education

May 16, 2019
By George I. Seffers
Panelists at TechNet Cyber discuss the cyber workforce and the need for continuous education. Phoot by Michael Carpenter

Personnel working in cyber must continually look for opportunities to learn, say cyber professionals from across government.

During a morning panel discussion on the final day of the AFCEA TechNet Cyber conference in Baltimore, high-ranking officials from the Defense Department, Department of Homeland Security and National Security Agency discussed a wide range of issues concerning the cyber workforce today and tomorrow.

May 1, 2019
By Janel Nelson
To attract more cybersecurity professionals into the teaching profession, school systems must change their qualifications requirements and revise recertification timelines. Credit: Photographee.eu/Shutterstock

Recruiting and maintaining a cybersecurity workforce is a complicated challenge for the government. According to the Information System Security Certification Consortium, 85 percent of cybersecurity professionals would consider leaving their current jobs. Information technologists do not need to search for positions that are exciting, respect their expertise, help them become more marketable and pay well because as many as 18 percent of non-active job seekers are contacted daily by employers seeking them out.

January 16, 2019
By Julianne Simpson
Rob Joyce, senior cyber advisor to the director, NSA, talks about the cyber workforce shortage at CERTS.

There is not enough skilled talent for the growing need of the cyber community. Based on a state-by-state analysis on cyberchair.org, there are currently 320,000 open cyber jobs in the United States. Projections get worse. According to a CISCO report, by 2020 there will be 1 million unfilled cyber positions worldwide.

“We need to make systemic changes to address that gap,” said Rob Joyce, senior cybersecurity strategy advisor to the director, National Security Agency (NSA), and former cybersecurity advisor to the president.

August 23, 2018
By George I. Seffers
Maj. Gen. John Morrison Jr., USA, commanding general of the Army Cyber Center of Excellence, moderates a panel at the AFCEA TechNet Augusta conference. Photo by Michael Carpenter

The U.S. Army is making multiple changes to the way it educates soldiers fighting in the cyber and electronic warfare domains. Rather than training soldiers on step-by-step processes, the service is educating personnel to come up with their own solutions on a technologically complex battlefield.

September 19, 2017
By Maryann Lawlor
Continuous cybersecurity training enables organizations to better use the expertise within their staffs. (Photo by Shutterstock)

A survey of thousands of information technology professionals reveals that a majority of organizations have too few security workers and nearly half do not provide adequate resources for security training. According to the “IT Professionals Are a Critically Underutilized Resource for Cybersecurity” study, 51 percent of the respondents said their systems are less able to defend against a cyber attack compared to a year ago.

September 5, 2017
By 1st Lt. Maxim Yershov, USA
The military offers enlisted and officer personnel many educational opportunities to further their careers. One such option is preparing for and taking the Information Technology Infrastructure Library, or ITIL, exam. Staff Sgt. Timothy Watkins, USA, 52D Signal Battalion, Stuttgart, Germany, is pictured.

The military services offer warfighters extensive opportunities for professional development. Unfortunately, many fail to explore all available options. They lose the advantage of professional growth, and the country misses out on innovative thinkers who could help meet ongoing and future challenges.

The strategic focus for the realignment of military force has changed since the months immediately following the tragic events of September 11, 2001. The complexity of asymmetric warfare and engagement in proxy wars has forced the U.S. Defense Department to ensure that only the most qualified members remain in the military.

August 8, 2017
 
Northeastern University is developing a system that will help you plug leaks of your private information.

Northeastern University will develop a system that organizations and individuals can use to audit and control personally identifiable information leaks from connected devices. The research team will investigate how to use machine learning to reliably identify the information in network flows and will develop algorithms that incorporate user feedback to adapt to the constantly changing landscape of privacy leaks.

July 20, 2017
By Maryann Lawlor
Maj. Gen. Sandra Finan, USAF, discusses her unique path, barriers she helped break and future opportunities that exist for women in the Air Force.

I was walking our two dogs listening to a “Stuff Mom Never Told You” podcast when the women in STEM idea piqued my interest. The topic intrigued me mostly because I thought in 2016 the issue of gender in the workplace had been settled. In a way, I was right. Career options for women were no longer limited to teaching, nursing or the nunnery.

June 7, 2017
By Breann Pendleton
Attending conference sessions like this one from the 2016 DCOS can help you earn certifications. Photo by Michael Carpenter

CompTIA has sweetened the pot for participants of an inaugural five-hour mini-boot camp offered next week at the AFCEA Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium (DCOS) in Baltimore.

Participants of the entire mini-boot camp, which showcases CompTIA’s newest security certification, the CompTIA Cybersecurity Analyst (CSA+), will receive a free 30-day CSA+ Practice Lab evaluation license.

April 1, 2017
 
Educational sessions like this one from last year’s TechNet Augusta Conference provide continuing education credits.

AFCEA International’s Continuing Education (CE) program has grown dramatically since its start in 2012. The program primarily supports maintenance of CompTIA and Global Information Assurance Certification (GIAC) related to Department of Defense Directive 8570.01-M compliance but also fulfills some continuing education and cybersecurity certification maintenance requirements for the (ISC)2, the National Contract Management Association (NCMA), the Project Management Institute (PMI), the Generally Accepted Government Auditing Standards (GAGAS) and the Defense Acquisition Workforce. In addition, AFCEA Leadership Forums have been approved for George Mason University continuing education units (CEUs). 

February 7, 2017
By Sandra Jontz

Today marks the 14th annual Safer Internet Day, a global campaign to make the cyber domain a littler safer, especially for children. This year’s theme, Be the change: Unite for a better Internet,” highlights how all of society has a role to play in cybersecurity, and that working together creates a safer Internet, according to a campaign statement.

October 6, 2016
By Sandra Jontz
Students check in for the one-day West Point Leadership and Ethics Conference 2016, held in March at George Mason University's Arlington, Virginia, campus.

High school students should begin now to voice interest to participate in an annual ethics and leadership program that seeks to equip students with skills to process and handle difficult life situations.

Each year, the West Point Leadership and Ethics Conference (WPLEC) draws roughly 200 juniors in the Washington, D.C., area for a day of learning, camaraderie, solving ethical dilemmas and even having some fun, program founders say. Faculty members from 46 area high schools also attend, with some earning continuing education credit for participation.

August 10, 2016
By Sandra Jontz
Nischit Vaidya (c), stands with his mother Mira Vaidya and father Niranjan Vaidya. Vaidya started a scholarship in his parents' names for cyber students at Capitol Technology University. Two students, a male and a female, will receive $1,000 each this fall. Photo courtesy Nischit Vaidya.

When students studying cybersecurity return to Capitol Technology University in Maryland this fall, cash scholarships donated by a former adjunct professor will aid at least two of them.

Nischit Vaidya, president and CEO of Argotis, is driven by a love of education and a desire to give back to his community. The new scholarship program—created in his parents' names—accomplishes that quest and provides a legacy honoring his parents, who endured years of hard work and worry to see their son succeed, he says. “For me, the biggest thing is my mom and dad.”

July 1, 2016
 

Continue your education through one of AFCEA’s preferred providers. Earn advanced degrees and certifications at your own pace, according to your schedule, through a flexible online or classroom environment—and at a discounted rate as a member of AFCEA.

October 1, 2015
 
Keynote speaker Lt. Gen. Susan Lawrence, USA (Ret.), delivers a presentation at the Leadership Forum held in June at the Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium in Baltimore.

The AFCEA Leadership Forum is a professional development program for government, military and industry midlevel managers in the defense, intelligence and homeland security communities. Attendees actively participate in six sessions, or 12 instructional hours, that combine lecture and classroom instruction with presentations from senior leaders representing military, government, industry and academia. Formal and informal networking opportunities complement the program.

April 1, 2015
By Sandra Jontz
U.S. Army engineers expose high school students to science-related career paths through advanced classroom instruction and hands-on experiments as part of the Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Science program, which highlights power, energy and cyber curriculums.

Cybersecurity is not one of the attractive career fields that tend to draw job seekers in droves to job fairs, especially among today’s young people now entering the work force, experts say. It has been a fairly ill-defined occupation, and that has led to the creation of a U.S. government office to work to codify requirements and job descriptions. It also has prompted a discourse about whether to professionalize the line of work as the United States struggles with a critical shortage of experts qualified to keep safe the networks that handle the cornucopia of personal, government and business information in the booming digital world.

March 1, 2015
 

If you’re like most consumers, shopping on the Internet has become a common occurrence. In 2014, more than 1.12 billion people worldwide shopped online; in the U.S. alone, 196.6 million shoppers took to the Web, according to online statistics portal Statista. Internet shopping is expected to continue its exponential rise during the next five years. As Dr. Vince Patton, executive director for the AFCEA Educational Foundation, puts it, “Online shopping is no longer the wave of the future. It’s here now and has become a new normal.”

August 7, 2012
By Rachel Eisenhower

With this free education app, knowledge is literally at your fingertips. The Khan Academy iPad app features more than 3,200 videos from the nonprofit organization's extensive library. The Khan Academy aims to provide free world-class education for anyone, anywhere, and this app does just that. The materials and resources available for viewing and download cover topics ranging from math to biology, chemistry, finance, history and the humanities, among others. Use the app to create entire playlists to watch offline at your own pace; follow along with subtitles; track your progress; and view your achievements.

June 5, 2012
By Rachel Eisenhower

Think you're a history buff? Put yourself to the test with the DocsTeach app for iPad that presents challenges based on documents from the U.S. National Archives. The mobile teaching tool generates activities based on primary source documents such as the U.S. Constitution, a canceled check for the purchase of Alaska and Thomas Edison's patent drawing for the light bulb. Simply pick a historical era or topic and take on the challenge. In addition, teachers can create a free account at DocsTeach.org. This enables them to share a classroom code with students who can take on assigned activities on iPad devices.

May 1, 2012
By Rachel Eisenhower

A new social language app for the iPhone takes learning out of the classroom. The free PlaySay app connects English and Spanish speaking players in a game setting where the goal is to practice real phrases and improve pronunciation. To play, simple take on a series of missions within the app that revolve around real-life scenarios such as introducing yourself or ordering food. PlaySay uses speech-recognition technology to evaluate your pronunciation and provide feedback. The app then tracks the phrases and keeps score of which items you've mastered. See PlaySay in action in this video.

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