open architecture

July 26, 2021
By George I. Seffers
Program Executive Office for Command, Control, Communications-Tactical and the C5ISR Center integrate Stryker vehicles with the C5ISR/Electronic Warfare Modular Open Suite of Standards (CMOSS) capabilities during the Network Modernization Experiment (NetModX) 2021 from May to July, 2021 at the C5ISR Center’s Ground Activity, Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, New Jersey. Credit: U.S. Army photo by Kathryn Bailey, PEO C3T

The U.S. Army for the first time has demonstrated during its Network Modernization Experiment the integration of three capability cards—one for positioning, navigation and timing, another for mounted mission command, and a third for the TSM tactical communications waveform. The capabilities are associated with the service’s open suite of standards and were integrated onto a Stryker combat vehicle.

June 1, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
In its pursuit of open architecture solutions, the U.S. Navy has made “great strides” in applying the Mission Computer Alternative (MCA) platform, which is a Hardware Open Systems Technologies- (HOST-) conforming mission computer. The service is currently testing the MCA/HOST platform in its E-2D Advanced Hawkeye tactical airborne early warning aircraft and in its T-45 training aircraft (above)—and is considering how to advance the solutions to other platforms.  U.S. Navy photo

The U.S. military is using open architecture platforms on a greater scale, deploying interchangeable hardware and software systems to its major weapon programs. In particular, the Navy’s Naval Air Systems Command, known as NAVAIR, and its Program Executive Office, Aviation Common Systems and Commercial Services, are increasingly using flexible “systems of systems” in many of its major aviation programs. The application of open architecture is allowing the Navy—and the Defense Department—to consolidate common resources, decrease risk, reuse software, enhance maintenance abilities, reduce costs and increase tactical options.

April 7, 2021
 

The U.S. Navy selected Chantilly, Virginia-based VTG for the $188 million indefinite-delivery, indefinite-quantity Technical Insertion 16 (TI16) Sustainment, Installation, Procurement and Engineering Services contract with the Naval Surface Warfare Center Port Hueneme Division, a field activity of the Naval Sea Systems Command. The contract has a five-year period of performance. The TI16 program is the U.S. Navy’s enterprise approach to modernizing combat systems across the surface fleet—including for the Aegis Combat System—for all cruisers and destroyers, aircraft carriers and amphibious ships. TI16 also leverages commercial off-the-shelf technologies and open architecture designs for the combat systems.

March 29, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
Last July, pilots from the 1-229th Attack Reconnaissance Battalion, stationed at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington, train on the newest version of the Apache AH-64 helicopter during training conducted by Apache Program Manager, Program Executive Office Aviation (PEO Aviation). The PEO is standing up a new office to leverage open architecture systems on its aviation platforms. Credit: PEO Aviation photo by Capt. Joshua Hughes, USA, 1-229 Attack Reconnaissance Battalion.

The U.S. Army has pursued the development of open architecture system standards for several years and now is increasingly fielding such systems across its programs, including amongst its aviation and communications capabilities. The service, which worked with tri-service partners, the Navy and Air Force, will benefit from the systems being on the battlefield, as they cut costs, improve software reuse and portability, bring greater ease of use, and increase size, weight and power, or SWAP, savings, said Brig. Gen. Robert Collins, U.S. Army Program Executive Officer for Command, Control, Communications-Tactical (PEO C3T).

March 11, 2021
 

Keysight Technologies Inc., Colorado Springs, Colorado, has been awarded a $38,423,360 firm-fixed-price requirements contract for the purchase of Versatile Diagnostic Automatic Test Station (VDATS) kits. The VDATS is an organically designed test station with open architecture and virtual modular equipment extensions for instrumentation technology. The VDATS consists of standardized, commercially available test equipment, components and software. There are two configurations of VDATS, the Digital Analog (DA)-1 and DA-2. Currently, these configurations support the A-10, B-1, B-2, B-52, C-5, C-17, C-130, E-3, E-8C, F-15, F16, F-22, H-53, H-60, KC-135 MC-4, MQ-9, Navy ships and UH-1 weapon systems.

February 1, 2021
 

Teradyne Inc., North Reading, Massachusetts, has been awarded a $78,232,776 firm-fixed-price requirements contract for the purchase of Versatile Diagnostic Automatic Test Station (VDATS) kits.  The VDATS is an organically designed test station with open architecture and virtual modular equipment extensions for instrumentation technology. The VDATS consists of standardized, commercially available test equipment, components and software. There are two configurations of VDATS, the Digital Analog (DA)-1 and DA-2. Currently, these configurations support the A-10, B-1, B-2, B-52, C-5, C-17, C-130, E-3, E-8C, F-15, F16, F-22, H-53, H-60, KC-135 MC-4, MQ-9, Navy ships and UH-1 weapon systems.

December 18, 2020
By George I. Seffers
A soldier guides an M2A3 Bradley Fighting Vehicle during an exercise at Novo Selo Training Area, Bulgaria, in August 2018. On December 18, 2020, Army officials released a request for proposals for the Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle.   Credit: U.S. Army photo

Today, the U.S. Army issued the final request for proposals for the Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle (OMFV) concept design phase. The request for proposals asks for a common modular open architecture that will allow the rapid insertion of new software capabilities as they become available.