software development

October 28, 2020
By George I. Seffers
The Tactical Assault Kit (TAK) is a map-based software application that enables coordination among thousands of users with features such as a position data, chat, mission planning and shared overlays. Army researchers say it is being integrated with unmanned vehicles, virtual reality, wearable computers and heads up displays. Credit: U.S. Army CCDC C5ISR Center

The U.S. Army’s infinitely adaptable situational awareness tool created a decade ago continues to find new uses thanks to artificial intelligence, wearable computers, virtual reality, unmanned systems and other cutting-edge technologies.

The Tactical Assault Kit (TAK) is a map-based software application that enables coordination among thousands of users with features such as a position data, chat, mission planning and shared overlays. It is compatible with Android, Apple iOS and Windows. The Air Force, FBI, Secret Service, U.S. Park Police and Special Operations Forces are among the organizations that have customized it for their own purposes.

September 18, 2020
Posted by: Julianne Simpson
Members of AFC and ACC tour the future facilities of the Software Factory. Credit: ACC

The Army Futures Command (AFC) has named Austin Community College District (ACC) as the home for its new Software Factory. The first of its kind, the Software Factory at ACC will provide a training pipeline for soldiers and ACC students. It’s designed to help students rapidly scope and solve real-life problems through advanced software development processes.

August 19, 2020
By Kimberly Underwood
Speaking at a virtual luncheon of AFCEA's Alamo Chapter on August 19, Lt. Col. John Priestly, USAF, program director and material leader, Unified Platform Program; and director, LevelUp CodeWorks Software Factory, San Antonio, shares that he is seeing initial success at the cyber software factory, which is less than a year old.

Less than a year old, the San Antonio-based LevelUp Code Works Software Factory is succeeding in starting to “break the mold” of Defense Department software development. The factory, which had its grand opening last December, is providing key cyber-related products to U.S. military cyber organizations, says Lt. Col. John Priestly, program manager and materiel leader, Unified Platform Program; and director, LevelUp Code Works Software Factory.

August 18, 2020
 

Nalej Corp.,* Arlington, Virginia, and New York, New York, has been awarded a $14,865,391 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for a System of Systems Technology Integration Tool Chain for Heterogeneous Electronic Systems (STITCHES) Warfighter Applications Team (SWAT) development operations (DevOps) prototype. This contract provides for delivery of DevOps capabilities to the System of Systems Integration Technology and Experimentation (SoSITE) STITCHES platform managing DevOps toolchains in addition to providing a team dedicated to the effort.

July 14, 2020
By Kimberly Underwood
A U.S. Army M270 Multiple Launch Rocket System sits during a demonstration at the Grafenwoehr Training Area in Germany in February. The Army Futures Command is creating a software factory to train warfighters to code on the spot. Credit: U.S. Army photo by Spc. Denice Lopez

The U.S. Army Futures Command is preparing a software center designed to improve the digital competency of warfighters. The so-called software factory, in Austin, Texas, will take soldiers and civilians with a propensity toward software development and sharpen their skills. Warfighters facing near-peer threats and operating in a multidomain environment in the future may not have the ability to reach back to higher echelons for coding solutions or necessarily rely on contractor presence for software. They will need to be able to diagnose software issues of information technology that soldiers will be using the future as well as code specific solutions on the spot to support faster decision making.

March 16, 2020
By Capt. Jason Nunes
A drone operated by airmen flies over a training area at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, in October, while capturing aerial intelligence during a two-week military exercise. Software for unmanned systems goes through extensive and time-consuming testing, but machine learning could change that. Credit: Alejandro Pena, Air Force

A mushroom cloud explosion in the New Mexico desert on July 16, 1945 forever changed the nature of warfare. Science had given birth to weapons so powerful they could end humanity. To survive, the United States had to develop new strategies and policies that responsibly limited nuclear weapon proliferation and use. Warfare is again changing as modern militaries integrate autonomous and semiautonomous weapon systems into their arsenals. The United States must act swiftly to maximize the potential of these new technologies or risk losing its dominance.