asymmetric threats

April 29, 2019
By Robert K. Ackerman
Health care providers adjust personal protective equipment as they prepare to enter a facility treating the Ebola virus in Liberia. Future pandemics could come from natural viruses or biological weapons developed by sophisticated nations; but whichever the source, opportunistic foes will take advantage of their effects to wreak further havoc on victim nations. (U.S. Army photo)

(Part two of a three-part series)

As the world watches the COVID-19 coronavirus wreak havoc, the potential of a man-made pandemic is offering its own allure to bad actors, ranging from nation-states to rogue organizations. Even if an organization lacks the wherewithal to develop or deploy a biological weapon, lessons already learned are demonstrating that a pandemic offers great opportunities for mayhem and profit, a national security expert says.

April 29, 2020
 

Yorktown Systems Group Inc.,* Huntsville, Alabama, was awarded a $20,383,541 modification (P00038) to contract W911S0-17-C-0007 for operations support services including conducting and providing predictive modeling and trend analyses concerning global asymmetric threats. Work will be performed at Fort Meade, Maryland, with an estimated completion date of May 14, 2021. Fiscal 2020 operations and maintenance, Army funds in the amount of $20,383,541 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Field Directorate Office, Fort Eustis, Virginia, is the contracting activity. *Small Business

July 12, 2018
 

Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Maryland, has been awarded a $9,718,944 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract. The contract is to provide assessments and alternatives of offensive capabilities within the domains of air, land, sea, space and cyberspace, missions and warfare areas that asymmetrically mitigate threat effectiveness, impose cost, and/or create ambiguity in adversary decision-making. Work performance will take place in the national capital region, including Arlington, Virginia, and Alexandria, Virginia. Fiscal year 2017 research, development, test, and evaluation (RDT&E) funds in the amount of $1,262,414; fiscal 2018 RDT&E funds in the amount of $6,109,030; and fiscal 2018 operations and maintenanc

May 7, 2018
 

Edaptive Computing Inc.,* Dayton, Ohio, has been awarded a $24,900,000 ceiling indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity Small Business Innovation Research Phase III contract for solutions for threat assessment, mitigation and prevention research and development. This contract provides for the ability to research, develop, deploy and transition innovative optimization, assurance and automation technologies, techniques and tools to assess, mitigate and prevent threats to our systems and processes.  Work will be performed in Dayton, Ohio, and is expected to be complete by May 1, 2025. Fiscal year 2017 and 2018 research and development funds in the amount of $175,000 are being obligated at the time of award.

May 8, 2017
 

Yorktown Systems Group Inc.,* Huntsville, Alabama, was awarded a $22,469,405 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for operations support services, including conducting and providing predictive modeling and trend analyses concerning global asymmetric threats. Bids were solicited via the Internet with seven received. Work will be performed in Fort Meade, Maryland, with an estimated completion date of May 14, 2021. No funding will be obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Fort Eustis, Virginia, is the contracting activity (W911S0-17-C-0007).

*Small Business

 

September 21, 2015
 

BAE Systems Technology Solutions & Services Inc., Rockville, Maryland (W911NF-15-D-0001); Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, Ohio (W911NF-15-D-0002); Booz Allen Hamilton Inc., McLean, Virginia (W911NF-15-D-0003); Bowhead System Management LLC,* Alexandria, Virginia (W

September 28, 2010
By Beverly Schaeffer

The United Kingdom is giving its defense structure a good hard look, with plans to revamp its architecture, mission and capabilities. Recognizing the need to move away from a mentality built on Cold War threats, U.K. leaders have commissioned several studies to determine the way ahead. In this issue of SIGNAL Magazine, Robert K. Ackerman gleans insight on the goals of the U.K.