artificial intelligence

October 7, 2019
Posted by Julianne Simpson
Credit: Lemberg Vector studio

A new study shows that robots could be taught to recognize human emotions from the way people move.

Researchers from Warwick Business School, University of Plymouth, Donders Centre for Cognition at Radboud University in the Netherlands, and the Bristol Robotics Lab at the University of the West of England, found humans could recognize excitement, sadness and aggression from the way people moved, even if they could not see their facial expressions or hear their voice.

October 4, 2019
Posted by George I. Seffers
A new policy approved by the secretary of the Army requires the use of advanced manufacturing techniques, which included 3D printing, for new and existing systems. Credit: Pixabay/mebner1

Secretary of the Army Ryan D. McCarthy has approved a new policy on advanced manufacturing designed to help the Army secure a competitive edge against near-peer adversaries.

September 27, 2019
 
Students from the Autonomy New Mexico program at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque developed drone platforms in order to test hypersonic system applications. Credit: Vince Gasparich

As part of Sandia National Laboratories' quest to develop hypersonic solutions, a group of university students working at the labs this summer developed autonomy and artificial intelligence capabilities for hypersonic flight systems. They tested the capabilities on unmanned aerial vehicles, or UAVs.

September 10, 2019
 

The Navy awarded the University of California, Berkeley, California, a $9,477,951 cooperative research agreement to study learning mechanisms to create computational models and enhance artificial intelligence approaches to learning, such as deep learning and reinforcement learning. All work will be performed at the University of California, Berkeley, California. This four-year agreement has no option periods. The period of performance is from September 9, 2019, through September 8, 2023. Fiscal year 2019 research, development, test and evaluation funds (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) in the amount of $1,477,559 will be obligated at the time of award.

September 1, 2019
By George I. Seffers
The CIA’s Directorate of Science and Technology’s claim to fame is its ability to combine technologies and capabilities across disciplines in ways that others cannot imagine and that make technology seem magical, says Dawn Meyerriecks, who leads the directorate. Pan Andrii and Titima Ongkantong/Shutterstock, edited by Chris D’Elia

If Hollywood were to create a movie about CIA human intelligence gathering, it would need to be more Mission Impossible than James Bond, more about teamwork and technical expertise than individual exploits, says Dawn Meyerriecks, who leads the agency’s Directorate of Science and Technology.

September 1, 2019
By Robert K. Ackerman
Credit: Sergey Cherviakov/Shutterstock

From the outer space environment of the moon to the virtual realm of cyberspace, technology challenges have the potential to vex the intelligence community. Many of the tools that the community is counting on to accomplish its future mission can be co-opted or adopted by adversaries well-schooled in basic scientific disciplines. So U.S. intelligence officials must move at warp speed to develop innovations that give them an advantage over adversaries while concurrently denying foes the use of the same innovations against the United States.

September 1, 2019
By Kimberly Underwood
The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency is working to use traditional tools, such as geographic information systems, in new ways to provide geospatial intelligence to the Defense Department and the intelligence community.  Shutterstock/Ammit Jack

Threats to the United States from across the world are more frequent and persistent, from nation-state actors to terrorists to rogue players. As a result, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, a combat support agency that provides key imagery, intelligence and geospatial information to the Defense Department and to the intelligence community, has had to change some aspects of its tradecraft, says Susan Kalweit, director of analysis at the agency known as the NGA.

August 15, 2019
Posted by Kimberly Underwood
The U.S. Defense Department’s Defense Innovation Unit is sponsoring a new competition to help advance artificial intelligence solutions for disaster relief. Credit: DIU

The U.S. Department of Defense, through its emerging technology arm, Defense Innovation Unit, known as DIU, is conducting an artificial intelligence challenge to lighten the load of analysts pouring through satellite and aerial imagery to conduct damage assessments after natural disasters.

The new competition, known as the DIU xView2 Challenge, is the organization’s second prize challenge focusing on advancing computer vision for humanitarian assistance and disaster relief, DIU reported. It follows the xView1 Challenge, held earlier this year to advance machine learning capabilities that could identify objects on the ground useful to first responders.

August 13, 2019
By Robert K. Ackerman
Credit: Segey Cherviakov/Shutterstock

At the top of the list of the tools that the U.S. intelligence community is expecting to help accomplish its future mission is artificial intelligence, or AI. It is being counted on to help the collection and sorting of the large amounts of data that are growing exponentially. However, like many of these tools, AI can be co-opted or adopted by adversaries well-schooled in basic scientific disciplines. As a result, AI can be a trap for unwitting intelligence officials, offers Bob Gourley, co-founder and chief technology officer of OODA LLC.

July 31, 2019
 

Two Six Labs LLC,* Arlington, Virginia, has been awarded a $95,119,268 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for project IKE. The objective of IKE is to develop automated artificial intelligence/machine learning techniques to assist human understanding of the cyber battlespace, support development of cyber warfare strategies and measure and model battle damage assessment. Work will be performed in Arlington, Virginia, and is expected to be completed by July 30, 2024. This award is the result of a competitive acquisition with two offers received. Fiscal year 2019 research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $1,400,000 are being obligated at time of award.

August 6, 2019
 

The University of Southern California (USC), Los Angeles, California, is awarded a $9,338,631 cooperative research agreement to research development of an artificial intelligence system that acquires machine common sense through observation from images, video and text by absorbing knowledge from both manually created sources and by human guidance. This research seeks capabilities that can enable artificial intelligence agents to support search and rescue efforts, autonomous vehicle navigation in unfamiliar terrain and machines that can adapt to unforeseen circumstances. This is a four-year contract with no options. Work will be performed at USC in Los Angeles, California, and is expected to be completed Aug. 4, 2023.

July 17, 2019
Posted by George I. Seffers
U.S. Cyber Command officials recently released a list of tough technical challenges areas, for which solutions may not yet exist. Credit: DR MANAGER/Shutterstock

The U.S. Cyber Command has released a list of 39 challenge problems fitting under 12 categories: vulnerabilities, malware, analytics, implant, situational awareness, capability development, persona, hunt, mission management, attack, security and blockchain.

August 1, 2019
By Robert K. Ackerman
A soldier operates systems in a simulated tank while scientists at the Army Research Laboratory (ARL) monitor his brain waves. This work by the ARL’s Combat Capabilities Development Center seeks to establish how artificial intelligence can be employed to address a soldier’s needs by determining changes in the human’s mood.  ARL photo

A future iteration of artificial intelligence would measure a soldier’s cognitive and physical state and trigger actions that would support, or even save, the individual in combat. These actions might direct the human on a different course, or ultimately initiate activities that complete the soldier’s mission or protect the individual in combat.

July 24, 2019
By Steve Orrin
To reap the benefits of AI, the Defense Department must first tackle challenges with people, processes and infrastructure. Credit: Laurent T/Shutterstock

When it comes to artificial intelligence (AI), the Department of Defense (DOD) has put a firm stake in the ground. The department’s AI strategy clearly calls for the DOD “to accelerate the adoption of AI and the creation of a force fit for our time.”

July 17, 2019
By Robert K. Ackerman
Scientists at the Army Research Laboratory (ARL) monitor a soldier’s brainwaves as he operates systems in a simulated tank. The work seeks to understand thought patterns and physical states during combat pursuant to teaming the soldier with artificial intelligence.

U.S. Army scientists are learning more about how the human brain functions so they can team its bearer with artificial intelligence (AI). The goal is for AI to understand a soldier’s moods and feelings and adjust its own actions accordingly.

Researchers aim for a future iteration of AI that would measure a soldier’s cognitive and physical state and trigger actions that would support, or even save, the individual in combat. These actions might direct the human on a different course, or ultimately initiate activities that complete the soldier’s mission or protect the individual in combat.

July 17, 2019
Posted by Kimberly Underwood
Dana Deasy, the Defense Department’s CIO, pictured speaking at AFCEA’s 2018 Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium in Baltimore, is stressing the role of cloud and artificial intelligence as part of DOD’s new Digital Modernization Strategy. Credit: Michael Carpenter

On Friday, the Defense Department released its DOD Digital Modernization Strategy, aiming to greatly improve the military’s digital environment. The strategy aims to modernize the DOD’s joint information enterprise environment by advancing its fixed and mobile networking capabilities,; DOD-wide enterprise information technology (IT) services, coordinated technology refresh efforts, joint cybersecurity capability and access to data.

July 11, 2019
Posted by Kimberly Underwood
The Navy is pursuing machine learning-based cyber security through a new $100,000 prize challenge. Credit: U.S. Navy illustration by Frances Zukowski

The Navy is seeking advanced cybersecurity solutions based on artificial intelligence and machine learning technologies, the Naval Information Warfare Systems Command announced in a recent statement.

The Command, known now as NAVWAR, and the Program Executive Office for Command, Control, Communications, Computers and Intelligence (PEO C4I) are co-sponsoring the so-called Artificial Intelligence Applications to Autonomous Cybersecurity Challenge (AI ATAC).

June 26, 2019
By Kimberly Underwood
Ron Schmelzer and Kathleen Walch (r), who both are managing partners and principal analysts at Cognilytica and spoke at the recent AI World Government conference, advise that not every information technology problem can be solved by using artificial intelligence systems.

With the explosion of artificial intelligence onto the computing scene again, the hype about the technology continues to grow. Making sense of how to employ artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) can still be difficult, however, experts reasoned Monday at the AI World Government conference, held in Washington, D.C., June 24-26.

June 24, 2019
Posted by Gopika Ramesh
The Stampede supercomputer at the Texas Advanced Computing Center at the University of Texas in Austin is funded by the NSF and specializes in high performance research and development and data analysis. Credit: Texas Advanced Computing Center

Artificial intelligence (AI) research has enabled breakthroughs across almost every sector. The National Science Foundation (NSF), a leading funder of activities that support AI research and innovation, is joining other federal agency partners to announce the release of the 2019 update to the National Artificial Intelligence (AI) Research and Development (R&D) Strategic Plan.

The strategic plan was developed by the Select Committee on AI of the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC). The 2019 plan offers a national agenda on AI science and engineering.

May 31, 2109
By Maryann Lawlor
Artificial intelligence and machine learning are still technically in their infancy. Both show promise in the military and government arenas, but experts still have many questions.

Artificial intelligence and machine learning techniques could help information and network defenders recognize patterns of potential attackers so their next moves can be proactively blocked. In addition, cyber tools enhanced with these capabilities could provide a much more detailed picture of the cyber battlefield and increase the potential of success in a cyber campaign. This knowledge would complement the kinetic battlefield and could permit war planners to choose the appropriate mix of cyber and kinetic operations.

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