Army Technet

August 1, 2017
By George I. Seffers
The Army is well on its way to modernizing networks, including moving toward cloud computing, mobile devices and data center consolidation, and fielding the Home Station Mission Command Center.

The U.S. military must adopt a software-defined network to improve agility, flexibility and interoperability with international partners while keeping pace with technological changes, says Lt. Gen. Robert Ferrell, USA (Ret.), former Army chief information officer/G-6.

Owning every piece of hardware is no longer necessary or feasible, says the general, who retired in May. “This legacy environment that we have that is now hardware-based is not going to cut it,” he asserts.

A software-defined network offers a number of benefits, but getting there is no easy task, Gen. Ferrell indicates. “The software-defined network is the way to go, but that’s going to take some time to move in that direction,” he says.

August 1, 2017
By Robert K. Ackerman
A soldier with the 780th Military Intelligence Brigade sets up cyber tools at the National Training Center as part of the U.S. Army’s cyber electromagnetic activities (CEMA) initiative led by Army Cyber Command. The service is consolidating electronic warfare and cyber training and operations at Fort Gordon, Georgia, facilities to integrate all aspects of the disciplines.

The U.S. Army is consolidating major electronics disciplines in an approach that brings education and operations under a single umbrella. This confluence extends to physical plants as well as organizational charts. For example, the Cyber Center of Excellence at Fort Gordon, Georgia, is co-located with its operational counterpart to meld the identities of theory and practice.

June 29, 2017
By Sandra Jontz
U.S. Army Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Milley, USA, visits soldiers serving with the cyber electromagnetic activities (CEMA) support to corps and below (CSCB) team, 780th Military Intelligence Brigade, in May at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Chuck Burden, USA

The U.S. Army is serious about the narrative that it is serious about cyber. The service has put its organizational architecture on the line by prioritizing the newest warfighting domain while converging it with long-extant but re-emerging combat disciplines, a senior leader says.