Spring Intelligence Symposium 2021 Coverage

May 27, 2021
By George I. Seffers
The U.S. Defense Department's shift from network centricity to data centricity is a bona fide paradigm shift, according to a panel of experts. Credit: SergeyBitos/Shutterstock

The U.S. military’s concept for Joint All-Domain Command and Control (JADC2) begins with intelligence data, and data-centric operations will require profound changes, according to a panel of experts.

May 27, 2021
By Robert K. Ackerman
The acquisition process for defense and intelligence needs to be revamped for innovation to be sped to the force quickly enough to meet the growing Chinese challenge. Credit: specnaz/Shutterstock

The budget and acquisition process is poised to fail both the Defense Department and the intelligence community just as they face major geopolitical challenges. China’s push to world domination requires better and faster technologies to maintain U.S. force and intelligence superiority, but the current system is ill-structured to meet that challenge.

May 27, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
Gen. Paul Nakasone, USA, commander, U.S. Cyber Command; director, National Security Agency; and chief, Central Security Service, pictured speaking in 2019 with cyber soldiers assigned Fort Meade, expects an increase in the number of cyber teams deployed at the request of foreign governments to help defend against cyber marauders. Credit: Steven Stover, 780th Military Intelligence Brigade (Cyber)

The U.S. Cyber Command, at the invitation of foreign governments, sends teams of cyber warriors overseas to aid in the search for, analysis of and protection against adversaries conducting cyber warfare.

While U.S. forces frequently deploy overseas, this is a different kind of military support. Instead of taking tanks, helicopters and ships, the U.S. military sends its cyber warriors, armed with their adroit offensive and defensive skills and digital tools.

May 26, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
The intelligence community is stepping up its use of contract vehicles and partnerships with industry as part of its R&D cycles to bring in more innovative technologies. Credit: Shutterstock/Gorodenkoff

A new federal lab at the CIA has come out of the shadows, moving from “stealth mode” to posting and accepting public solicitations to capitalize on emerging technologies from industry and academia. The agency has added a public website with technology development information and is in the process of setting up intellectual property protections, explained Dan Wang, director of CIA Federal Labs.

May 26, 2021
By Robert K. Ackerman
U.S. warfighters in future conflicts may not have the intelligence support they need unless the intelligence environment undergoes a restructuring to face large peer rivals. Credit: Gorodenkoff/Shutterstock

Future U.S. conflicts will be totally different from recent confrontations, and the U.S. intelligence environment is ill-suited for the scope and range of activities that will be required to support U.S. warfighters, said an intelligence community expert. Upgrading U.S. intelligence will require major leaps in technology as well as restructuring to face enemies that are far more capable over larger distances.

May 26, 2021
By George I. Seffers
An IARPA project may one day allow whole-body biometric identification from long range, such as from unmanned aerial vehicles. Credit: Oleg Yarko/Shutterstock

The U.S. intelligence community is embracing a number of emerging technologies, including artificial intelligence, biotechnologies, advanced materials and advanced communication systems, officials from the Office of the Director of Intelligence (ODNI) told the audience at AFCEA’s virtual Spring Intelligence Symposium, held May 25-27.

May 25, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
Operating for just about 7 months, the Analysis and Resilience Center for Systemic Risk, or ARC, has a unique role in helping to protect industry-owned assets that have implications to national security if attacked by cybermauraders. Credit: Shutterstock/xtock

Stood up last October—the Analysis and Resilience Center for Systemic Risk (ARC), a nonprofit, Arlington-Virginia-based organization—helps to protect the nation’s infrastructure by assessing the endemic cybersecurity risks to the critical energy, financial and other private sectors. A 2013 executive order identified some assets—on which the U.S. government relies but reside in the private sector—that if compromised by cyber attack could have a catastrophic impact on national security.