beyond line of sight

June 1, 2018
By Kurt Stephens and Bill Whittington
An omnidirectional broadband antenna and 5 meter Rolatube mast system weighs 11 pounds and can be set up and ready for transmit and receive in less than six minutes by one person.

With the development and fielding of satellite communications throughout the U.S. military, today’s warfighters rarely use high frequency communications within and between units. International events have increased interest in high frequency communications as an alternative to connecting via satellites on current and future battlefields. U.S. military units already own a large amount of the radio equipment suitable for employment at various levels of the battlefield and for humanitarian relief as a redundant means of beyond-line-of-sight communications.

August 24, 2012
By George Seffers

Northrop Grumman Space and Missile Systems Corporation, San Diego, California, is being awarded a $20,170,782 contract modification to integrate beyond line of sight capability (BLOS) onto an E-11A aircraft. The contracting activity is Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts.

July 2, 2012
By George Seffers

L-3 Communications Systems, Salt Lake City, Utah, is being awarded a $10,005,050 a firm-fixed-price contract to procure beyond-line-of-sight command and control for long lead common data link items parts and labor. Air Force Materiel Command, Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts, is the contracting activity.

April 18, 2012
By George Seffers

L-3 Communications, Salt Lake City, Utah, was awarded an $85 million firm-fixed-price cost-plus-fixed-fee indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for the services in support of the beyond line of sight command and control quick reaction capability. The U.S. Army Contracting Command, Fort Eustis, Virginia, is the contracting activity.

August 5, 2011
By Beverly Schaeffer

With this issue of SIGNAL Magazine focusing on Army technologies, George I. Seffers takes us right to the heart of the action in Afghanistan in his recent coverage as an embedded journalist. As SIGNAL's technology editor, Seffers had the opportunity to get up close and personal with the needs of warfighters in that mountainous, unforgiving terrain. Dismounted soldiers have to be the boots on the ground and go where no vehicle has possible ventured before.

October 8, 2010
By George Seffers

The Boeing Company, Wichita, Kansas, was awarded a $12 million contract modification for a future beyond line of sight (BLOS) communication capability with the advanced extremely high frequency family of advanced BLOS terminals on the B-52. Aeronautical Systems Center, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, is the contracting activity.