artificial intelligence

February 15, 2019
By George I. Seffers
Adm. Christopher Grady, USN, U.S. Fleet Forces commander, speaks at West 2019.

The U.S. Navy is in the nascent stages of a plan to revolutionize readiness through the use of artificial intelligence, machine learning and data analytics. It also may include the establishment of two new offices: a chief readiness office and an analytics office.

February 15, 2019
By George I. Seffers
Rear Adm. Boris Becker, commander of the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center, speaks during a panel at West 2019. Photo by Michael Carpenter

Artificial intelligence, machine learning, advanced manufacturing, blockchain, 5G, the Internet of Things, quantum computing, data science, cloud computing and cybersecurity all have one thing in common: information.

Rear Adm. Boris Becker, USN, commander of the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center, made that point during a panel session at the AFCEA-USNI West 2019 Conference in San Diego. “It’s information in warfare and information as warfare,” he added.

February 14, 2019
By Kimberly Underwood
The Defense Department has released a strategy to implement artificial intelligence, as it expects the technology has the potential to transform its military functions positively. Credit: Shutterstock/Valerii Iavtushenko

To maintain its strategic position in the world, succeed on future battlefields and protect the homeland, the Department of Defense must increase the adoption of artificial intelligence, according to the department’s newly released Artificial Intelligence Strategy.

February 13, 2019
By George I. Seffers
Brig. Gen. Dennis Crall, USMC, deputy principal cyber advisor, Office of the Secretary of Defense, speaks at the National Security Technology Forum and Exposition in San Diego. Photo by Michael Carpenter

Last year the U.S. Defense Department released a cyber strategy and followed that with posture review that identified more than 90 gaps in cybersecurity capabilities, many of which were determined to be critical shortcomings. This year, officials expect to begin implementing the strategy, beginning with several priority areas involving endpoint management, network visibility, user authentication and cyber force development, according to Brig. Gen. Dennis Crall, USMC, deputy principal cyber advisor, Office of the Secretary of Defense.

February 6, 2018
by Kimberly Underwood

Machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) technologies can be used by DOD to gain a competitive advantage, especially in cyberspace operations. While the technology has made it easier for the military to operate and communicate, “It has also a unique set of challenges with dependencies and vulnerabilities for the department, our nation, our economy and our everyday lives,” said Vice Adm. Nancy Norton, USN, director of the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) and commander, Joint Force Headquarters–Department of Defense Information Network (JFHQ-DODIN). The admiral presented the keynote luncheon address at the AFCEA Rocky Mountain Cyberspace Symposium on February 5 and spoke to SIGNAL Magazine.

February 1, 2019
By George I. Seffers
A U.S. Air Force F-15E Strike Eagle, center, a Royal Air Force F-35 Lightning II, left, and a French air force Dassault Rafale fly behind a U.S. Air Force KC-135 Stratotanker over the English Channel, during a November 2018 multinational training exercise. The Air Force is developing and fielding a new mission planning system for tankers using an agile software development methodology.  Photo by Air Force Senior Airman Luke Milano

A combination of artificial intelligence, machine learning, cloud computing, fifth-generation communications and agile software development processes may one day allow commanders to direct any asset from anywhere, essentially revolutionizing command and control.

During the recent AFCEA Alamo Chapter Event in San Antonio, several officials agreed that the current command and control (C2) center known as an air operations center (AOC) has grown too cumbersome and vulnerable for Air Force commanders to make the rapid-fire decisions required in the modern era of multi-domain operations.

February 1, 2019
By Stephanie Chenault; Maj. Scott Kinner, USMC (Ret.); and Maj. Kurt Warner, USA (Ret.)
Artificial intelligence (AI) preparation of the battlefield requires rebooting the data discipline from source to sink.

The U.S. Defense Department lags the hype cycle for artificial intelligence, machine/deep learning and implementations like natural language processing by years. It needs to uncover the root causes contributing to this delay and create winning strategies to overcome institutional obstacles to get ahead of industrial partners and adversaries who are further along the adoption curve.

Possessing technology is neither deterministic nor decisive when waging war. The effective employment and deliberate application of technologies to enhance warfighting capabilities implies advantage over an adversary when suitably coupled with offensive and defensive tactics.

January 29, 2019
By George I. Seffers
Dan Coats, director of national intelligence, released today the intelligence community’s annual threat assessment, which lists cyber, artificial intelligence and weapons of mass destruction as some of the top technological threats. Credit: geralt/Pixabay

The United States faces a “toxic mix of threats,” Dan Coats, the director of National Intelligence, testified today before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence while unveiling the annual Worldwide Threat Assessment of the U.S. Intelligence Community.

January 9, 2019
Posted by George I. Seffers
IARPA has issued two requests for information, one for classified deep learning and machine learning research and another for novel cooling solutions for portable devices. Credit: geralt/Pixabay

The Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) is seeking information on research efforts in the area of machine learning with a particular focus on deep learning and in the area of cooling systems for small mobile devices.

January 1, 2019
By Nicola Whiting
The Automated Virtual Agent for Truth Assessments in Real Time, developed at San Diego State University, can detect changes in physiology and behavior during interviews with travelers. Photo by Aaron Elkins

Artificial intelligence can analyze vast amounts of information, identifying patterns and anomalies at a speed and scale beyond human capacity. To make it an invaluable part of defense, the goal will be to create cybersecurity systems that can anticipate national security threats. Once systems can automatically reconfigure themselves and their security controls to prevent any potential breaches, the next step will be to move to machines with the power to make their own decisions.

December 20, 2018
 

Dayton, Ohio-based Tangram Flex, Inc. has secured $4.5 million in venture capital funding from Hale Capital Partners. Tangram Flex provides artificial intelligence-based software development tools to that ensure cyber assurance and resilience for critical systems. “The software provides operational assurance and cyber-resilience for mission-critical embedded systems used in aircraft, missiles, and many other U.S. defense systems,” a company official stated. Tangram is a spin-off company of Portland-based Galois, Inc.

November 15, 2018
By Robert K. Ackerman
A Young AFCEAN-sponsored panel previewing the future of military data intelligence features (l-r) Brandon Lester, SRC Technologies; Mike Henry, The MITRE Corporation; Vincent Lee, Leeward Community College; Robert J. Runser; NSA Hawaii; and Chuck Weissenborn, Symantec. Credit: Bob Goodwin Photography

Artificial intelligence and machine learning are two of the many technologies that will change the way the military operates, according to a panel of experts. However, despite the revolutionary innovations that lie ahead, humans always will need to be the controlling factor in any operation.

These experts offered their views of the future on the second day of AFCEA’s TechNet Asia-Pacific 2018, held November 14-16 in Honolulu. In a panel sponsored by the Young AFCEANs, the five experts presented a younger generation’s perspective on the advantages and pitfalls of a data-centric battlespace.

October 22, 2018
By Mike Lloyd
Artificial intelligence is still too easily fooled to secure networks without human assistance. Credit: geralt/Pixabay

Artificial intelligence can be surprisingly fragile. This is especially true in cybersecurity, where AI is touted as the solution to our chronic staffing shortage.

It seems logical. Cybersecurity is awash in data, as our sensors pump facts into our data lakes at staggering rates, while wily adversaries have learned how to hide in plain sight. We have to filter the signal from all that noise. Security has the trifecta of too few people, too much data and a need to find things in that vast data lake. This sounds ideal for AI.

October 1, 2018
By George I. Seffers
DARPA officials envision a future battlefield made up of a collection of smaller systems in all warfighting domains communicating with one another and tailored to each mission.

The director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Steven Walker, pictures the future battlefield as a mosaic of lower-cost, less complex systems linked together in a vast number of ways to create desired, interwoven effects tailored to any scenario. The agency, known as DARPA, is standing up a new program office and investing in an array of technologies, from artificial intelligence to robotics to systems for hypersonic flight and space, to make that picture a reality.

October 1, 2018
By George I. Seffers
After getting a call from the White House, Dana Deasy came out of retirement to become the chief information officer for the U.S. Department of Defense.

By some measures, Dana Deasy, U.S. Defense Department chief information officer, has made a lot of progress in a little amount of time. He has developed an overarching digital modernization strategy, created a cyber working group, reviewed the department’s plans for implementing an enterprise-scale cloud computing architecture, and is leading an effort to establish a Joint Artificial Intelligence Center.

October 1, 2018
By Lt. Col. Federico Clemente, ESP A, and Cmdr. Stephen Gray, USN
Maj. Matthew Bailey, USA, executive officer, 3rd Squadron, 2d Cavalry Regiment (3/2CR), and 1st Lt. Trevor Rubel, USA, battle captain for the tactical command post, 3/2CR, review an operational overlay on a Nett Warrior device in preparation for an airfield seizure during the NATO Saber Strike 18 exercise in Kazlu Ruda, Lithuania. U.S. Army photo by 1st Lt. Joshua Snell

Technologies are spawning a revolutionary improvement in command and control that will have a transformative impact on how it is conducted at the operational level. These advancements, particularly artificial intelligence, are changing command and control functions such as sensing, processing, “sensemaking” and decision-making. Even greater changes lie ahead as innovation serves a larger role in defining both form and function.

September 11, 2018
By Ali Cybulski
DARPA research could lead to a third wave of AI technologies with humanlike communication and reasoning capabilities. Credit: DARPA

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the research arm of the U.S. Defense Department, will invest $2 billion in a multiyear campaign called “AI Next” to accelerate the next wave of artificial intelligence technologies. The agency, known as DARPA, plans to explore new theories and applications that could allow machines to adapt to changing situations.

August 22, 2018
By George I. Seffers
Lt. Gen. Bruce Crawford, USA, Army chief information officer, addresses the TechNet Augusta confrence. Photo by Michael Carpenter

The U.S. Army may establish an artificial intelligence task force over the next 90 days in an effort to help develop needed expertise and better prepare for the service for the future of warfare, says Lt. Gen. Bruce Crawford, USA, Army chief information officer. The service also is creating a cloud computing advisory board.

August 10, 2018
By George I. Seffers
Dana Deasy, who became the U.S. Defense Department’s chief information officer nearly 100 days ago, has been charged with creating the Joint Artificial Intelligence Center.

The U.S. Defense Department’s Joint Artificial Intelligence Center (JAIC) will see major progress next year, says Dana Deasy, the department’s new chief information officer. The joint center will accelerate the delivery of AI-enabled capabilities and develop tools and technologies that will offer benefits across the military.

August 1, 2018
By Jennifer A. Miller

Robotic process automation, or RPA, is a new type of business process technology leveraging artificial intelligence. Its uses span the realms of doctrine, organization, training, materiel, leadership and education, personnel, facilities and policy.

If you are not familiar with RPA, then think of the way that Microsoft Excel allows users to record steps when creating a macro. The concept is the same with RPA. Results include efficiencies in both public and private-sector organizations. The possibilities for RPA application are all around us.

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