In-Q-Tel

September 1, 2019
By George I. Seffers
The CIA’s Directorate of Science and Technology’s claim to fame is its ability to combine technologies and capabilities across disciplines in ways that others cannot imagine and that make technology seem magical, says Dawn Meyerriecks, who leads the directorate. Pan Andrii and Titima Ongkantong/Shutterstock, edited by Chris D’Elia

If Hollywood were to create a movie about CIA human intelligence gathering, it would need to be more Mission Impossible than James Bond, more about teamwork and technical expertise than individual exploits, says Dawn Meyerriecks, who leads the agency’s Directorate of Science and Technology.

July 3, 2019
Posted by Kimberly Underwood
Thousands of British and French troops wait on the dunes of Dunkirk Beach, France, for transport to England during World War II, between May 26 and June 4, 1940. The Central Intelligence Agency cites the military evacuation of Dunkirk as the time its predecessor agency started depending on the private sector for key strategic intelligence. Credit: Shutterstock/Everett Historical

Charged with providing national security information to the nation, the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency, or CIA, has had a long history of partnering with the industry to solve challenges. That need has not diminished, said Randy Burkett, staff historian from the CIA’s Center for the Study of Intelligence. 

Burkett, speaking at a recent Foundation for Innovation and Discovery (FINND) event, walked attendees through a few of the agency’s historically interesting challenges in which the industry came to its aid, beginning at the start of World War II.