cyber

October 15, 2018
By Paul Parker
Technical, physical, and departmental silos could undermine the government’s Internet of Things security efforts. Credit: methodshop/Pixabay

Every time federal information technology professionals think they’ve gotten in front of the cybersecurity risks posed by the Internet of Things (IoT), a new and unexpected challenge rears its head. Take, for instance, the heat maps used by GPS-enabled fitness tracking applications, which the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) warned showed the location of military bases, or the infamous Mirai Botnet attack of 2016.

October 9, 2018
By George I. Seffers
With stealth technology, advanced sensors, weapons capacity and range, the F-35 can collect, analyze and share data. A U.S. Government Accountability Office report—which did not specify any particular weapon system—says a number of cybersecurity tests prove U.S. military weapon systems to be vulnerable to cyber attacks. Photo: Lockheed Martin

U.S. military aircraft, ships, combat vehicles, radios and satellites remain vulnerable to relatively common cyber attacks, according to a report published Tuesday by the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO). The report does not specify which weapon systems were tested.

In one case, a two-person test team took just one hour to gain initial access to a weapon system and one day to gain full control of the system, the report says. Another assessment demonstrated that the weapon system “satisfactorily prevented unauthorized access by remote users, but not insiders and near-siders.”

October 2, 2018
 

COLSA Corp., Huntsville, Alabama, has been awarded a $69,618,375 modification (P00039) to contract FA2486-16-F-0031 for Technical and Management Advisory Services Command, control, communications, computer, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (C4ISR)/cyber support.  The contractor will provide additional research, development, test and evaluation, and acquisition support services.  Work will be performed at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida; Hanscom AFB, Massachusetts; Gunter Annex, Alabama; Patrick AFB, Florida; Edwards AFB, California; Scott AFB, Illinois; Robins AFB, Georgia; Beale AFB, California; Hill AFB, Utah; Langley AFB, Virginia; and San Antonio, Texas, and is expected to be completed by September 30, 2019.  This modifica

October 1, 2018
By George I. Seffers
Soldiers from the 25th Infantry Division in Hawaii and from U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Centers of Excellence participate in the Army's Cyber Blitz in April 2016 at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, New Jersey. Cyber Blitz provides the Army a way to learn about cyber and electromagnetic activity. U.S. Army CERDEC photo by Kristen Kushiyama

The U.S. Army’s Cyber Blitz experimental exercise September 17-28 turned out to be an eye-opener for one maneuver officer regarding cyber’s capabilities on the battlefield.

Military leaders often describe the “speed of cyber” as being measured in milliseconds or microseconds, which means the operations tempo in the cyber realm is incredibly high and decisions are made rapidly. But an offensive cyber campaign can sometimes take much longer than maneuver commanders might expect. In a teleconference with reporters to discuss Cyber Blitz results, Lt. Col. John Newman, USA, deputy commanding officer, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, reports that the experiment proved to be a revelation.

October 1, 2018
By George I. Seffers
After getting a call from the White House, Dana Deasy came out of retirement to become the chief information officer for the U.S. Department of Defense.

By some measures, Dana Deasy, U.S. Defense Department chief information officer, has made a lot of progress in a little amount of time. He has developed an overarching digital modernization strategy, created a cyber working group, reviewed the department’s plans for implementing an enterprise-scale cloud computing architecture, and is leading an effort to establish a Joint Artificial Intelligence Center.

October 1, 2018
By Dustan Hellwig
Staff Sgt. Kristoffer Perez, USA, Cyber Electromagnetic Activities section, 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, carries a dismounted electronic warfare kit that allows him to work in concert with the rest of his section. To get inside an enemy’s OODA loop, commanders will need a way to see how electronic warfare is affecting the battlespace. Photo by Sgt. Michael C. Roach, 19th Public Affairs Detachment

Work is needed to improve temporal, spectral and information understanding within the layers of the cyber domain to facilitate useful cyber-spectral and information maneuver. These advances could be incorporated into tactics, techniques and procedures as well as tactical and operational systems to enhance the overall military commanders’ decision process to achieve information dominance.

Most of the tactical cyberspace domain is spectrum-dependent and administered solely at the physical layer. Currently, warfighters cannot comprehend, much less maneuver within, a space that is inaccessible to them because they are not in a dimensionality to understand it. They operate in a cyber-spectral flatland.

October 1, 2018
By Lt. Col. Federico Clemente, ESP A, and Cmdr. Stephen Gray, USN
Maj. Matthew Bailey, USA, executive officer, 3rd Squadron, 2d Cavalry Regiment (3/2CR), and 1st Lt. Trevor Rubel, USA, battle captain for the tactical command post, 3/2CR, review an operational overlay on a Nett Warrior device in preparation for an airfield seizure during the NATO Saber Strike 18 exercise in Kazlu Ruda, Lithuania. U.S. Army photo by 1st Lt. Joshua Snell

Technologies are spawning a revolutionary improvement in command and control that will have a transformative impact on how it is conducted at the operational level. These advancements, particularly artificial intelligence, are changing command and control functions such as sensing, processing, “sensemaking” and decision-making. Even greater changes lie ahead as innovation serves a larger role in defining both form and function.

October 1, 2018
By Chief Warrant Officer 2 Juan Muralles, USA; Chief Warrant Officer 2 Wavell Williams Jr., USA; Maj. Nicolas Beck, USA; and Maj. Daniel Canchola, USA
The worldwide regional hub nodes, including in the Pacific, are the largest satellite transport nodes of the Army’s tactical communications network, Warfighter Information Network-Tactical (WIN-T), enabling robust network communication exchange in, out and within theater. U.S. Army photo by Liana Mayo, PAO 311th Signal Command

Future U.S. Army regionally aligned forces will benefit from experiences—and solutions—discovered during last year’s integration with the U.S. Army Europe communications network. Although their communicators expected to hit the ground running when they arrived in theater, integrating tactical communications systems was more difficult than expected. Fortunately, new technology and soldiers’ know-how not only solved the immediate problems but also set the stage for easier communications integration in the future.

October 1, 2018
By Robert K. Ackerman
The USS Carney transits the Mediterranean Sea on patrol. The diverse nature of U.S. Navy ship systems presents a service-unique challenge to cybersecurity efforts as the Navy modernizes its information technologies. Credit: U.S. Navy photography by Mass Communications Spec. 1st Class Ryan U. Kledzik, USN

Multifaceted efforts that will work in concert with each other are at the heart of U.S. Navy cybersecurity programs. The sea service faces the dual challenge of incorporating new architectures and technologies such as the cloud, light-based communications, artificial intelligence and machine learning amid increasingly sophisticated adversaries. It is implementing new approaches that promise operational efficiency and better cybersecurity, but these approaches are complementary and must function together to realize their full potential.

September 27, 2018
Posted by Kimberly Underwood
President Donald Trump departs from the South Lawn of the White House on September 6.  With the issuance of the new National Cyber Strategy, the president promises his administration "will act to further enable the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to secure federal department and agency networks.” Credit: Shealah Craighead

With the United States engaged in a “long-term strategic competition” with China and Russia, which are mounting persistent cyber attack campaigns that pose long-term risks to America, the U.S. military will act to deter aggression, cyber or otherwise, according to a new policy, known as the Department of Defense Cyber Strategy, from the U.S. Department of Defense.

September 24, 2018
Posted by Kimberly Underwood
A recent report from the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) finds federal government actions related to cybersecurity lagging, posing a threat to the nation’s critical infrastructure and federal agencies. Photo credit: Shutterstock/Mark Van Scyoc

The U.S. government has not established a comprehensive cybersecurity strategy, nor has it performed effective oversight of cybersecurity as called for by federal law and policy, the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) concluded in a stark report on the state of the nation’s cybersecurity.

Because of the cybersecurity policy lag and related action, federal agencies and U.S. critical infrastructure—including energy, transportation systems, communications and financial services—are vulnerable. And these cybersecurity risks are increasing as security threats evolve and become more sophisticated, GAO, the government’s watchdog agency, reported.

September 4, 2018
By Robert K. Ackerman
John Hamre (l), president of the Center for Strategic and International Studies, speaks with John Rood, undersecretary of defense for policy, during a panel discussion moderated by Hamre at the 2018 Intelligence and National Security Summit. Photography by Herman Farrer.

Across-the-board innovation is increasing the national security threat picture, and the U.S. Defense Department is preparing to respond in kind. Technology advances such as hypersonics and artificial intelligence may join macroprojects such as a new space force as peer and near-peer adversaries gear up to overcome U.S. military superiority.

September 4, 2018
By Robert K. Ackerman
Dan Coats, director of national intelligence, describes the challenges facing the community at the Intelligence and National Security Summit. Photography by Herman Farrer

Economics, crime, terrorism and technology form the basis of four major challenges confronting the U.S. intelligence community, according to its director. Dan Coats, director of national intelligence, described the causes of these challenges to a large luncheon audience on the first day of the 2018 Intelligence and National Security Summit sponsored by AFCEA International and INSA at National Harbor, Maryland.

September 1, 2018
By Kimberly Underwood
 The federal government is building upon tried-and-true identification forms to create new ID frameworks for the digital age. Credit: Kisan/Shutterstock

The federal government, building on existing identity management practices, is investigating how it can leverage passports and other state and federally issued ID cards to verify identity in the digital age. The need to validate a citizen’s identity in person and online is only going to grow across platforms, experts say. And absent a secure commercial solution, the government may have to provide verification of identity.

September 1, 2018
By George I. Seffers
Artificial intelligence-driven voice forensics can yield a great deal of information about a speaker, including physical characteristics, health, genealogy and environment. Credit: Shutterstock

In the future, voice analysis of an intercepted phone call from an international terrorist to a crony could yield the caller’s age, gender, ethnicity, height, weight, health status, emotional state, educational level and socioeconomic class. Artificial intelligence-fueled voice forensics technology also may offer clues about location; room size; wall, ceiling and floor type; amount of clutter; kind of device, down to the specific model used to make the call; and possibly even facial characteristics of the caller.  

September 1, 2018
By Robert K. Ackerman
Army Research Laboratory (ARL) exploration into artificial intelligence (AI) may lead to soldiers networked directly with unmanned vehicles in human-intelligent agent teaming on the battlefield, as shown in this artist’s concept. Credit: U.S. Army illustration

Artificial intelligence, or AI, will become an integral warfighter for the U.S. Army if the service’s research arm has its way. Scientists at the Army Research Laboratory are pursuing several major goals in AI that, taken together, could revolutionize the composition of a warfighting force in the future.

The result of their diverse efforts may be a battlefield densely populated by intelligent devices cooperating with their human counterparts. This AI could be self-directing sensors, intelligent munitions, smart exoskeletons and physical machines, such as autonomous robots, or virtual agents controlling networks and waging defensive and offensive cyber war.

September 1, 2018
By Timur Chabuk and Adam Jonas
Credit: Azret Ayubov/Martial Red/Le_Mon/Shutterstock

Russia’s ability to evolve its use of information operations to leverage social media and the cyber domain continues to shock and challenge the world community. The country’s actions, especially during the 2016 U.S. elections, have brought cyber information operations out of the shadows and into the limelight. Now, state and nonstate actors are frequently using similar techniques to influence the public and achieve political goals once only attainable through armed conflict.

September 1, 2018
By Lt. Col. Christopher Treff, USAF
Select personnel from 15 Air National Guard Engineering and Installation organizations are installing more than 600 miles of cabling in support of the U.S. Strategic Command (STRATCOM), Command and Control facility (C2F) construction project. U.S. Air Force photo by Steve Cunningham

U.S. Strategic Command headquarters, the lynchpin for U.S. nuclear deterrence, is undergoing the technical renovations it requires to fulfill its current mission and facilitate growth for future operations. The new command and control facility under construction integrates the latest technologies and meets the growing demand to continue to evolve as needs emerge.

August 30, 2018
Posted by Kimberly Underwood
Michael Moss, deputy director of the Cyber Threat Intelligence Integration Center (CTIIC), Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), told Congress that CTIIC remains concerned by the "increasingly damaging effects of cyber operations and the apparent acceptance by adversaries of collateral damage." Credit: Shutterstock/EVorona

As billions more Internet of Things (IoT)-related devices come online, the barrage of cyber threats will not only continue but will target users in new ways. Moreover, the number of adversaries mounting attacks against the United States in cyberspace will continue to grow in the next year, as nation-states, terrorist groups, criminal organizations and others persist in the development of cyber warfare capabilities, Michael Moss, deputy director, Cyber Threat Intelligence Integration Center (CTIIC) warned during recent Congressional testimony.

August 29, 2018
By Paul Parker
Agencies should consider taking five fundamental steps to fortify networks before the next cyber attack. Credit: Daria-Yakovleva/Pixabay

Government IT professionals have clear concerns about the threats posed by careless and untrained insiders, foreign governments, criminal hackers and others. For the government, cyber attacks are a matter of life. We must deal with them as a common occurrence.

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