electronic warfare

September 18, 2018
 

Northrup Grumman Systems Corp., Linthicum Heights, Maryland, is awarded a $9,000,000 cost-only modification to previously awarded contract N00024-15-C-5319 for long lead material for Surface Electronic Warfare Improvement Program (SEWIP) Block 3 low-rate initial production. The SEWIP is an evolutionary acquisition and incremental development program to upgrade the existing AN/SLQ-32(V) electronic warfare system. SEWIP Block 3 will provide select Navy surface ships a scalable electronic warfare enterprise suite with improved electronic attack capabilities. Work will be performed in Linthicum, Maryland (98 percent); and Los Angeles, California (2 percent), and is expected to be completed by November 2020.

August 28, 2018
 

SRC Inc., North Syracuse, New York, was awarded a $33,280,064 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for Electronic Warfare Integrated Reprogramming, analysis, production and process support services. One bid was solicited with one bid received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of August 26, 2023. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Warren, Michigan, is the contracting activity (W911W5-18-D-0002).

August 23, 2018
By George I. Seffers
Maj. Gen. John Morrison Jr., USA, commanding general of the Army Cyber Center of Excellence, moderates a panel at the AFCEA TechNet Augusta conference. Photo by Michael Carpenter

The U.S. Army is making multiple changes to the way it educates soldiers fighting in the cyber and electronic warfare domains. Rather than training soldiers on step-by-step processes, the service is educating personnel to come up with their own solutions on a technologically complex battlefield.

August 23, 2018
By George I. Seffers
David May, senior intelligence advisor, U.S. Army Cyber Center of Excellence and Fort Gordon, Georgia, speaks during a panel at the AFCEA TechNet Augusta conference. Photo by Michael Carpenter

The U.S. Army is poised to implement five force design changes related to the integration of multidomain capabilities, including intelligence, cyber and electronic warfare. The integration of such capabilities is designed to allow commanders to act more quickly on the cyber-era battlefield.

David May, senior intelligence advisor, U.S. Army Cyber Center of Excellence and Fort Gordon, Georgia, explained the changes while serving on a multidomain panel at the AFCEA TechNet Augusta conference.

August 10, 2018
By Kimberly Underwood
The commercial sector continues to implement new electronic warfare (EW) technology, pushing towards multifunction, multi-domain applications. Sierra Nevada’s mobile land-based system, called Modi, defends against unmanned vehicle threats as well as traditional EW threats. Credit: Sierra Nevada Corp.

As electronic warfare is re-emerging as a key battlefield function, the commercial sector is striving to offer advanced technologies. Land-based systems are needed to combat both ground and airborne adversarial threats, while airborne electronic warfare tools provide maneuverable tactics to marque aircraft.

The focus of Sierra Nevada Corporation’s (SNC’s) dismounted electronic countermeasure system, known as Modi, has evolved from defeating radio-controlled improvised explosive devices (RCIEDs) to being a multi-function electronic warfare (EW) tool, explained Jerry Coburn, director, business development, SNC, during a recent interview with SIGNAL Magazine.

August 6, 2018
 

Harris Corporation, based in Melbourne, Florida, reported that it would be supplying electronic warfare (EW) systems to other allied militaries to protect international F-16s from advanced radio frequency threats, according to an August 6 company statement. Under the award, which is a $400 million increase to the ceiling value of a single-award indefinite deliver/indefinite quantity (IDIQ) contract, the company will provide AN/ALQ-211(V)4/9 Advanced Integrated Defensive Electronic Warfare Suite (AIDEWS) systems, spares and engineering support to several allied countries.

July 27, 2018
 

Raytheon Co., Fort Wayne, Indiana, was awarded a $49,025,060 modification (P00005) to contract W15P7T-14-D-C006 for the development of Electronic Warfare Program Management Tool, Capability Drop 4 (CD4) along with interim contractor support required for the maintenance and fielding of CD3 through CD4. Work will be performed in Fort Wayne, Indiana, with an estimated completion date of September 30, 2022. Fiscal year 2018 research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $1 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, is the contracting activity.

July 20, 2018
 

Leidos Innovations Corp., Gaithersburg, Maryland, is awarded $15,948,573 for cost-plus-fixed-fee order N6893618F0598 against a previously awarded indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract (N68936-16-D-0018). This order provides for the procurement of 135 Joint Threat Emitter spare parts for the repair and sustainment of Electronic Warfare Target/Threat systems deployed at test and training ranges in support of the Air Force. Work will be performed at the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division, China Lake, California, and is expected to be completed in July 2019. Fiscal year 2016 and 2017 other procurement (Air Force) funds in the amount of $5,948,674 are being obligated at the time of award, $96,095 of which will expire at the

July 2, 2018
 

Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., McLean, Virginia, been awarded a $23,608,513 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for research and development of the precise reference sensing for collaborative electronic warfare program.  The purpose of the will be to perform on-site positioning, navigation and timing technology development; prototyping; integration; and modeling, simulation, wargaming and analysis. Work will be performed at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, and is expected to be completed by June 29, 2023. The award is the result of a competitive acquisition.

May 1, 2018
By George I. Seffers
An electronic warfare specialist trains on the Versatile Radio Observation and Direction system at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii. Credit: Staff Sgt. Armando R. Limon, USA, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division

After years of lagging behind competitors in the battle for electromagnetic spectrum dominance, the U.S. Army may be catching up with reinforcement from technology researchers. But it may be the application of technology rather than the systems themselves that truly gives the Army an edge.

Service leaders say they lost focus on electronic warfare and information warfare capabilities while preoccupied with the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, where cutting-edge technologies were not a necessity. Now, they contend, the next war likely will be against a foe capable of formidable offense and defense in the electromagnetic domain.

March 7, 2018
By George I. Seffers
Lt. Gen. Paul Ostrowski, USA, speak at the AFCEA Army Signal Conference. Photo by Michael Carpenter

U.S. Army officials are applying a streamlined acquisition process known as an IT box to offensive cyber technologies.

The IT box acquisition concept includes four sides: developing the capabilities requirement, determining development costs, analyzing sustainment and operations costs, and providing oversight and management of the product.

Maj. Gen. John George, USA, force development director, Office of the Army Chief of Staff G-8, told the the AFCEA Army Signal Conference in Springfield, Virginia, that the Army is focusing on the IT box concept pretty heavily.

March 8, 2018
By George I. Seffers
Ronald Pontius, deputy to the commanding general, U.S. Army Cyber Command and 2nd Army, speaks at the AFCEA Army Signal Conference.

U.S. military officials may be enjoying increased funding under the fiscal 2018 and 2019 budgets, but an Army general is warning that the 2020 budget could return to sequestration levels—and young soldiers on the battlefield will be the ones paying the price for a failure to plan ahead.

March 5, 2018
By Sam Cohen
U.S. adversaries are integrating cyber and electronic warfare. U.S. forces must do the same. Credit: geralt/Pixabay

To succeed in the battlespace of the future and to ensure combat superiority over peer adversaries, the U.S. military must be equipped with capabilities to defend information networks in cyberspace and to secure unimpeded access to the electromagnetic spectrum. Adversaries are developing cyber and electronic warfare capabilities to conduct information operations against U.S. systems that will likely threaten the speed and accuracy of military communications, intelligence and data sharing channels, while maliciously altering or stealing the information itself. These capabilities often have complementary effects, which means integrating cyber and electronic warfare could provide a stronger protection and attack capacity for U.S.

February 8, 2018
 

Lockheed Martin Rotary and Mission Systems, Liverpool, New York, is being awarded an $11,525,263 cost-plus-incentive-fee modification to a previously awarded contract (N00024-17-C-5353) to exercise options for engineering, manufacturing and development for advanced off-board electronic warfare (AOEW). The AOEW program will provide an electronic warfare mission package to integrate with a flight vehicle.

February 7, 2018
By Robert K. Ackerman
Vice Adm. Jan Tighe, USN, deputy chief of Naval Operations for Information Warfare (N2N6), describes the challenges facing Navy information warfare during her keynote luncheon speech at West 2018.

New technologies, capabilities and tactics will be necessary for the U.S. Navy to prevail in the burgeoning arena of information warfare. But while some needs are obvious, the course for the overall way ahead remains elusive.

Explaining the complicated nature of naval information warfare was Vice Adm. Jan Tighe, USN, deputy chief of Naval Operations for Information Warfare (N2N6). Speaking at the Wednesday keynote luncheon at West 2018 being held in San Diego February 6-8, Adm. Tighe outlined a series of challenges and potential options, beginning with the state of the realm.

December 14, 2017
By Kimberly Underwood
From left, the Army’s Maj. Gen. Patricia Frost, Maj. Gen. John Morrison, and Maj. Gen. David Lacquement (Ret.) discuss at a recent AUSA event how the Army is integrating electronic warfare capabilities into a multifunction approach with cyber and intelligence operations.

The Army is looking to combine electronic warfare capabilities with intelligence and cyber capabilities, military leaders reported December 13 at AUSA’s Institute of Land Warfare discussion, The Future Force Build and Integration of Electronic Warfare and Information Operations Fields into Cyber. AUSA hosted the event at its headquarters in Arlington, Virginia, as part of its Hot Topic event series.

November 1, 2017
By Robert K. Ackerman
The Russian Krasukha-2 electronic warfare (EW) system is designed to jam airborne early warning aircraft radar from as far away as 250 kilometers (155 miles). Russia has committed billions of rubles to advancing its EW capabilities for use in conflicts against NATO nations, according to a recent think-tank report. Wikimedia Commons/Vitaly V. Kuzmin

Russia has advanced the state of the art in electronic warfare capabilities to overcome and even overpower Western electronic systems, both military and commercial. And now the country’s military modernization plan extending to 2025 lays the groundwork for further advancement, according to a recent European think tank report.

Russia is developing a total package of electronic warfare (EW) systems covering a broad frequency range. The systems encompass traditional areas such as surveillance, protection and countermeasures, and they shield Russian use of the electromagnetic spectrum (EMS). These total package systems are designed to be highly mobile and include small units deployable by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs).

November 1, 2017
By George I. Seffers

A number of emerging technologies, including integrated photonics, microdrones and automation tools, will drive an improved perception of available electromagnetic spectrum by U.S. warfighters and enhanced effectiveness in electronic warfare, says William Conley, deputy director, electronic warfare, Office of the Undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics.

November 1, 2017
By George I. Seffers
A B-2 Spirit lands at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The B-2 Defense Management System Modernization program includes upgrades to electronic warfare systems.

William Conley has a long to-do list.

He serves on the U.S. Defense Department’s Electronic Warfare (EW) Executive Committee, which helped draft the department’s EW strategy, signed earlier this year. Now, the deputy director of electronic warfare in the Office of the Undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics is helping to put together an implementation plan for that strategy, which he expects to be signed in the spring.

November 1, 2017
By George I. Seffers

U.S. Defense Department researchers are testing cognitive electronic warfare technologies that within the next decade could autonomously counter adversary systems without preprogramming. The capability may allow the military to eclipse its adversaries in the electronic warfare domain.

Three closely related Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) programs apply artificial intelligence to the electromagnetic spectrum and will likely result in electronic warfare (EW) systems with unprecedented autonomy. The first two—Adaptive Radar Countermeasures (ARC) and Behavioral Learning for Adaptive Electronic Warfare (BLADE) are considered sister programs. Both apply artificial intelligence, or AI, to EW systems.

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