Space Force

May 22, 2020
 

LinQuest Corp., Los Angeles, California, has been awarded an $11,008,552 firm-fixed-price modification (P00047) to contract FA8819-15-F-0001 for the Space and Missile Systems Center technical support follow-on task order bridge extension. This modification provides continued technical support services for the Special Programs Directorate, Los Angeles Air Force Base, California. Work will be performed at Los Angeles AFB, California, and is expected to be completed May 31, 2021. Fiscal 2020 operations and maintenance funds in the amount of $856,651; and fiscal 2020 research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $3,000,000 are obligated at the time of award. The U.S.

May 20, 2020
 

ManTech SRS Technologies Inc., Herndon, Virginia, has been awarded a $20,916,894 cost-plus-fixed-fee and firm-fixed-price modification (P00056) to contract FA8811-10-C-0002 for systems engineering and integration services. Work will be performed at Los Angeles Air Force Base, California; Vandenberg AFB, California; and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida. Work is expected to be completed September 22, 2020. Fiscal year 2020 procurement funds in the amount of $17,673,379; FY 2020 operations and maintenance funds in the amount of $1,503,797; and FY 2020 research development test and evaluation funds in the amount of $729,723 are being obligated at the time of award. Total cumulative face value of the contract modification and option

May 19, 2020
Posted by Kimberly Underwood
Credit: Shutterstock/Pogorelova Olga

The Space Force has announced that the planned satellite hacking challenge known as Space Security Challenge 2020: Hack-A-Sat would proceed as planned, but in a virtual format due to the pandemic. The Department of the Air Force and the Defense Digital Service's (DDS's) event includes an online qualification event May 22-24, followed by a final August 7-9. During the final, participants will attempt to reverse-engineer representative ground-based and on-orbit satellite system components to overcome planted “flags” or software code.

May 6, 2020
By Kimberly Underwood
Col. Laurel Walsh, 50th Operations Group commander (l), and Airman 1st Class Michael McCowan, satellite systems operator and mission planner, 2nd Space Operations Squadron, give the final command to decommission Satellite Vehicle Number-36 at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado in January. As part of steps to create a modern, agile U.S. Space Force, the new service is creating a data management governance council. Credit: U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Amanda Lovelace

The U.S. Space Force is pursuing a comprehensive data strategy, designed to harness data for strategic advantage. This next-generation data management effort is meant to be more of a precise engineering discipline—rather than an ad hoc organizational effort—and as such, includes the establishment of an associated governing body.

May 1, 2020
By Kimberly Underwood
U.S. Space Force’s Advanced Extremely High Frequency-6 (AEHF-6) communications system atop the United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket is moved to the launchpad at the Kennedy Space Center in preparation for its March 11, 2020, launch, the first for the new service. The Space Force will employ next-generation data management across all of its systems to make sure information, especially from satellite systems, is a powerful tool for the service.  United Launch Alliance

Unlike the other services, the military’s newest service, the U.S. Space Force, is starting with a chief data officer in place on day one of its existence. With an executive in place to guide how the service will administer its information, and with support from its top leadership, the service aims to have its data aid its strategic advantage.

April 20, 2020
By Kimberly Underwood
Gen. John "Jay" Raymond, USAF, chief, Space Operations, U.S. Space Force, testifies in March before the House Armed Services Committee in Washington, D.C. In a virtual town hall meeting on April 16, the general explained that the service will rely on the commercial satellite industry more than the military has in the past.    Credit: U.S. Air Force photo by Wayne Clark

The four-month-old U.S. Space Force is setting its priorities for the future, and part of that is a plan to leverage key partnerships with allies, the intelligence community and the commercial space industry. And while partnerships with the commercial space industry in regard to launch services have been quite visible, the Space Force is set to work more frequently with the producers of small communications satellite systems, said Gen. John “Jay” Raymond, USAF, chief of operations, U.S. Space Force.

April 17, 2020
By Kimberly Underwood
U.S. Space Force Chief of Space Operations Gen. John W. Raymond speaks at the Pentagon on March 27, 2020. The general, speaking at a virtual town hall on April 16, explains how the new service will pull together its personnel for its Force. Credit: U.S. Air Force photo by Wayne Clark

The U.S. Space Force is beginning to take shape. The new service is in the process of sorting out who moves to the Space Force and who will stay in the U.S. Air Force. The four-month-old service also will begin taking applicants to join its ranks from the other military services starting May 1, Gen. John “Jay” Raymond, USAF, chief of operations, U.S. Space Force, said in a virtual town hall on April 16. Any individual that wants to come over to the service has to get prior approval from its current service, he noted.

April 9, 2020
 

LinQuest Corp., Los Angeles, California, has been awarded a $14,287,826 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for support to the U.S. Space Command, a unified combatant command for space. This contract provides for non-personal services to accomplish the necessary functions to continue the development of the U.S. Space Command as directed by the President of the United States. Work will be performed at Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado; and Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, and is expected to be completed by April 21, 2021. The award is the result of a sole-source acquisition, and fiscal 2020 operations and maintenance funds in the amount of $3,000,000 are being obligated at the time of award. Headquarters U.S.

April 2, 2020
 

Monkton Inc., Vienna, Virginia, has been awarded a $500,000,000 hybrid firm-fixed-price, cost-reimbursable, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for the commercialization of mobile strategy. This contract provides for the technology and support necessary to enable the Department of Defense to rapidly design, develop and deploy mission enabling solutions to uniformed active duty members, reservist and civil servants that operate at the tactical edge. Work will be performed in Tysons, Virginia, and is expected to be completed by October 1, 2025. This award is the result of a Small Business Innovation Research (SIBR) Program and is a Phase III award directly born from Monkton Inc.'s SBIR Phase I award. Fiscal 2020 operations and

February 13, 2020
Posted by Kimberly Underwood
The Space and Missile Systems Center’s fifth Advanced Extreme High Frequency satellite, AEHF-5, in the faring of United Launch Alliance’s Atlas V vehicle, launches last August at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The center has moved control of the satellite to the new Space Operations Command. Credit: SMC

The Space and Missile Systems Center has transferred its fifth Advanced Extremely High Frequency satellite to the new Space Operations Command. Both the center, known as SMC, and the command, known as SpOC, fall under the new U.S. Space Force. Operators from SpOC at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, will now retain control authority for the key military satellite communications capability, the center reported on February 12.

February 7, 2020
By Kimberly Underwood
“Defensive cyber operations will be our number one priority,” says Brig. Gen. Joseph Matos, USMC, J-6, U.S. Space Command, speaking of the command’s vital role in defending U.S. space-based assets and operations.

Last August 30, the U.S. Space Command become the 11th unified combatant command of the U.S. Department of Defense. In that role, the command will be conducting defensive, and when necessary, offensive cyber capabilities to protect key space-based assets and guard its part of the military’s network, called the DODIN.

December 20, 2019
By Kimberly Underwood
Defense Secretary Mark Esper and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark Milley, USA, speak with Maj. Gen. Brian Winski, USA, commanding general, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) & Fort Campbell, near Bastogne, Belgium, on December 16 as part of the events for the 75th anniversary of the Battle of the Bulge. The leaders announced today the official creation of the U.S. Space Force, the newest branch of the military in 70 years. DOD photo by Lisa Ferdinando

For the first time in 70 years, the U.S. military will be adding another service to its organization, the Space Force. The move becomes official with the signing of the S. 1790, the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2020 by the president later today, announced Secretary of Defense Mark Esper and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Army Gen. Mark Milley, USA. The top two military leaders briefed the press at the Pentagon and broadcasted the event online December 20.

October 17, 2019
By Kimberly Underwood
An Atlas V rocket carrying a Space-Based Infrared System Geosynchronous Earth Orbit satellite for an Air Force mission lifts off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, in January. DOD is proposing the creation of the U.S. Space Force to protect the space domain. Credit: United Launch Alliance

To build the Space Force, the proposed sixth service of the U.S. military, the Defense Department will initially pull from all the services, not just the Air Force, according to Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Space Policy Steve Kitay. It will truly be a joint warfighting service, he stressed.