chemical agent detectors

June 29, 2018
 
Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin have created a nerve gas detector using a smartphone, a box made of Legos and a chemical sensor. Credit: University of Texas at Austin

Researchers at the University of Texas, Austin, have designed a way to sense dangerous chemicals by rigging up a smartphone, a sensor and a box made from Lego bricks, the university has announced. The device could help first responders and scientists in the field identify deadly and difficult-to-detect nerve agents such as VX and sarin.

October 9, 2014
By Sandra Jontz

The Defense Department's premier research agency put a call out for technology that can detect and identify from great distances dangerous biological and chemical substances. 

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) issued a broad agency announcement for the development of the small devices for the new Spectral Combs from UV to THz (SCOUT) program, according to the agency.

April 10, 2012
By George Seffers

Smiths Detection, Edgewood, Maryland, was awarded a $27,488,727 firm-fixed-price contract modification to procure joint chemical agent detectors, communication adapter kits, and sieve packs. The U.S. Army Contracting Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, is the contracting activity.

August 31, 2011
By George Seffers

Smiths Detection, Edgewood, Maryland, was awarded an $8,559,840 firm-fixed-price contract modification to procure 1,440 joint chemical agent detectors and 1,400 communication adapter kits. The U.S. Army Contracting Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, is the contracting activity.