey to whatever major crisis strikes next. The best way to do that is to build a comprehensive national security emergency preparedness (NSEP) capability that draws from lessons out of the Cold War and expertise from public/private partnerships. This also would be accompanied by a grading system that holds agencies accountable to Congress.