modernization

July 31, 2019
 

McLean, Virginia-based Capgemini announced on July 31 that it would be supporting the government’s information technology (IT) modernization efforts. The General Services Administration (GSA) awarded the company a contract under a new multiple-award blanket purchase agreement (BPA), the Centers of Excellence Discovery and Assessment BPA for Cloud Adoption and IT Infrastructure Optimization.

July 17, 2019
Posted by Kimberly Underwood
Dana Deasy, the Defense Department’s CIO, pictured speaking at AFCEA’s 2018 Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium in Baltimore, is stressing the role of cloud and artificial intelligence as part of DOD’s new Digital Modernization Strategy. Credit: Michael Carpenter

On Friday, the Defense Department released its DOD Digital Modernization Strategy, aiming to greatly improve the military’s digital environment. The strategy aims to modernize the DOD’s joint information enterprise environment by advancing its fixed and mobile networking capabilities,; DOD-wide enterprise information technology (IT) services, coordinated technology refresh efforts, joint cybersecurity capability and access to data.

July 11, 2019
 

El Segundo, California-based Raytheon announced on July 11 that The Boeing Company chose it to be the radar supplier for the B-52 bomber radar modernization program. 

Under the contract, Raytheon will design, develop, produce and sustain active electronically scanned array radar systems for the entire U.S. Air Force B-52 fleet, Raytheon stated. Raytheon's B-52 radar is based on active electronically scanned array (AESA) systems developed from the APG-79/APG-82 radar system. The new systems will improve the navigation reliability of nuclear and conventional missions. It also offers improved mapping and detection ranges, and an increase in the number of targets that can simultaneously be engaged.

February 6, 2019
By George I. Seffers
Industry and military officials see both silver linings and gray skies in the Pentagon's cloud computing strategy. Credit: Ivan Cholakov and jannoon0281/Shutterstock, edited by Chris D'Elia

The cloud strategy document released this week by the U.S. Defense Department is drawing mixed reactions from industry and military officials. Experts welcome the strategy as an important step toward modernizing the department’s infrastructure but also express some concerns and note that many questions remain.

August 22, 2018
By George I. Seffers
Lt. Gen. Bruce Crawford, USA, Army chief information officer, addresses the TechNet Augusta confrence. Photo by Michael Carpenter

The U.S. Army may establish an artificial intelligence task force over the next 90 days in an effort to help develop needed expertise and better prepare for the service for the future of warfare, says Lt. Gen. Bruce Crawford, USA, Army chief information officer. The service also is creating a cloud computing advisory board.

August 1, 2018
By Kimberly Underwood
Maj. Gen. Randy Taylor, USA, commanding general, U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Command, and senior commander of Aberdeen Proving Ground, is working to improve the Army’s readiness.

To ensure greater supply availability of certain technologies, the U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Command is pursuing a concept not widely used in the military, reports Maj. Gen. Randy Taylor, USA, commander of the organization and senior commander of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The command has started a pilot program that will allow the service to option intellectual property rights in specific hardware and software contracts, Gen. Taylor says.

August 1, 2018
By Robert K. Ackerman
U.S. soldiers conduct a communications check during an exercise. The Army is implementing a plan for restructuring its battlespace network after years of ad hoc changes in Southwest Asia. Army photography by Lt. Col. John Hall, USA.

The U.S. Army will be ditching some programs, re-engineering others and seeking innovative technologies to fill networking requirements created by a new operational reality, say the service’s information technology experts. Having a deliberate period of acquisition now, the service is able to incorporate flexibility and innovation into its plans to meet new requirements.

August 1, 2018
By George I. Seffers
Army combat units on the move need different networking capabilities from support units that set up camp and stay awhile. Service officials intend to develop a modernized network capable of being scaled and adapted depending on the operational situation. Credit: Spc. Hubert D. Delany III, USA

The U.S. Army’s major overhaul of its network may lead to a communications structure capable of conforming to an array of operational situations, including the possibility of providing offensive cyber and electronic warfare capabilities.

July 17, 2018
By Kimberly Underwood
From left, Army Undersecretary Ryan D. McCarthy, Army Secretary Mark Esper, Army Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Milley and Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville hold a briefing about the Army’s new Futures Command on July 13 at the Pentagon.

The U.S. Army took another step toward developing its fourth command when it announced that Austin, Texas, would be the location of the new Futures Command.

The service is pursuing the new command as a way to modernize and position itself “to achieve clear overmatch in future conflicts,” according to the Army. Having a central location for its modernization will unify its efforts, Army leaders said.

“The creation of the Army’s Futures Command constitutes the Army’s most significant reorganization effort since 1973,” said Army Secretary Mark Esper. “It is a new organization that epitomizes our commitment to bold reform and transforming the Army’s modernization process.”

June 15, 2018
By Kimberly Underwood
In April, various corps headquarters command and staff from several Army bases participated in the Multinational Warfighting Exercise (WFX) 18-4, taking a closer look the service’s tactical network and mission command capabilities, according to the PEO C3T.

Taking the network into battle can be challenging for Army soldiers operating on the tactical edge. The Army’s Command Post Computing Environment, known as CP CE, is an integrated mission command system that supports warfighters across intelligence, fires, logistics, maneuvers and airspace management capabilities. The need for this system to include open system architecture and be interoperable, cost effective and cyber secure are key goals of the Product Manager Mission Command (PM MC) of the Program Executive Office Command, Control, Communications-Tactical (PEO C3T).

June 13, 2018
By George I. Seffers
U.S. Army officials intend to modernize the service’s network, which is considered too complex and cumbersome. As part of that effort, the service could potentially kick off a competition for industry and academia to offer cutting-edge solutions. Photo Credit: David Vergun

Two U.S. Army generals intimately involved in the modernization of the service’s network are considering a competition for industry and academia to come up with cutting-edge solutions, such as artificial intelligence, for the future network.

In an example of great minds thinking alike, Maj. Gen. Peter Gallagher, USA, who leads the network modernization cross-functional team (CFT), and Maj. Gen. David Bassett, USA, the program executive officer for command, control and communications-tactical (PEO C3T), recently realized during an interview with SIGNAL Magazine that both were thinking along the same lines.

April 4, 2018
By Maryann Lawlor
Audience members engage at the AFCEA Mission Command Industry Engagement Symposium roundtable.

The U.S. Army is making some long-needed changes to the way it’s configuring the networks required to prepare for, conduct and win wars. With the promise of increased resources, the service plans to do more than just upgrade its information technology. Instead, it has designed a strategy that incorporates the successes of the past, adjusts where needed in the present and sets the stage for a future that takes advantage of innovative solutions.

March 6, 2018
By George I. Seffers
Lt. Gen. Bruce Crawford, Army chief information officer (CIO)/G-6, takes questions at the AFCEA Signal Conference.

Lt. Gen. Bruce Crawford, Army chief information officer (CIO)/G-6, said the service is interested in small satellite technology, dynamic spectrum access, the ability to leverage existing infrastructure, alternatives to space-based precision, navigation and timing, artificial intelligence, machine learning, and air and ground robotics.

Gen. Crawford specified that the technologies are not capabilities gaps but instead are technological areas of interest. He made the comments while presenting a keynote speech at the AFCEA Army Signal Conference in Springfield, Virginia.

February 28, 2018
 

The U.S. Army has awarded a five-year, $81.5 million contract to Herndon, Virginia-based LGS Innovations. Under the contract, LGS will support the Army's Program Executive Officer Enterprise Information Systems (PEO EIS) Power Projection Enablers (P2E) team at Fort Belvoir, Virginia. LGS will assist the P2E in data network modernization as part of the Pacific Data Project. The data project seeks to create a single, secure standards-based network across 100 sites in the Asia Pacific Theater. Also, the effort will reduce the number of entry and exit points to enhance network security.

January 10, 2018
 
The U.S. Army has kicked off a new effort to modernize expeditionary command posts. Credit: U.S. Army

The U.S. Army intends to improve expeditionary command-post capabilities by providing mobile, scalable and survivable platforms, the service announced. The Army recently authorized the implementation of the Command Post Integrated Infrastructure, or CPI2, effort in December to address mobility issues and to ensure communications hardware and mission-command application integration across platforms.

The Army has established several technological goals, which include:

• Leveraging secure wireless technology for rapid connectivity.

• Improving mobility.

November 8, 2016
By Joe Kim

More than a decade ago—2003 to be precise—the Defense Department announced plans to convert its network to the Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) standard. Today, the wait continues.

August 16, 2016
By Sandra Jontz
A Louisiana Army National Guard chief communications plans officer trains members of the Cyber Defense Incident Response Team to defend the state’s cyber assets in November 2015. Photo courtesy DOD

Information technology modernization has reached a precipice within the federal government as agencies struggle to manage many moving parts and jockey for the same pot of money and talent. Add to the fray the results of a new survey showing an alarming reliance by federal agencies on outdated information technology systems.