Intelligence Summit 2015

September 9, 2015
By Robert K. Ackerman
James Clapper, director of national intelligence, leads off a day of discussion at the AFCEA/INSA Intelligence and National Security Summit.

Intelligence and National Security Summit 2015

The SIGNAL Magazine Online Show Daily

Day 1

Quote of the Day:

“I look forward to the day when we talk about winning in the information space.”—Brig. Gen. Michael Groen, USMC, director of intelligence, U.S. Marine Corps

 

The U.S. intelligence community is striving to increase public trust concurrent with improving national security domestically and overseas. While those two tasks might seem complementary, achieving them may require contradictory activities. Looming over these challenges is the greater need for effective cyber operations, both offensive and defensive.

September 10, 2015
By Robert K. Ackerman
David Sanger, chief Washington correspondent for the New York Times, moderates a panel featuring Rep. Devin Nunes (R, CA) and Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA), chairman and ranking member respectively of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence as they open Day 2 of the AFCEA/INSA Intelligence and National Security Summit.

Intelligence and National Security Summit 2015

The SIGNAL Magazine Online Show Daily

Day 2

Quote of the Day:

“It’s time we held government accountable.”—Melissa Hathaway, president of Hathaway Global Strategies

 

The U.S. intelligence community must bring its complementary skills to bear against adversaries that are changing the playing field and the rules of confrontation. These foes range from criminals to terrorists and nation-states, and their goals run the gamut from profit to destruction of the Free World.

November 1, 2015
By Robert K. Ackerman
The six directors of the individual U.S. intelligence agencies outline vital issues at the AFCEA/INSA Intelligence and National Security Summit.

A family of threats ranging from nation-states to individuals acting on behalf of a terrorist group challenges the U.S. intelligence community as it tries to prevent kinetic and digital attacks on the homeland. Traditional arenas such as terrestrial battlespaces have been joined by cyberspace as both targets and media for adversaries bent on damaging or destroying allied military forces or civilian infrastructures.

September 10, 2015
By Robert K. Ackerman

The exponential growth of network connectivity, evidenced by cloud computing and the Internet of Things, has its counterpart in cyberthreats. These new capabilities will provide myriad opportunities for cybermarauders to wreak untold damage for profit or international gain. And, the government is falling further behind as it does not even meet the security criteria it recommends for the commercial sector.

September 10, 2015
By Robert K. Ackerman

The Republicans and Democrats on the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence are divided on party lines over the Iran nuclear arms deal. Even though both parties have access to the same data, they view it through their own prisms and interpret it differently, according to the chairman and ranking member of the committee.

September 9, 2015
By Robert K. Ackerman

Turning the tables on cyber marauders may be alluring as the ultimate cyber defense, but it is not without risk, according to panelists at the AFCEA/INSA Intelligence and National Security Summit being held in Washington, D.C., September 9-10. Commercial cybersecurity measures could reach beyond defense to offensive measures against cyber intruders to a limited degree, but companies must ensure they break no laws—nor rile their cyber adversaries too much.

September 9, 2015
By Robert K. Ackerman

The U.S. intelligence community must commit to greater transparency if it is to regain the public trust that is vital for its continued support, said the director of national intelligence (DNI). James Clapper, opening the AFCEA/INSA Intelligence and National Security Summit being held in Washington, D.C., September 9-10, told the packed audience that the community "must show it is worthy of America’s trust." The U.S. public expects it, he stated.

Not that this approach is without risk, he added. "Our adversaries also have learned a lot from our transparency, but it’s worth the cost,” the DNI emphasized.