electronic warfare

November 2, 2020
 

L3 Harris Technologies Inc., Clifton, New Jersey, has been awarded a $97,505,000 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract to provide repair and return (R&R) services for unclassified and classified line-replaceable unit/standard equipment module assets of the ALQ-211 (V)4, (V)8, and (V)9 systems of the airborne F-16 Advanced Integrated Defense Electronic Warfare Suite (AIDEWS) weapon systems. This contract involves Foreign Military Sales (FMS) to support air forces of Chile, India, Oman, Pakistan, Poland, Turkey, Iraq and Morocco. Procurement of these R&R logistical support services is necessary to restore F-16 AIDEWS systems to mission capable condition and to equip partnering F-16 FMS fleets with airborne self-defense a

October 27, 2020
By George I. Seffers
Staff Sgt. Keila Peters, USA, an embedded noncommissioned officer within the Army C5ISR Center, conducts testing on equipment for the command post survivability effort during Network Modernization Experiment 20 at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, New Jersey, July 27, 2020. The Army's new deputy chief of staff for G6 has laid out three pillars for his restructured office that include cyber, signal, electronic warfare and networking priorities. Credit: U.S. Army C5ISR Center photo/Jasmyne Douglas

During an October 27 telephonic roundtable discussion with reporters, Lt. Gen. John Morrison, USA, Army Deputy Chief of Staff, G-6, revealed four pillars for the restructured office. They include building a unified network; posturing signal, cyber and electronic warfare forces for multidomain operations; reforming and operationalizing cybersecurity processes; and driving effective and efficient network and cyber investments.

October 21, 2020
By Kimberly Underwood
From l-r, U. S. Army Sgt. Cody Conklin of the 4th Infantry Division from Ft. Carson, Colorado, and Sgt. Carl Higgins, USA, of the Intelligence, Information, Cyber, Electronic Warfare and Space, or I2CEWS, formation from Joint Base Lewis McCord, WA, detect and mitigate adversarial radio signals during Cyber Blitz 19. The I2CEWS have made good progress since then, in integrating advanced capabilities for multidomain operations. Credit: U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command by Edric Thompson

The U.S. Army continues to improve the cyberspace and electronic warfare capabilities of its soldiers. A key part of this effort are the changes the service is making to its Cyber Corps formations, and how they organize and add cyberspace and electronic warfare (EW) personnel to their ranks, said Brig. Gen. Paul Craft, USA, chief of cyber and commandant of the U.S. Army Cyber School headquartered at Fort Gordon, Georgia.

July 30, 2020
By George I. Seffers
The Army’s CCDC C5ISR Center uses field experimentation, such as the annual Network Modernization Experiment, to evaluate the maturity of DOD and industry technologies early in the research and development cycle and in a relevant, threat-based environment. Credit: U.S. Army

During the Army’s Network Modernization Experiment 2020 that kicked off last week, researchers are attacking fledgling systems with electronic warfare capabilities that near-peer adversaries are not expected to possess for years to come, officials say.

July 1, 2020
By George I. Seffers
The NETCOM Network Enterprise Center provided extended information technology support to many of the units deploying in support of Joint Task Force-Civil Support during the COVID-19 pandemic. U.S. Army Cyber Command has now delegated to NETCOM some its authorities for protecting Army portions of the Department of Defense Information Network. U.S. Army photo by Spc. Chafelmer Kroll

The U.S. Army Cyber Command is transferring some of its cyber defense responsibilities for the service’s networks to the Army Network Enterprise Technology Command, commonly known as NETCOM. The change, which officially took effect on June 1, transfers authority for the Army’s worldwide regional cyber centers to NETCOM, allows Cyber Command to increase its focus on electronic warfare and information operations and provides one primary point of contact for warfighters in need of network support.

June 12, 2020
 

Engility Corp., Andover, Massachusetts, is awarded a $7,956,180 modification (P00010) to a previously awarded cost-plus-fixed-fee, cost reimbursable order (N68936-19-F-0379) against a General Services Administration One Acquisition Solution for Integrated Services Multiple Award Contract (GS00Q14OADU336). Work will be performed in Point Mugu, California (90%); Whidbey Island, Washington (1.67%); Patuxent River, Maryland (1.67%); China Lake, California (1.67%); Baltimore, Maryland (1.67%); St. Louis, Missouri (1.67%); and El Segundo, California (1.65%).

June 8, 2020
 

L3Harris Technologies Inc., Clifton, New Jersey, has been awarded an estimated $70,000,746 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery requirements contract for AN/ALQ-161A radio frequency surveillance/electronic countermeasures system line replaceable units and shop replaceable units. This contract provides for the repair of 154 national stock numbers applicable to the B1-B aircraft/electronic countermeasures. Work will be performed in Amityville, New York, and is expected to be completed June 5, 2025. This award is the result of a sole-source acquisition. Fiscal 2020 consolidated sustainment activity group-engineering funds will be used to fund individual orders issued against the basic contract.

June 1, 2020
 

Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., has been awarded a $19,354,527 firm-fixed-price requirements contract for the repairs, spares and engineering services relating to the electronic systems test set, ALQ-155 power management system, ALQ-161 defensive avionics system (DAS) and Band 6/7/9 of B-1B ALQ-161 DAS. Work will be performed in Rolling Meadows, Illinois, and is expected to be completed by Sept. 9, 2028. This award is the result of a non-competitive acquisition. Fiscal 2020 defense working capital funds are being used and no funds are being obligated at the time of the award. The Air Force Sustainment Center, Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, is the contracting activity (FA8524-20-D-0011).

May 14, 2020
 

Strategic Airborne Operations JV LLC,* Newport News, Virginia, is awarded a $146,834,175 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract. The contract acquires the High Endurance Electronic Warfare Jet (HEEWJ) capability. Work will be performed in Cherry Point, North Carolina (5%); and various locations within and outside the continental U.S.

April 29, 2020
 

The Boeing Co., St. Louis, Missouri, is awarded a $9,669,789 cost-plus-fixed-fee modification (P00034) to previously awarded contract N00019-16-C-0032. This modification provides engineering, manufacturing and development support to integrate BRR3.1 software to the Next Generation Jammer on Boeing EA-18G Growler carrier-based electronic warfare aircraft, resulting in BRR3.1 software initial operating capability. Work will be performed in St. Louis, Missouri, and is expected to be complete by December 2020. Fiscal 2020 research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $3,000,000 will be obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year.

March 1, 2020
By George I. Seffers
The Army Rapid Capabilities Office uses the Network Integration Evaluation exercises to gain soldier feedback on electronic warfare prototypes. The service expects to make advances this year on reintroducing sophisticated electronic warfare technologies back into the force.  Original image by Sgt. Maricris C.McLane, 24th Press Camp Headquarters. Edited by Chris D’Elia.

This year the Army will take several steps in the march toward reintroducing cutting-edge electronic warfare systems capable of countering near-peer competitors.

March 1, 2020
By Kimberly Underwood
The Army’s Integrated Tactical Network will leverage emerging mid-earth-orbit satellite communications, among other advanced technologies.  Shutterstock/Andrey Armyagov/NASA

The U.S. Army’s work on advancing its tactical network through its “capability package construct” will pull in significant capacity, added resiliency and interoperability, leaders say. The Army is leveraging more commercial solutions than ever, as well as its own Science and Technology Directorate research and development, to bring a competitive edge.

As part of its latest pursuit of solutions for the Integrated Tactical Network concept, or ITN, the Army is going after high capacity commercial satellite communications, protected waveforms, mid-earth-orbit constellations, and space-based Internet.

February 19, 2020
 

Lockheed Martin Rotary and Mission Systems, Syracuse, New York, is awarded a $40,000,000 cost-plus-incentive-fee and cost-only modification to a previously-awarded delivery order N00024-19-F-6201 under an indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract (N00024-19-D-6200) for the design, prototyping and qualification testing for electronic warfare systems equipment. This effort will award the design of Navy equipment. Work will be performed in Syracuse, New York, and is expected to be completed by February 2021. Fiscal year 2020 research, development, test and evaluation (Navy) funding for $8,207,000 will be obligated at time of award and not expire at the end of the current fiscal year.

February 4, 2020
 
Boeing and the U.S. Navy have demonstrated that one EA-18G Growler can be used to autonomously control two others. Credit: Boeing

Boeing and the U.S. Navy successfully flew two autonomously controlled EA-18G Growlers at Naval Air Station Patuxent River as unmanned air systems using a third Growler as a mission controller for the other two, Boeing has announced.

The flights, conducted during the Navy Warfare Development Command’s annual fleet experiment (FLEX) exercises, proved the effectiveness of technology allowing F/A-18 Super Hornets and EA-18G Growlers to perform combat missions with unmanned systems.

January 28, 2020
 

Lockheed Martin Corp., Rotary Mission Systems, Liverpool, New York, is awarded a $185,025,000 firm-fixed-price contract for follow-on full rate production of Surface Electronic Warfare Improvement Program AN/SLQ-32(V)6, AN/SLQ-32A(V)6 and AN/SLQ-32C(V)6 systems.  Surface Electronic Warfare Improvement Program (SEWIP) is an evolutionary acquisition and incremental development program to upgrade the existing AN/SLQ-32(V) electronic warfare system.

April 12, 2019
By Kimberly Underwood
Col. Dave Burton, USMC, program manager, Intelligence Systems, USMC Systems Command, notes that organizational changes are helping the Marines bring forth signals intelligence capabilities.

In an era of complex geopolitics of peer and near-peer adversaries racing to advance electronic warfare (EW), the U.S. Marine Corps, like the other services, is centering on improving its signals intelligence (SIGINT) and electronic warfare operations. The service is examining its training and how it integrates the capabilities into its battalions. 

The Marine Corps’ efforts in so-called SIGINT and EW was the focus of this year’s Signals Intelligence Day held on Capitol Hill and organized by the Association of Old Crows Advocacy’s Signals Intelligence Industry Partnership. 

March 14, 2019
By Kimberly Underwood
Gaining experience with information operations in Afghanistan and hosting several pilot programs will help the rise of the U.S. Army’s information warfare capabilities and aid the transformation of the Cyber Command into an information operations warfare command, says Lt. Gen. Stephen Fogarty, USA, commanding general, Army Cyber Command. Photo by Michael Carpenter

The Army is transforming its Cyber Command to meet the challenges of a multidomain battlefield. Just over eight years old, the command, located at Ft. Gordon, Georgia, will evolve by 2028 into something possibly called the Army Information Warfare Operations Command, which will fully incorporate cyber, electronic warfare and information operations.

November 20, 2019
By Kimberly Underwood
The 16th Air Force (Air Forces Cyber) provides information warfare capabilities to all of the U.S. Air Force’s air components and several U.S. Combatant Commands, as well as cyber representation to the U.S. Cyber Command, explains Lt. Gen. Timothy Haugh, USAF, commander, 16th Air Force (Air Forces Cyber) at the AFCEA Alamo Chapter’s ACE event.

Less than two months on the job, Lt. Gen. Timothy Haugh, USAF, commander of the 16th Air Force (Air Forces Cyber), is already shaping the structure of the service’s new information warfare Numbered Air Force (NAF). Stood up in October, the NAF combines the service’s cyber operations; intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) capabilities; electronic warfare and information operations, including capabilities folded in from the 24th and 25th Air Forces.

October 8, 2019
 

New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, New Mexico, has been awarded a $92,980,000 cost-reimbursement, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for Playas Electronic Attack & Cyber Environment research and development. This contract will define, develop and deploy cyber electronic warfare (EW) capabilities for research and development, evaluation, test and training in support of employment of cyber EW effects. DOD reported that the effort would "provide a unique and enduring environment to support Department of Defense assets for the employment of cyber and EW effects." Work will be performed in Playas, New Mexico, and is expected to be completed by October 7, 2026.

September 13, 2019
 

Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., Herndon, Virginia, is awarded a $57,462,554 cost-plus-fixed-fee modification to a previously awarded contract N00024-17-C-6327 to exercise options for engineering support services for the Joint Counter Radio-Controlled Improvised Explosive Device Electronic Warfare Increment One Block One (I1B1) Systems full-rate production in support of the Expeditionary Warfare program office. This option exercise is for Engineering Support Services for Joint Counter Radio-Controlled Improvised Explosive Device Electronic Warfare (JCREW) to introduce new technologies; address diminishing material and depot repairs to keep JCREW systems viable for future production; and maintain operational readiness for the field.  Work

August 23, 2019
By George I. Seffers
The Multi-Function Electronic Warfare-Air Large program will integrate an offensive electronic warfare pod onto an MQ-1C Gray Eagle unmanned aircraft system. It, along with two other programs, offers the Army an opportunity for interoperability. Credit: U.S. Army

The U.S. Army is enjoying a renaissance period for cyber and electronic warfare (EW) technologies and has a chance to lay a foundation of interoperability in cyber systems, says Col. Kevin Finch, USA, program manager for electronic warfare and cyber within the Program Executive Office-Intelligence, Electronic Warfare and Sensors.

Col. Finch made the comments on the final day of the AFCEA TechNet Augusta conference 2019 in Augusta, Georgia. AFCEA added an extra day to the annual conference to highlight procurement and acquisition.

July 9, 2019
 

Georgia Tech Applied Research Corp., Atlanta, Georgia, has been awarded a $245,994,000 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for electronic warfare and avionics system support Georgia Tech Applied Research University and Affiliated Research Center. This contract provides for essential engineering, research and development capabilities and services for the development and sustainment of systems. Work will be performed at Atlanta, Georgia, and is expected to be completed by July 8, 2029. Future orders may include foreign military sales to multiple countries. This award is the result of a sole-source acquisition.

June 5, 2019
 

Rohde & Schwarz USA, Inc., Columbia, Maryland, is awarded a $7,327,350 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for vector network analyzers to support the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Corona Division, Measurement Science and Engineering Department. The vector network analyzers are used to calibrate various devices such as attenuators, power sensors, filters, terminations and other microwave passive devices. Work will be performed in Columbia, Maryland, and is expected to be completed by June 2024. Fiscal year 2019 other procurement (Navy) funding in the amount of $146,547 will be obligated at time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year.

May 21, 2019
Posted by Kimberly Underwood
The new 87th Electronic Warfare Squadron at the U.S. Air Force’s 53rd Wing will provide key electronic warfare and cyber assessments to combat and mobility air forces at the major commands across the globe. Pictured are Air Force F-16 aircraft from a recent combat exercise at Hill Air Force Base, Utah on May 1. U.S. Air Force photo by R. Nial Bradshaw

On May 17, the 53rd Wing of the U.S. Air Force at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida celebrated the establishment of its new 87th Electronic Warfare Squadron that will join the wing’s 53rd Electronic Warfare Group.

April 11, 2019
 

American Electronic Warfare Associates Inc., California, Maryland, is awarded a $99,749,577 cost-plus-fixed-fee, cost reimbursable indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract. The contract provides engineering and technical services in support of the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division’s Battlespace Modeling and Simulation.

March 21, 2019
 

Lockheed Martin Rotary and Mission Systems, Syracuse, New York, is awarded a $27,510,334 cost-plus-incentive-fee modification to previously-awarded contract N00024-09-C-6247 for the procurement of fiscal year 2019 electronic warfare AN/BLQ-10 kits and spares to support program requirements. Work will be performed in Syracuse, New York (99 percent); and Manassas, Virginia (1 percent), and is expected to be completed by October 2022. Fiscal year 2019 other procurement (Navy) funding in the amount of $27,510,334 will be obligated at time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity.

March 1, 2019
By George I. Seffers
The Air Combat Command, which is taking the lead for cyber operations from the Air Force Space Command, is building a new division that integrates cyber, intelligence, electronic warfare and information warfare capabilities. Artist’s depiction of a digitized F-22 based on a U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Michael Holzworth.

The newly created Cyber and Non-Kinetic Operations Division within the Air Combat Command is expected to reach full strength this summer. The new organization integrates multiple missions, including cyber, electronic warfare, intelligence and information warfare.

February 15, 2019
 

Bell Boeing Joint Project Office, Amarillo, Texas, was awarded $10,656,686 for modification P00002 to a previously issued delivery order (N0001918F1645) placed against basic ordering agreement, N00019-17-G-0002. This modification exercises the option to procure 12 A-Kits to retrofit legacy fleet aircraft with the AN/APR-39D(V)2, AN/AAQ-24B(V)27, and the ALE-47 Power Performance Computing, upgrading the MV-22 from Configuration A to Configuration C. In addition, this modification provides for the procurement of 12 APR-39D(V)2 A-Kits to install the AN/APR-39D (V)2 system on any of the 48 previously Integrated Aircraft Survivability Equipment retrofitted aircraft, upgrading the MV-22 from Configuration B to Configuration C.

January 16, 2019
 

Global Technical Systems Inc.*, Virginia Beach, Virginia, is awarded an $8,510,970 firm-fixed–price delivery order N00024-19-F-5610 under previously awarded indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract N00024-14-D-5213 for the procurement of 15 Common Processing System (CPS) Technical Instruction Twelve Hybrid (TI-12H) water-cooled production units for Surface Electronic Warfare Improvement Program and two CPS TI-12H air-cooled production units for ship self defense systems.

November 1, 2018
By Kimberly Underwood
Metadata from communication signals can provide a nonencrypted source of signals intelligence, says David Stupples, professor, School of Mathematics, Computer Science and Engineering, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, City, University of London.  Shutterstock/Sutham

Data from mobile device signals such as GSM may be an untapped resource for signals intelligence on the battlefield. Although the payload of a communication system is encoded, information about the nature of the communication that is included in the GSM signal is not and should not be overlooked. This information, known as metadata, could prove to be an important tool for warfighters, experts say.

November 1, 2018
By George I. Seffers

For three years, the U.S. Army has been asking questions about how to converge cyberspace operations, electronic warfare and spectrum management capabilities at the corps level and below to deny, degrade, destroy and manipulate enemy capabilities. Now, officials say, they are drawing closer to answers.

In 2015, the service created a pilot program known as Cyberspace Electromagnetic Activity (CEMA) Support to Corps and Below. The CEMA concept integrates elements from offensive and defensive cyber, electronic warfare, and intelligence into expeditionary teams that support tactical units.

October 18, 2018
 

Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., doing business as Northrop Grumman Mission Systems Sector, Bethpage, New York, is awarded a $697,029,788 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for system upgrades for the EA-18G system configuration sets, Airborne Electronic Attack and Electronic Warfare systems and final upgrades for the EA-6B system for the Navy and the government of Australia under the Foreign Military Sales program. Work will be performed in Pt. Mugu, California (50 percent); Baltimore, Maryland (29 percent); Bethpage, New York (20 percent); and Rolling Meadows, Illinois (1 percent), and is expected to be completed in October 2023.

October 1, 2018
By George I. Seffers
Soldiers from the 25th Infantry Division in Hawaii and from U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Centers of Excellence participate in the Army's Cyber Blitz in April 2016 at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, New Jersey. Cyber Blitz provides the Army a way to learn about cyber and electromagnetic activity. U.S. Army CERDEC photo by Kristen Kushiyama

The U.S. Army’s Cyber Blitz experimental exercise September 17-28 turned out to be an eye-opener for one maneuver officer regarding cyber’s capabilities on the battlefield.

Military leaders often describe the “speed of cyber” as being measured in milliseconds or microseconds, which means the operations tempo in the cyber realm is incredibly high and decisions are made rapidly. But an offensive cyber campaign can sometimes take much longer than maneuver commanders might expect. In a teleconference with reporters to discuss Cyber Blitz results, Lt. Col. John Newman, USA, deputy commanding officer, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, reports that the experiment proved to be a revelation.

October 1, 2018
By Dustan Hellwig
Staff Sgt. Kristoffer Perez, USA, Cyber Electromagnetic Activities section, 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, carries a dismounted electronic warfare kit that allows him to work in concert with the rest of his section. To get inside an enemy’s OODA loop, commanders will need a way to see how electronic warfare is affecting the battlespace. Photo by Sgt. Michael C. Roach, 19th Public Affairs Detachment

Work is needed to improve temporal, spectral and information understanding within the layers of the cyber domain to facilitate useful cyber-spectral and information maneuver. These advances could be incorporated into tactics, techniques and procedures as well as tactical and operational systems to enhance the overall military commanders’ decision process to achieve information dominance.

Most of the tactical cyberspace domain is spectrum-dependent and administered solely at the physical layer. Currently, warfighters cannot comprehend, much less maneuver within, a space that is inaccessible to them because they are not in a dimensionality to understand it. They operate in a cyber-spectral flatland.

September 27, 2018
 

DCS Corp., Alexandria, Virginia, has been awarded a $16,252,479 modification (P00045) to previously awarded FA2486-16-F-0032 for Technical and Management Advisory Services Electronic Warfare support. The contractor will provide additional research, development, test and evaluation, and acquisition support services. Work will be performed at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida; and Edwards Air Force Base, California, and is expected to be completed by September 30, 2019. Fiscal year 2018 and 2019 research and development; procurement; and operations and maintenance funds in the amount of $2,161,841 are being obligated at the time of award. Total cumulative face value of the contract is $30,469,693.

September 18, 2018
 

Northrup Grumman Systems Corp., Linthicum Heights, Maryland, is awarded a $9,000,000 cost-only modification to previously awarded contract N00024-15-C-5319 for long lead material for Surface Electronic Warfare Improvement Program (SEWIP) Block 3 low-rate initial production. The SEWIP is an evolutionary acquisition and incremental development program to upgrade the existing AN/SLQ-32(V) electronic warfare system. SEWIP Block 3 will provide select Navy surface ships a scalable electronic warfare enterprise suite with improved electronic attack capabilities. Work will be performed in Linthicum, Maryland (98 percent); and Los Angeles, California (2 percent), and is expected to be completed by November 2020.

August 28, 2018
 

SRC Inc., North Syracuse, New York, was awarded a $33,280,064 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for Electronic Warfare Integrated Reprogramming, analysis, production and process support services. One bid was solicited with one bid received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of August 26, 2023. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Warren, Michigan, is the contracting activity (W911W5-18-D-0002).

August 23, 2018
By George I. Seffers
Maj. Gen. John Morrison Jr., USA, commanding general of the Army Cyber Center of Excellence, moderates a panel at the AFCEA TechNet Augusta conference. Photo by Michael Carpenter

The U.S. Army is making multiple changes to the way it educates soldiers fighting in the cyber and electronic warfare domains. Rather than training soldiers on step-by-step processes, the service is educating personnel to come up with their own solutions on a technologically complex battlefield.

August 23, 2018
By George I. Seffers
David May, senior intelligence advisor, U.S. Army Cyber Center of Excellence and Fort Gordon, Georgia, speaks during a panel at the AFCEA TechNet Augusta conference. Photo by Michael Carpenter

The U.S. Army is poised to implement five force design changes related to the integration of multidomain capabilities, including intelligence, cyber and electronic warfare. The integration of such capabilities is designed to allow commanders to act more quickly on the cyber-era battlefield.

David May, senior intelligence advisor, U.S. Army Cyber Center of Excellence and Fort Gordon, Georgia, explained the changes while serving on a multidomain panel at the AFCEA TechNet Augusta conference.

August 10, 2018
By Kimberly Underwood
The commercial sector continues to implement new electronic warfare (EW) technology, pushing towards multifunction, multi-domain applications. Sierra Nevada’s mobile land-based system, called Modi, defends against unmanned vehicle threats as well as traditional EW threats. Credit: Sierra Nevada Corp.

As electronic warfare is re-emerging as a key battlefield function, the commercial sector is striving to offer advanced technologies. Land-based systems are needed to combat both ground and airborne adversarial threats, while airborne electronic warfare tools provide maneuverable tactics to marque aircraft.

The focus of Sierra Nevada Corporation’s (SNC’s) dismounted electronic countermeasure system, known as Modi, has evolved from defeating radio-controlled improvised explosive devices (RCIEDs) to being a multi-function electronic warfare (EW) tool, explained Jerry Coburn, director, business development, SNC, during a recent interview with SIGNAL Magazine.

August 6, 2018
 

Harris Corporation, based in Melbourne, Florida, reported that it would be supplying electronic warfare (EW) systems to other allied militaries to protect international F-16s from advanced radio frequency threats, according to an August 6 company statement. Under the award, which is a $400 million increase to the ceiling value of a single-award indefinite deliver/indefinite quantity (IDIQ) contract, the company will provide AN/ALQ-211(V)4/9 Advanced Integrated Defensive Electronic Warfare Suite (AIDEWS) systems, spares and engineering support to several allied countries.

July 27, 2018
 

Raytheon Co., Fort Wayne, Indiana, was awarded a $49,025,060 modification (P00005) to contract W15P7T-14-D-C006 for the development of Electronic Warfare Program Management Tool, Capability Drop 4 (CD4) along with interim contractor support required for the maintenance and fielding of CD3 through CD4. Work will be performed in Fort Wayne, Indiana, with an estimated completion date of September 30, 2022. Fiscal year 2018 research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $1 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, is the contracting activity.

July 20, 2018
 

Leidos Innovations Corp., Gaithersburg, Maryland, is awarded $15,948,573 for cost-plus-fixed-fee order N6893618F0598 against a previously awarded indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract (N68936-16-D-0018). This order provides for the procurement of 135 Joint Threat Emitter spare parts for the repair and sustainment of Electronic Warfare Target/Threat systems deployed at test and training ranges in support of the Air Force. Work will be performed at the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division, China Lake, California, and is expected to be completed in July 2019. Fiscal year 2016 and 2017 other procurement (Air Force) funds in the amount of $5,948,674 are being obligated at the time of award, $96,095 of which will expire at the

July 2, 2018
 

Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., McLean, Virginia, been awarded a $23,608,513 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for research and development of the precise reference sensing for collaborative electronic warfare program.  The purpose of the will be to perform on-site positioning, navigation and timing technology development; prototyping; integration; and modeling, simulation, wargaming and analysis. Work will be performed at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, and is expected to be completed by June 29, 2023. The award is the result of a competitive acquisition.

May 1, 2018
By George I. Seffers
An electronic warfare specialist trains on the Versatile Radio Observation and Direction system at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii. Credit: Staff Sgt. Armando R. Limon, USA, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division

After years of lagging behind competitors in the battle for electromagnetic spectrum dominance, the U.S. Army may be catching up with reinforcement from technology researchers. But it may be the application of technology rather than the systems themselves that truly gives the Army an edge.

Service leaders say they lost focus on electronic warfare and information warfare capabilities while preoccupied with the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, where cutting-edge technologies were not a necessity. Now, they contend, the next war likely will be against a foe capable of formidable offense and defense in the electromagnetic domain.

March 7, 2018
By George I. Seffers
Lt. Gen. Paul Ostrowski, USA, speak at the AFCEA Army Signal Conference. Photo by Michael Carpenter

U.S. Army officials are applying a streamlined acquisition process known as an IT box to offensive cyber technologies.

The IT box acquisition concept includes four sides: developing the capabilities requirement, determining development costs, analyzing sustainment and operations costs, and providing oversight and management of the product.

Maj. Gen. John George, USA, force development director, Office of the Army Chief of Staff G-8, told the the AFCEA Army Signal Conference in Springfield, Virginia, that the Army is focusing on the IT box concept pretty heavily.

March 8, 2018
By George I. Seffers
Ronald Pontius, deputy to the commanding general, U.S. Army Cyber Command and 2nd Army, speaks at the AFCEA Army Signal Conference.

U.S. military officials may be enjoying increased funding under the fiscal 2018 and 2019 budgets, but an Army general is warning that the 2020 budget could return to sequestration levels—and young soldiers on the battlefield will be the ones paying the price for a failure to plan ahead.

March 5, 2018
By Sam Cohen
U.S. adversaries are integrating cyber and electronic warfare. U.S. forces must do the same. Credit: geralt/Pixabay

To succeed in the battlespace of the future and to ensure combat superiority over peer adversaries, the U.S. military must be equipped with capabilities to defend information networks in cyberspace and to secure unimpeded access to the electromagnetic spectrum. Adversaries are developing cyber and electronic warfare capabilities to conduct information operations against U.S. systems that will likely threaten the speed and accuracy of military communications, intelligence and data sharing channels, while maliciously altering or stealing the information itself. These capabilities often have complementary effects, which means integrating cyber and electronic warfare could provide a stronger protection and attack capacity for U.S.

February 8, 2018
 

Lockheed Martin Rotary and Mission Systems, Liverpool, New York, is being awarded an $11,525,263 cost-plus-incentive-fee modification to a previously awarded contract (N00024-17-C-5353) to exercise options for engineering, manufacturing and development for advanced off-board electronic warfare (AOEW). The AOEW program will provide an electronic warfare mission package to integrate with a flight vehicle.

February 7, 2018
By Robert K. Ackerman
Vice Adm. Jan Tighe, USN, deputy chief of Naval Operations for Information Warfare (N2N6), describes the challenges facing Navy information warfare during her keynote luncheon speech at West 2018.

New technologies, capabilities and tactics will be necessary for the U.S. Navy to prevail in the burgeoning arena of information warfare. But while some needs are obvious, the course for the overall way ahead remains elusive.

Explaining the complicated nature of naval information warfare was Vice Adm. Jan Tighe, USN, deputy chief of Naval Operations for Information Warfare (N2N6). Speaking at the Wednesday keynote luncheon at West 2018 being held in San Diego February 6-8, Adm. Tighe outlined a series of challenges and potential options, beginning with the state of the realm.