malware

April 20, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
Leaders from the Defense Information Systems Agency and the Joint Force Headquarters Department of Defense Information Network, including Gen. Garret Yee, Gen. Paul Fredenburg and Joe Wassel, found that the close working relationship of the two organizations was crucial in responding to the SolarWinds malware attack.

Facing an unprecedented malicious cyber event, the Defense Information Systems Agency, known as DISA, and the Joint Force Headquarters Department of Defense Information Network, or JFHQ-DODIN, sprang into action, leaning on their respective round-the-clock operations, their supply chain management postures, and relying on its industry, Defense Department and government partnerships, leaders say.

March 23, 2021
 

With ransomware and malware attacks on the rise across the globe, leaders need to be positioned for incident response before a breach occurs. Most businesses are not prepared for the earth-splitting impact a ransomware attack will present to their organization. Many organizations are deploying the “HOPE” strategy against ransomware. They hope every day that they aren’t targeted, because they know a ransomware attack will present a monumental financial and organizational challenge. Commercial businesses have paid hundreds of millions of dollars to black hat hackers for the rights to the decryption key to restore their network. Ransomware can shut down computers and lock out users until they pay hackers a ransom.

April 8, 2020
Posted by Julianne Simpson
Credit: angellodeco/Shutterstock

A joint advisory published today by the U.K.’s National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) and U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) shows that a growing number of cyber criminals are exploiting the COVID-19 outbreak for their own personal gain.

September 20, 2017
By Kimberly Underwood
The winning computer in the DOD’s 2016 Cyber Grand Challenge, "Innovations in Defense: Artificial Intelligence and the Challenge of Cybersecurity,” highlights the department’s advanced cybersecurity abilities as a federal agency. A recent survey from SolarWinds found that DOD agencies are more prepared for cyber attacks as compared to civilian agencies. 

More and more, U.S. federal agencies are seeing inappropriate Internet access breaches, rogue devices and denial of service attacks. A key reason why: federal agencies are hindered by budget constraints that prevent information technology (IT) improvements. Agencies also have to juggle competing priorities, complex internal environments and poor top-level decision-making when it comes to cyber management, asserts a recent study from Herndon, Virginia-based SolarWinds Worldwide. The company conducted a survey of 200 federal government IT professionals in July to assess their cybersecurity challenges during the past 12 months.

August 2, 2017
 
The DHS Science & Technology Directorate has announced the transition of a new malware analysis tool to the commercial marketplace.

REnigma, a program designed to analyze malicious software, has spun off from the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory to create startup Deterministic Security LLC. The Oregon-based company was founded to further mature the technology into a commercially available product and work with early adopters, focusing on incident response for government organizations and large enterprises.

May 6, 2016
By Sandra Jontz
Intelligence and cybersecurity experts discuss emerging cyber threats at an AFCEA EPIC presentation, with growing concern over wearables and the Internet of Things.

Should private companies be able to—and maybe more importantly—hack back? 

The question drew enthusiastic responses from panelists and the audience during at presentation Thursday by AFCEA’s Emerging Professionals in Intelligence Committee (EPIC) on intelligence and cybersecurity.  

February 22, 2016
By Sandra Jontz

Last year proved lucrative for cyber criminals, and 2016 is shaping up to be even better, with a seemingly unsuspecting victim in the hacking crosshairs: driverless cars, according to Dell Security. In 2015, hackers carried out a massive number of breaches against organizations and government agencies in spite of the millions of dollars spent not only to safeguard networks, but also to hire security experts and train employees on proper cyber hygiene, according to the company’s annual cybersecurity report released Monday.

December 2, 2015
By Sandra Jontz

If you thought 2015 was a grueling cybersecurity year, hang on.

“It’s the nightmare waiting to be dreamt,” Bob Hansmann, director of security analysis and strategy for Raytheon-Websense Security Labs says of the next 12 months.

Let’s begin with the 2016 presidential race, which experts predict will launch a slew of new lures and malware intent on defrauding, deceiving and debunking contributors and the candidates and their campaign coffers.

“Candidates and others, even news agencies covering [the race], may be involved as victims targeted by organizations like the Syrian Electronic Army or hacktivists or anyone else with a counter political agenda,” Hansmann warns.

September 2, 2015
By Sandra Jontz

Ransomware soared as the preferred malware of cybercriminals, with the number of new samples rising 58 percent over the second quarter of this year, and a whopping 127 percent over this time last year, according to a new analysis by Intel Security.

The firm released a retrospective report five years after acquiring McAfee. Its researchers compared what they thought would happen beginning in 2010 to what actually happened with hardware and software security threats, noting the boom in the number of devices connected to the Internet and a general lack of cyberhygiene contributed to the increase of malware intrusions and ransomware attacks.