December 2003

December 2003
By James C. Bussert

 

Ming-class submarine 361, shown here in Shanghai in 1995, was towed to port in April 2003 after the entire crew of 70 was killed in an accident during fleet exercises. China's ambitious effort to develop an effective submarine fleet has been hampered by a range of difficulties. 

December 2003
By Robert K. Ackerman

 

DigitalGlobe's QuickBird satellite provides commercial remote sensing panchromatic imagery with a resolution of 0.61 meters. The next generation of commercial remote sensing satellites, which is the target of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency's NextView program, will have a panchromatic resolution at least as sharp as 0.5 meters. 

December 2003
By Robert K. Ackerman

 

The U.S. Navy's free electron laser soon may be providing fleet air defense for surface vessels. Recent experiments have drawn scientists closer to power levels that will make the multifaceted defensive system a reality. 

Researchers have seen the light for protecting surface ships against multiple threats.

December 2003
By Maryann Lawlor

 

As part of the Navy/Marine Corps Intranet (NMCI), the U.S. Navy has stood up network operation centers (NOCs) in Oahu, Hawaii, and Norfolk, Virginia, similar to this one in San Diego. Another NOC is being set up at the U.S. Marine Corps base in Quantico, Virginia. 

U.S. Navy incorporates adjustments while continuing on a steady course.

By Maryann Lawlor

 

Members of the Very Shallow Waters Mine Counter Measures Command unhook a battlespace preparation autonomous underwater vehicle in the waters off the California coast. The role of autonomous vehicles in operations is one of the forks in the road for the U.S. Navy. 

Choices about weapons, platforms and homeland defense role could have far-reaching effects.

December 2003
By Maryann Lawlor

 

During this fiscal year, the Rapid Technology Transition Program, managed by the U.S. Navy's Commercial Technology Transition Office (CTTO), is set to identify high-risk/high-payoff technologies such as titanium nitride coating for helicopter turbine engine blades used in harsh environments. 

Creative deal-making techniques help military and industry.

December 2003
By Maryann Lawlor

 

To introduce its Centrino mobile technology products, Intel Corporation's mobile messengers march through Times Square in New York. It was the company's biggest product launch since the Pentium processor 10 years ago.

Mobile technologies come home.

December 2003
By Robert K. Ackerman

A road map aims to increase civil use of the embryonic market.

A new policy that directs government organizations to expand the use of U.S. commercial remote sensing technology is opening the eyes of government and industry to potential partnerships. Government entities that had not used remote sensing before are discovering applications that may become integral to their way of doing business in a few years. Concurrently, commercial satellite imagery providers are finding unexplored market possibilities. This growing synergy ultimately may lead to civil government input on the design and development of future remote sensing platforms.

December 2003
By Vice Adm. Herbert A. Browne, USN (Ret.)

A great deal has been written about how information technologies represent a new industrial revolution, and many of the changes of that revolution have reached into virtually every corner of our lives. Yet, that two-decade-old transformation is now being changed by a revolution emerging from within: the advent of ubiquitous wireless connectivity.

Individuals in the industrialized West are living this change firsthand as they equip themselves with cellular telephones, BlackBerrys and other personal digital assistants (PDAs). But, the importance of this revolution best can be seen where it has the greatest impact—in the military.

December 2003
By Henry S. Kenyon

New rule promotes automated frequency-shifting methods to prevent spectrum clashes with commercial, government users.

A recently adopted international standard protects military radar and scientific satellite transmissions against potential interference from wireless local area networks. It provides a toolkit and guidelines for manufacturers to modify their products to switch automatically to alternate channels when these signals are detected.

December 2003
By Henry S. Kenyon

December 2003
By Henry S. Kenyon

 

The U.S. Navy's Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) is scheduled to enter service in 2009. MUOS consists of a space segment, groundstations and mobile user terminals. The satellites will provide unprotected, narrowband ultrahigh frequency communications capable of reaching handheld devices under adverse signal and weather conditions.