U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command

July 16, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
The U.S. Army’s Combat Capabilities Development Command C5ISR Center and other Army partners prepare for the Network Modernization Experiment 21 event by readying vehicles and equipment for the event held at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, New Jersey in May. Credit: Jasmyne Douglas, Joint Base McGuire Dix Lakehurst PAO Office

The U.S. Army is employing blockchain-related capabilities to provide information trust on the future battlefield. The advanced solution, being developed in support of to be part of the Program Executive Office Command Control Communications-Tactical, or PEO C3T, Capability Sets 25 and 27, also relies on machine learning and zero trust applications. Computer engineers at the service’s tactical communications research and development arm, the Combat Capabilities Development Command C5ISR Center, at Aberdeen, Maryland, tested the solution in May during the Network Modernization Experiment 21 (NetModX 21), held at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, New Jersey.

April 6, 2021
 

The U.S. Army selected Reston, Virginia-based Science Applications International Corp. for a $800 million cost plus fixed-fee, single-award contract to provide engineering and professional support services to the Army Combat Capabilities Development Command, Aviation & Missile Center, Software, Simulation, Systems Engineering and Integration Directorate.

June 2, 2020
 

Brig. Gen. James P. Bienlien, USA, has been assigned as deputy commanding general, Combat Capabilities Development Command, and senior commander, Natick Soldier Systems Center, U.S. Army Futures Command, Natick, Massachusetts.

September 11, 2019
 
Computer scientists at the U.S. Army¹s Combat Capabilities Development Command at Aberdeen Proving Ground are working on biometric software systems to combat so-called "deepfake" or bogus media. Credit: Shutterstock/meyer_solutions

At the Combat Capabilities Development Command at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, researchers in the Science and Technology Directorate are working to meet a joint urgent operational needs statement regarding biometric dominance. The directorate’s Intelligence Systems and Processing Division is creating two biometric systems, called VICE and VIBES, to protect warfighters as well as discern media fakes, explained Keith Riser, computer scientist, Intelligence Systems and Processing Division, Intelligence and Information Warfare Directorate. 

September 1, 2019
By Kimberly Underwood
Synthetic biology is a top priority for the Army as well as the Defense Department, says Bryn Adams, research biologist, Army Research Laboratory.  ARL

The synthetic biology-related work that scientists at the Army Research Laboratory are performing may seem as if it is taken from a science fiction novel: harnessing the DNA of microbes to engineer military solutions such as self-healing paint on a tank. But to support soldiers of the future, this may be what is needed, a researcher says. The Army has to prepare soldiers to fight in multidomain operations across dense urban environments, megacities or austere environments, and synthetic biology capabilities could provide fuel sources, protective coatings, food or other necessities.