gaming

March 20, 2018
By Kimberly Underwood
Air Force Tech Sgt. Matthew Coutts launches a Raven B Digital Data Link drone during a demonstration in Southwest Asia in January. The Navy is developing a video game-based tool to evaluate the skills of potential unmanned vehicle operators. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Joshua Kleinhol

The rapid increase in the use of unmanned vehicles has created a demand for the U.S. Navy to find talented drone operators. Typically, the Navy has assigned aviators to operate drones, but this has taken away from their traditional aviation assignments, according to an article from Warren Duffie of Office of Naval Research (ONR) Corporate Strategic Communications.

March 16, 2018
By Maryann Lawlor
 DARPA’s Collection and Monitoring via Planning for Active Situational Scenarios (COMPASS) program aims to develop advanced decision-making tools for commanders and other decision makers in complex and dynamic gray-zone conflicts. (Image by DARPA)

The Defense Advanced Projects Research Agency has begun a program to address an emerging conflict in a nebulous area between peace and conventional warfare. Dubbed the “gray zone,” actions in this space occur slower and are executed more subtly using social, psychological, religious, informational, cyber and other means to achieve physical or cognitive objectives with or without violence.

February 14, 2017
By Maryann Lawlor
Tam Le (l) and Todd Noel, computer scientists at Sandia National Laboratories, demonstrate how augmented reality assists in nuclear material protection training.

Sandia National Laboratories scientists have adapted serious gaming technology and methods to enhance nuclear materials physical security training. Using prerelease stand-alone augmented reality headsets, the approach could revolutionize nuclear security engineering training.

January 1, 2017
By Sandra Jontz
Airmen from the New York Air National Guard’s 152nd Air Operations Group participate in Virtual Flag, a computer war game held in February 2015. The computer hookup let war planners interact with other Air Force units around the United States and in Europe.

War gaming across the U.S. Defense Department has been wasting away over the past few years, atrophied because of rapid technological changes and constrained defense spending, department officials say.

March 1, 2016
By Sandra Jontz
A “serious game” developed by Alion Science and Technology puts players inside virtual operating rooms to teach proper communication skills as it guides players through real-world surgery scenarios.

Learning to fight death has become a game—literally. The Office of Naval Research has been funding several gaming initiatives to help improve training and education through simulation and modeling, particularly in the field of medicine.

It is working, says Ray Perez of the office’s Cognitive Science of Learning Program. “[Serious] games motivate players to keep on playing but also give them appropriate practice and give them feedback,” he offers. “That’s the magic sauce.” 

July 11, 2011
By George Seffers

URS Federal Support Services Incorporated, Germantown, Maryland; Calibre Systems Incorporated, Alexandria, Virginia; Booz Allen Hamilton, McLean, Virginia; and Parsons Infrastructure, Washington, D.C., were awarded a more than $24 million contract for the support services to develop, deliver and enable an operationally relevant and totally integrated live, virtual, constructive and gaming training environment. The U.S. Army Mission and Installation Contracting Command, Fort Eustis, Virginia, is the contracting activity.