Intelligence

April 2008
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
This map of global Internet flow from 2005 shows the high degree of traffic that passes through the United States. This places the country at “ground zero” for Internet traffic, DNI Mike McConnell points out.
The devil you don’t know is the top concern for national security.

October 2007
By Maryann Lawlor

October 2007
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
The system continues to evolve, but its adoption is not universal.

The intelligence community’s one-year-old Intellipedia already is paying benefits to its users, according to Central Intelligence Agency officials. However, a majority of the community remains unfamiliar with its benefits and uncomfortable with its use.

October 2007
By Rita Boland

 
Intelligence experts from nine nations work together in the Coalition Intelligence Fusion Cell in Bahrain. The cell develops intelligence that coalition naval task forces can use to maintain security and stability in the region.
As warfare and problems change, people and procedures adjust as well.

October 2007
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The United Kingdom’s Dabinett program seeks to link all of the nation’s intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition and reconnaissance (ISTAR) platforms, such as this Sentinel airborne stand-off radar aircraft, into a single architecture capable of providing continuous battlefield surveillance.
New structure will manage, control platforms and spread data to services.

September 2007
By Henry S. Kenyon

May 2007
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
A U.S. Air Force intelligence analyst examines reconnaissance imagery from operations in Afghanistan. The surge in data from more varied sources, coupled with the need for collaboration among diverse intelligence organizations, is forcing major changes on intelligence analysis and its practitioners.
A younger work force offers an opportunity for enhanced collaboration.

March 2007
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
A U.S. Air Force F-15E Strike Eagle equipped with targeting pods flies over Southwest Asia. The Air Force will be integrating nontraditional intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) from platforms such as these to a greater extent, but the way to accomplish this effectively is not yet clear.
Consolidation centralizes capability development.

October 2006
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
U.S. warfighters are finding that human intelligence, or HUMINT, is more important than ever in the war on terrorism. The Defense HUMINT Management Office (DHMO) is working to produce new technologies to aid the warfighter in the quest for effective HUMINT collection and dissemination.
Trench coats have given way to optical collectors.

March 2006
By Robert K. Ackerman

The information is at hand; now the community must get its arms around it.

The wealth of information available worldwide from open sources has impelled the U.S. intelligence community to establish a new center dedicated exclusively to exploitation and dissemination of valuable unclassified products. This center will scour the world’s environment of readily available information for snippets of data that could complete a vital intelligence picture as well as for messages among enemies that travel in the open through the global village.

February 2006
By Henry S. Kenyon

October 2005
By Jeff Hawk

 
A George Mason University (GMU) model could help the intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) community gauge which assets are more valuable than others.
Models address the complex problem of assigning global intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance resources.

Two seemingly unrelated events occurred in May.

October 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
One of the ways the U.S. Army gathers and correlates intelligence information is with the All Source Analysis System, which tracks red forces through a variety of ground, airborne and space-based sensors. Officials are working toward standardizing access to these diverse data sources throughout many levels of command.
Stovepipe sensors and databases are enmeshed in the Web.

August 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

February 2001
By Robert K. Ackerman

No longer an independent operation, battlespace awareness is now a part of the fight.

U.S. Air Force intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance is relinquishing its separate identity and becoming an integral part of air combat operations. Sensor advances and the advent of network-centric warfare have both increased the discipline’s importance and compressed the time required to carry out its mission taskings.

February 1999
By Robert K. Ackerman

Smaller, more proficient devices provide sharper signal differentiation for both military and commercial uses.

Highly refined signal filters will open new vistas in applications ranging from complex intelligence gathering to cellular telephony. The advances emerge from high-temperature superconducting materials incorporated into semiconductor chips. Researchers at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency have moved some aspects of this technology to the private sector for production and commercialization.

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