mobile communications

January 25, 2019
By Chris Balcik
A soldier fires an M240B machine gun during combined arms live-fire training. Soldiers in combat face a great deal of emotional and physical stress, but wearable technologies can monitor their health and performance. Photo by Army Spc. Hannah Tarkelly

The military continues to focus its efforts on developing the most sophisticated technologies and capabilities needed to sustain tactical advantage and achieve mission objectives. But the most critical component to success on the battlefield continues to lie with the warfighter.

January 9, 2019
Posted by George I. Seffers
IARPA has issued two requests for information, one for classified deep learning and machine learning research and another for novel cooling solutions for portable devices. Credit: geralt/Pixabay

The Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) is seeking information on research efforts in the area of machine learning with a particular focus on deep learning and in the area of cooling systems for small mobile devices.

June 29, 2018
 
Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin have created a nerve gas detector using a smartphone, a box made of Legos and a chemical sensor. Credit: University of Texas at Austin

Researchers at the University of Texas, Austin, have designed a way to sense dangerous chemicals by rigging up a smartphone, a sensor and a box made from Lego bricks, the university has announced. The device could help first responders and scientists in the field identify deadly and difficult-to-detect nerve agents such as VX and sarin.

July 18, 2016
 

The Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology (S&T) Directorate will host two industry days to provide additional insights to the mobile and cellular industry and researchers about the Mobile Threats and Defenses request for information (RFI).

May 22, 2013
George I. Seffers

Integration Technologies Group Inc., Falls Church, Va., is being awarded a $20,279,774 firm-fixed-price delivery order under previously awarded contract to provide ONE-NET PC refresh hardware to various locations outside the continental U.S. locations. The government will receive the first order for desktops, notebooks or tablets for testing, inspection and approval. On government acceptance of the first unit, the contractor will deliver additional units ordered to locations specified. This two-year delivery order includes one, two-year option which, if exercised, would bring the cumulative, not-to-exceed value of this delivery order to an estimated $40,559,548.

November 18, 2011
By Beverly Schaeffer

It's said that necessity is the mother of invention-but experience can serve as the catalyst for action. In this issue of SIGNAL Magazine, Michael A. Robinson's article, "Putting Satellites in Soldiers' Hands," examines how a retired U.S. Army Signal Corps officer has parlayed his experience into developing more effective satellite apps for mobile devices. Jim Ramsey is that retired officer, and now he's president of MTN Government Services (MTNGS).

August 10, 2011
 

The U.S. Army has linked military radios and chat systems with cell phones, instant messaging and other commercial products that can facilitate communications among the U.S. military and NATO allies. Using Lync 2010, a Microsoft collaboration product, the capability will enable warfighters in command posts or on patrol to know who is online and the best way to reach them-either by computer, radio, chat or phone.