Army Research Lab

November 1, 2020
By Nicholas A. Strnad and Lt. Col. Elizabeth Agapios, USA
Army scientists explore materials at the nanolevel with the goal of finding stronger or more heat-resistant properties to support the Army of the future. Credit: U.S. Army photo by David McNallyArmy scientists explore materials at the nanolevel with the goal of finding stronger or more heat-resistant properties to support the Army of the future. Credit: U.S. Army photo by David McNally

Nanotechnology continues its march through the field of electronics, enabling faster and more energy-efficient computer processors, larger computer memory density and increased battery capacity. These ever-shrinking micro and nanodevices require advanced manufacturing methods to produce. Atomic-scale processing refers to a collection of these methods that may be used to deposit and remove material at the smallest scales, a single atomic layer at a time.

December 1, 2019
By Kimberly Underwood
Roboticists at the Army Research Lab are pulling together components for robots to be able to take verbal instruction from soldiers and then complete a series of complex tasks. Here, the robot acts as a forward observer, detects a possible enemy position and relays the information to the soldier, who plans their next move.  CCDC ARL

Scientists at the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command Army Research Laboratory in Adelphi, Maryland, are preparing robots that can talk with soldiers, navigate in a “socially compliant” manner and learn from demonstration. The effort to enable robots to take verbal instruction, complete a series of complex tasks and maneuver in the same environments as soldiers is all part of the Army’s long-term endeavor to create fully skilled battlefield operators that work with warfighters, say Ethan Stump and John Rogers, roboticists at the Army Research Lab (ARL).

January 1, 2016
By George I. Seffers
A U.S. Army soldier kneels atop a cliff overlooking the Arghandab River Valley in Afghanistan to provide security for his squad members as they climb up the cliff from the valley below. Army researchers aim to identify and develop persistent intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance technologies to provide tactical-edge warfighters the data they need for rapid-fire decision making.

U.S. Army researchers recently kicked off a concept development effort designed to improve the ability to monitor an area for long periods, enhancing the means to provide soldiers at the tactical edge with the critical situational awareness intelligence needed for rapid-fire decision making.

July 16, 2012
By George Seffers

STG Incorporated, Reston, Virginia, was awarded a $10,850,829 firm-fixed-price level-of-effort contract for the information technology services in support of the Army Research Laboratory. The U.S. Army Contracting Command, Adelphi, Maryland, is the contracting activity.