SIGNAL Coverage: WEST 2018


Real-time coverage from WEST 2018, including blog posts, news and photos, all in one place. SIGNAL provides highlights and breaking news from speakers and panelists.

Latest Event Coverage

A Sea Change Moment for the Sea Services

The heads of the three U.S. sea services (from l)—Adm. Paul F. Zukunft, USCG, Gen. Robert B. Neller, USMC, and Adm. John M. Richardson, USN—discuss the challenges they face in a town hall session moderated by Adm. James G. Stavridis, USN (Ret.), at West 2018.  Michael Carpenter

Money might buy badly needed fleet upgrades, but it won’t buy fixes for problems that have been building in the sea services over the past decade.

 

Constrained Brains No Match for Machines

The AlphaGo Zero initiative exceeded human level of play in the game of Go, with the machine playing itself and learning how to win from its own experience. Credit: Saran Poroong, Shutterstock

From robots, to simulations to self-training algorithms and beyond, AI will change tactics, strategies and outcomes across the globe.

 

Navy Veers Away From Linear Modernization

Sea service leaders addressing challenges and opportunities in a town hall format are (l-r) Adm. Paul F. Zukunft, USCG, commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard; Adm. John M. Richardson, USN, chief of naval operations; Gen. Robert B. Neller, USMC, commandant, U.S. Marine Corps; along with moderator Adm. James Stavridis, USN (Ret.), dean, The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University.

Replacing older maritime assets must be teamed with a host of new capabilities and doctrines.

 

More Funding Not a Cure-all for Sea Services

From l-r, Adm. Paul F. Zukunft, USCG, commandant, U.S. Coast Guard; Gen. Robert B. Neller, USMC, commandant, U.S. Marine Corps; and  Adm. John M. Richardson, USN, chief of naval operations, discuss sea service challenges and opportunities in a town hall forum moderated by Adm. James G. Stavridis, USN (Ret.), dean, The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University.

Money alone can't buy modernization as the sea services confront a range of internal and external challenges.

 

Hyperwar Is Coming Faster Than You Think

Hyperwar and its ramifications were the subject of a West 2018 panel comprising (r-l) Capt. Sean Heritage, USN, Navy and IT portfolio lead, DIUx; Amir Husain, founder and CEO, SparkCognition; August Cole, senior fellow, Avascent/Atlantic Council; and panel moderator Capt. David Adams, USN (Ret.), program manager, Western Pacific Oceaneering.

Powered by AI, hyperwar will change the conflict equation.

 

Decentralization Key to Navy Acquisition Reform

James F. Geurts, assistant secretary of the Navy for research, development and acquisition, offers solutions to vexing acquisition challenges at West 2018.

The Navy's new acquisition strategy: Let program managers manage their programs.

 

The Competition to Innovate Better Than Adversaries

Vice Adm. Jan Tighe, USN, deputy chief of Naval Operations for Information Warfare (N2N6), reviews the complexity of information warfare.

The U.S. military finds itself challenged by peers and near-peers.

 

Information Warfare Begs Definition

Vice Adm. Jan Tighe, USN, deputy chief of Naval Operations for Information Warfare (N2N6), describes the challenges facing Navy information warfare during her keynote luncheon speech at West 2018.

The U.S. Navy faces diverse—and changing—challenges in information warfare.

 

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Related Coverage

Warships Set to Make Waves With Powerful Lasers

The Navy is adding high-energy lasers to the fleet aboard the DDG 51 Flight IIA “in the shortest time frame possible,” says a Naval Sea Systems Command spokesperson.

After many years of development, the Navy is moving rapidly to deploy advanced laser capabilities in the near term to the fleet.

 

Data Is the New Driver of the Fleet

The USS Porter transits the Strait of Messina in the Mediterranean. The Navy is increasing its emphasis on information warfare (IW) as it integrates the capability with air, surface and subsurface operations.

The ability of the U.S. Navy to maneuver during combat will soon be as important in the airwaves as it is in the air and the waves.

 

Marine Corps Lab Imagines Weapons of the Future

Marines exit a vehicle onto the beach during a recent amphibious landing exercise at Kin Blue Beach in Okinawa, Japan. The Marines need advanced technologies that will not limit their mobility.

How does the U.S. Marine Corps repel daily threats? With sound strategies as well as direction, preparation, doctrine and of course innovation.

 

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Photos from WEST