March 2002

March 2002
By Lt. Col. Ilkka J. Korkiamaki, FDF

Emergency services communications approach presents alternative for military operations.

A globally adopted standard and technology developed for public safety organizations could support multinational military operations by providing international interoperability. The high-level commercial technology product offers various data applications that meet the communications needs of international peace support operations.

March 2002
By Henry S. Kenyon

Tiny heat pumps offer rapid cooling for electronics, fiber optics.

Researchers have developed highly efficient thermal transfer devices that can cool or heat an area thousands of times faster than existing methods. An alloy-based substance can be deposited in microscopic layers on hot spots in electronics or next-generation fiber optic switches to improve their efficiency. The technology also makes possible the creation of tiny, localized heat sources for use in biochemistry, laboratory-on-a-chip systems, and mobile power sources for soldiers.

March 2002
By Sharon Berry

Organizations unite to provide one-time sign-on, greater control over proprietary data for customers.

March 2002
By Henry S. Kenyon

Polish research center aims to boost national technology industry, open new markets.

A cooperative venture among government, academic and commercial organizations is seeking to build an advanced research park in the heart of Poland. The Warsaw-based entity will serve as an incubator for small companies, provide established firms with access to research facilities and create a venue to turn the fruits of this labor into commercial products.

March 2002
By Maryann Lawlor

Technique provides 64-fold increase in radar sensor utility.

The potential of network-centric operations is growing with the capability to link, interpret, process, manage and share data from multiple sensors in near real time and throughout a battlespace. This information could be delivered directly to a commander’s laptop computer to provide a clearer and more complete picture of detected threats.

March 2002
By Henry S. Kenyon

Government seeks novel methods to squeeze the most from crowded radio frequency environment.

Future military communications equipment may one day be able to detect and use locally available radio spectrum automatically. U.S. Defense Department researchers are developing methods that allow systems to scan for unassigned frequency bands autonomously. These technologies will allow warfighters to deploy quickly anywhere in the world without time-consuming spectrum management and allocation concerns.

March 2002
By Henry S. Kenyon

Airborne facility offers flexibility, interoperability, increased operational tempo.

The U.S. Army has developed an airborne tactical command post that enhances company-level units’ situational awareness with real-time voice and data connectivity. Mounted inside a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter, the center features an integrated command and control system hosting an extensive communications suite and five fully automated workstations linked to a central computer that can operate a variety of battlefield software.

March 2002
By Maryann Lawlor

Warfighter benefits from e-procurement practices.

The U.S. Defense Department is reviewing several organizational, role and mission options that will emphasize e-business and accelerate the transformation of the department’s business processes. A change in leadership within the department as well as President Bush’s Management Agenda, an effort led by the Office of Management and Budget, are two of the driving forces behind the changes.

March 2002
By Linda Polonsky-Hillmer

Paperless environment streamlines processes, saves time.

After participating in one of the first multinational exercises to use the U.S. Defense Department’s new electronic procurement system, U.S. Army officials are touting the benefits of using paperless contracting in a contingency operation. The technology allowed procurement personnel to save time, respond quickly to customers’ needs and work efficiently with contractors from several countries.

March 2002
By Vice Adm. Herbert A. Browne, USN (Ret.)

The recent success of network-centric warriors in operation Enduring Freedom has shined the spotlight on information operations. News reports are flush with stories of how allied forces employed information for precise real-time targeting of enemy assets. The results of these operations stand in testimony to their effectiveness: a brutal totalitarian dictatorship overthrown and its terrorist cohorts routed from their places of sanctuary.

March 2002
By Robert K. Ackerman

Significant bandwidth demands accompany breakthrough capabilities.

Satellite communications, Web services and imagery have come of age in the battlespace of operation Enduring Freedom. This first network-centric war has revealed an explosion in capabilities that has been matched by information demands at all levels of command.

March 2002
By Robert K. Ackerman

Information operations involve more than just digits.

The menu for U.S. Army information operations now runs several courses long as the service integrates low-end news activities directed at local populace with high-end cyberspace defense and attack. As all of these elements come together in a common operational mode, the future cyberwarrior may see netwar visualization capabilities that provide cyberspace situational awareness akin to icon-driven battlefield monitoring systems.