Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

April 9, 2019
Posted by Kimberly Underwood
Industry solutions across manufacturing, materials and mobility applications are wanted for the government’s $5.2 million High Performance Computing Energy Innovation Program. Credit: Shutterstock

The Department of Energy and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are working to advance high performance computing by lowering adoption risks and conducting related technology development. Under the High Performance Computing Energy Innovation Program, known as HPC4EI, they are pursuing three initiatives involving the manufacturing, materials and mobility applications of high performance computing, and are seeking industry solutions as part of a $5.2 million request for proposal solicitation. The laboratory, known as LLNL, is managing the HPC4EI Program in conjunction with other laboratories.

January 10, 2019
By George I. Seffers
A new online wargame will help researchers study data associated with nuclear proliferation. Credit: Razvan Ionut Dragomirescu/Shutterstock

Later this month a team of researchers plans to release an online wargame that will use machine learning and data analytics to study nuclear conflict escalation and the strategic stability of nations in an artificial world.

December 7, 2018
Posted by Julianne Simpson
Researchers injected a magnetorheological (MR) fluid into hollow lattice structures built on LLNL’s Large Area Projection Microstereolithography (LAPµSL) platform, which 3D prints objects with microscale features over wide areas using light and a photosensitive polymer resin. Photo by Julie Mancini/LLNL

Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have developed a new class of metamaterials that can almost instantly respond and stiffen 3D-printed structures when exposed to a magnetic field. The development has huge implications for next-generation helmets, wearable armor and countless other innovations.

These new “field-responsive mechanical metamaterials” (FRMMs) use a vicious, magnetically responsive fluid that is manually injected into the hollow struts and beams of 3D-printed lattices. Unlike other shape-morphing materials, the structure of the FRMMs does not change.

December 11, 2017
 
By using laser-generated, hologram-like 3-D images flashed into photosensitive resin, researchers can build complex parts in a fraction of the time of traditional layer-by-layer printing. Credit: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

By using laser-generated, hologram-like 3D images flashed into photosensitive resin, researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL), along with collaborators at UC Berkeley, the University of Rochester and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), have discovered they can build complex 3-D parts in a fraction of the time of traditional layer-by-layer printing, according to an LLNL press release.

The novel approach is called “volumetric” 3-D printing, and is described in the journal Science Advances, published online on December 8.

October 16, 2017
By Julianne Simpson
Beamlines entering the lower hemisphere of the National Ignition Facility’s target chamber. Lawrence Livermore researchers have successfully combined nine of the facility’s 192 laser beamlines into one directed pulse of light. (Photo: Damien Jemison/LLNL)

For 40 years, the Star Wars Death Star has been one of science fiction’s most iconic figures. But scientists and laser experts held that its superbeam could never work because of the properties of lasers—theory says that the beams would just pass through one another, not converge and combine their energy.

That’s all about to change. A team of researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has added a plasma—a charged mixture of ions and free electrons—to the concept and successfully combined several separate lasers into a superlaser.

February 2, 2017
 
Lawrence Livermore’s High-Repetition-Rate Advanced Petawatt Laser System recently demonstrated continuous operation of an all-diode-pumped, high-energy femtosecond petawatt laser system.

The High-Repetition-Rate Advanced Petawatt Laser System (HAPLS) being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory recently completed a significant milestone: demonstration of continuous operation of an all-diode-pumped, high-energy femtosecond petawatt laser system. The system now is ready for delivery and integration at the European Extreme Light Infrastructure Beamlines (ELI Beamlines) facility project in the Czech Republic, where it will be used for conducting experiments.  

July 19, 2016
 
Researchers have created a 3-D printed lattice that offers both strength and flexibility and may benefit the defense and aerospace industries.

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) engineers have achieved unprecedented scalability in 3-D printed architectures of arbitrary geometry, opening the door to super-strong, ultra-lightweight and flexible metallic materials for aerospace, the military and the automotive industry, according to a published announcement.

June 1, 2016
By George I. Seffers
Batteries may be essential to the modern world, but recent breakthroughs in supercapacitor research achieved by government and university scientists could signal the end for batteries.

The common battery may not keep going and going and going after all. A recent scientific advance—the first successfully 3-D printed supercapacitors using an ultralightweight graphene aerogel—could lead to the end of the ubiquitous power source. The breakthrough also could allow greater flexibility in the design of electronics and provide the juice for high-powered military systems. 

April 28, 2016
 
The Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array (LLMDA) will be on board the International Space Station. Image courtesy of NASA.

A biological detection system developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists will soon take a giant leap into outer space, lab officials announced.

March 29, 2016
 

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, California, today announced it will receive a first-of-a-kind brain-inspired supercomputing platform for deep learning developed by IBM Research. Based on a breakthrough neurosynaptic computer chip called IBM TrueNorth, the scalable platform will process the equivalent of 16 million neurons and 4 billion synapses and consume only 2.5 watts of power—the energy equivalent of a hearing aid battery.

February 17, 2016
George I. Seffers

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has announced the first 10 projects under the U.S. Energy Department’s High Performance Computing for Manufacturing (HPC4Mfg) Program. In the coming weeks, the department will solicit the next round of proposals for qualified industry partners to compete for new funding this year.

September 16, 2015
By George I. Seffers
The Lawrence Livermore-Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute agreement to promote supercomputing supports President Barack Obama's plan to spur the economy.

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute will combine decades of expertise to help American industry and businesses expand use of high performance computing (HPC) to help fuel the economy.

Livermore and Rensselaer look to bridge the gap between the levels of computing conducted at their institutions and the typical levels found in industry. Scientific and engineering software applications capable of running on HPC platforms are a prime area of interest.

August 19, 2015
 

Under an 18-month Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories will use state-of-the-art software for generative design from San Rafael-based Autodesk Inc. as it studies how new material microstructures, arranged in complex configurations and printed with additive manufacturing techniques, will produce objects with physical properties that were never before possible. LLNL researchers will bring to bear several key technologies, such as additive manufacturing, material modeling and architected design (arranging materials at the micro and nanoscale through computational design).

May 19, 2015
 

Patricia Falcone has been selected as deputy director for science and technology at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California.

November 17, 2014
 

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, California, recently announced a contract with IBM to deliver a next-generation supercomputer in 2017. The system, to be called Sierra, will serve the National Nuclear Security Administration’s Advanced Simulation and Computing program. Procurement of Sierra is part of the U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored Collaboration of Oak Ridge, Argonne and Lawrence Livermore (CORAL) national labs to accelerate the development of high-performance computing. CORAL will result in delivery to each laboratory of a supercomputer expected to provide about five times the performance of today’s top systems.

May 8, 2014
 

William H. Goldstein has been named director of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California.