Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium 2016

June 1, 2016
By Robert K. Ackerman

The rapidly changing nature of cyberspace is driving government and industry further into each other’s arms, but even that newfound relationship may not be sufficient to ensure U.S. force supremacy and protect the nation’s critical infrastructure from attack. Both sides must retool their approaches to doing business with each other if the military is to achieve its aims.

April 22, 2016
By Robert K. Ackerman

The days of the United States as an unassailable hyperpower have been replaced by an intensely competitive environment where two large rivals have rebuilt their militaries based on perceived U.S. vulnerabilities. Cyberspace is a foremost operational domain for each nation, and the United States must respond to their challenge or risk coming out second in a conflict with either nation.

April 22, 2016
By Robert K. Ackerman

The Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) is treading a fine line as it tries to expand its relationship with industry without running afoul of federal acquisition regulations (FARs). The agency wants to bring industry into its processes earlier, but it cannot risk being accused of prejudicing future competition.

Several leading DISA officials made these points at a special media roundtable held during, but apart from, the 2016 Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium (DCOS), held in the Washington, D.C., convention center April 20-22.

April 22, 2016
By Robert K. Ackerman

Time is of the essence in detecting and protecting against cyber intruders, but some security measures actually work counter to their goal by increasing the difficulty for managers to fight intruders. In their haste to provide the best network security possible, these managers have hindered their ability to rid their system of many types of malware.

April 22, 2016
By Robert K. Ackerman

Efforts to counter adversaries in cyberspace jointly continue apace in the U.S. military, but the changing nature of enemy activities may require new approaches by the services. Baseline cyber activities may need to be increased, while some actions will need to remain the purview of individual services.

A panel of cyber officials discussed the ramifications of such changes on the final day of the AFCEA Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium (DCOS) 2016, held April 20-22 at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C.

April 21, 2016
By Robert K. Ackerman

The secret to success as a technology firm may be to reduce its size, said the CEO of one of the biggest information system companies. Meg Whitman, president and CEO of Hewlett Packard Enterprise, outlined that philosophy to the Thursday luncheon audience at Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium (DCOS) 2016, being held in the Washington, D.C., convention center, April 20-22.

Whitman split her company into two parts: one manufacturing computer and printer hardware, the other focusing on information system services. She ascribed that action to the needs of an increasingly fast-changing high-technology sector.

April 21, 2016
By Robert K. Ackerman

Existing government procurement processes virtually guarantee failure in efforts to incorporate innovative technologies. The long timeline essentially ensures the technology will be obsolete well before it is delivered.

These were some of many points driven home by Meg Whitman, president and CEO of Hewlett Packard Enterprise. She spoke at the Thursday keynote luncheon at Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium (DCOS) 2016, being held in the Washington, D.C., convention center, April 20-22, where she was interviewed one-on-one by Terry Halvorsen, Defense Department chief information officer.

April 21, 2016
By Robert K. Ackerman

Working with allies on cybersecurity could provide wide-ranging solutions that both address challenges and generate operational opportunities, suggested the U.S. Defense Department’s chief information officer. Speaking at Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium (DCOS) 2016, being held in the Washington, D.C., convention center, April 20-22, Terry Halvorsen told the morning plenary session audience that European allies are pursuing excellent approaches as they strive for cybersecurity. The United States and its allies would benefit highly from cooperating, he said.

April 21, 2016
By Robert K. Ackerman

The technology to solve many defense and national security challenges may be at hand, but it never will achieve its full effects without major changes in the way industry and government interact. Old practices must be swept away both in policy and in attitude for the Defense Department be able to fully exploit the strengths of private sector innovation.

April 20, 2016
By Robert K. Ackerman

Industry will hold the key to U.S. military information technology systems, according to the director of the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA). Lt. Gen. Alan R. Lynn, USA, explained industry’s role to the keynote luncheon audience at Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium (DCOS) 2016, being held in Washington, D.C., April 20-22.

“We want the technology industry to partner with us to develop the next generation of military [information technology] services,” Gen. Lynn said. “We’re seeking more opportunities to provide CRADAs [cooperative research and development agreements] with industry.”

April 20, 2016
By Robert K. Ackerman

Cybermarauders have become so malevolent that today’s environment is nothing less than “cyberwarfare,” according to the director of the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA). Lt. Gen. Alan R. Lynn, USA, told the keynote luncheon audience at Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium (DCOS) 2016, being held in Washington, D.C., April 20-22, that cyber has changed considerably over the past few years.

April 20, 2016
By Robert K. Ackerman

The Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) is undergoing a reorganization, effective May 1, that aims to refocus efforts more efficiently for government and contractors alike. Traditional portfolios have been rearranged to reflect new emphases and service patterns.

Tony Montemarano, executive deputy director, DISA, outlined those changes during the opening session of the Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium (DCOS) 2016, being held in the Washington, D.C., Convention Center, April 20-22. Montemarano was blunt about the challenges facing DISA in this new era.