NATO

January 1, 2021
By Lt. Col. (G.S.) Stefan Eisinger
Military and civilian personnel work hand in hand to tackle challenges in cyberspace. Credit: Bundeswehr

Germany, the United States and many other nations are facing a more diverse, complex, quickly evolving and demanding security environment than at any time since the end of the Cold War. The resulting challenges to national and international security and stability could be as harmful to societies, economies and institutions as conventional attacks.

December 1, 2020
By Kimberly Underwood
A U.S. Marine with Marine Rotational Force-Europe 20.2, Marine Forces Europe and Africa, and Norwegian soldiers pause for surveillance during Exercise Thunder Reindeer in Setermoen, Norway, in May 2020.  USMC photo by Lance Cpl. Chase W. Drayer

Given adversarial threats in the Indo-Pacific region and Europe, especially from Russia and China, the Arctic region’s strategic importance is increasing. As such, over the last several years, the U.S. military has focused on growing its cold weather operation capabilities. Beginning in 2016, the U.S. Marine Corps in particular, through host and NATO ally Norway, has maintained a presence in the Kingdom of Norway to train and develop the skills necessary to operate in extreme conditions.

December 1, 2020
By Kimberly Underwood
U.S. Marines participating in the Thunder Reindeer exercise in Setermoen, Norway in late May practice their cold weather survival skills while living in the Arctic. Credit: USMC photo by Lance Cpl. Chase Drayer

Even in the summer, Norway offers challenging, rugged terrain that helps hone the cold-weather survival and mountain warfare skills of the U.S. Marines. In May, Marines and sailors with 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force, along with the Marine Forces Europe and Africa, deployed to northern Norway above the Arctic Circle as part of Marine Rotational Force-Europe (MRF-E) 20.2. The warfighters worked directly with the Norwegian Army to advance their skills and improve allied interoperability, says Lt. Col. Brian Donlon, USMC, commander of 3rd Battalion, who leads the MRF-E contingent.

November 1, 2020
By Robert K. Ackerman
An aurora borealis appears in the night sky over the USS Thomas Hudner during an exercise in the Arctic. U.S. and allied forces are paying greater attention to operations in the Arctic and the North Atlantic in the face of an increased Russian threat.  U.S. Navy photo

The U.S. Navy is adapting its Atlantic forces to interoperate better with those of its NATO allies while also incorporating navies from non-alliance countries. This approach includes incorporating a more expeditionary nature into U.S. forces while also extending the areas NATO and non-NATO forces operate to confront a growing multidomain threat from Russia. Traditional North Atlantic naval activities now extend into the Arctic Ocean, where changing conditions have opened up new threat windows.

October 23, 2020
By Maryann Lawlor
U.S. Marines assigned to 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing offload equipment from the aviation logistic ship S.S. Wright during Exercise Trident Juncture 18 at Orkanger Port, Norway. The exercise enhances the U.S. and NATO Allies’ and partners’ abilities to work together collectively to conduct military operations under challenging conditions. Credit: U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Cody J. Ohira

Ensuring the mobility of troops and support equipment in the European theater will depend on coordinated command and control. In anticipation of crises actions and needs, improvements are needed during the upfront coordination as well as to the last mile of transportation capabilities that are insufficient to meet the military’s equipment transportation needs.

October 20, 2020
By Kimberly Underwood
The Bulgarian Chief of Defense, Adm. Emil Eftimov (l) visits Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe (SHAPE) in Mons, Belgium in August, meeting with Supreme Allied Commander Europe (SACEUR) General Tod Wolters (second from l) and his staff. To aid the decision making of SACEUR leaders, advanced geospatial information system technologies are needed. Credit: NATO Photo by SMSgt Frederic Rosaire (FRA)

The strategic importance of NATO’s military forces in Europe remains high, especially in the rear area of Europe, as NATO works to strengthen the alliance and improve deterrence measures against adversaries, including Russia. Because deterrence relies on situational awareness, data and information that feed a clear operational picture are critical components, say Leendert Van Bochoven, global lead for National Security and NATO, IBM, in The Netherlands; and René Kleint, director, Business Development Logistics & Medical Service, Elektroniksystem-und Logistik (ESG) GmbH, in Germany.

October 16, 2020
By Robert K. Ackerman
Credit: Shutterstock/Aleksandar Malivuk

In addition to institutions such as NATO and the European Union (EU), one of the biggest players in North Atlantic defense is data, say European experts. Yet, nations often overlook the lessons generated by the private sector and not always pursuing effective investments in military information technology.

Those points were discussed at the AFCEA Europe Joint Support and Enabling Command (JSEC) virtual event in late September. Maj. Gen. Erich Staudacher, GEAF (Ret.), AFCEA Europe general manager, offered that data increasingly sprawls into military mobility. He recited an old Latin saying that navigation is necessary, all the more in this sea of data.

October 14, 2020
By Maryann Lawlor
2nd Lt. Shane Neal, USA, receives guidance from Capt. Douglas Gain, USA, as they review the Cyber and Electromagnetic Activities Team’s plans during Exercise Saber Junction 2019 at the Grafenwoehr Training Area, Germany. Credit: U.S. Army

A large number of national NATO contract competitions for resources could instigate bidding wars, causing delays during critical troop movements and confusion in the rear echelons. According to one leader of forces in Europe, adversaries may find it difficult to resist this opportunity to take advantage of the conditions to aggravate the situation by distributing disinformation and launching cyber attacks on commercial carriers. Consequently, during these critical early phases of military force mobilization, shared sensitive information and key infrastructure will need to be secured and defended.

October 9, 2020
By Robert K. Ackerman
A U.S. Army soldier shouts orders as his unit prepares to assault an objective during exercise Saber Junction in Germany this year. NATO faces its own organizational challenges as it strives to increase the resiliency and effectiveness of its logistics in the face of a newly emerging threat picture. Credit: NATO

New challenges facing the West have compelled NATO to refresh domestic capabilities that have long been overlooked, alliance leaders say. These capabilities focus largely on logistics, but they also encompass new areas of concern such as cybersecurity and the supply chain.

September 3, 2020
By Shaun Waterman
Photo credit: Pixabay

The global economy—and especially more technologically advanced countries like the United States—are increasingly dependent on space-based capabilities like GPS and satellite communications.

“When considering our daily lives,” explained retired Canadian Gen. Robert Mazzolin, now chief cybersecurity strategist for the Rhea Group, a global engineering firm. “There’s not an operation or activity that’s conducted anywhere at any level that’s not somehow dependent on space capabilities,” he went on.

September 9, 2020
By Shaun Waterman
A GPS III satellite circles the earth. Photo Credit: United States Government, GPS.Gov

​​On both sides of the Atlantic, NATO and European leaders are struggling to address the threat posed to vital space systems by foreign hackers, cyber warfare and online espionage. Huge swathes of the global economy are utterly dependent on orbital capabilities like GPS that look increasingly fragile as space becomes more crowded and contested.

June 5, 2020
Posted by Kimberly Underwood
A F-15E Strike Eagle from the 492nd Fighter Squadron takes off from Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England on May 27 during a large force exercise. The U.S. Air Forces in Europe and Africa and airmen from the 48th Fighter Wing conducted the dissimilar air combat training to advance combat readiness and increase tactical proficiency to help strengthen the NATO alliance. Credit: U.S. Air Force photo by Air Force Senior Airman Christopher Sparks

The Air Force recently hosted a large exercise in the United Kingdom’s North Sea airspace, the Defense Department reported on June 5. The service’s 48th Fighter Wing held the exercise to continue the advanced training of U.S. Air Forces in Europe and Africa and NATO partners given the persistent and growing near-peer threats in the region. 

May 20, 2020
By Julianne Simpson
Credit: Shutterstock/deepadesigns

The implications of 5G for the U.S. Defense Department are profound. Among the plethora of capabilities it will provide—enabling the Internet of Things, low latency, higher bandwidth—5G could be used to run a multilevel secure coalition communications system.

May 20, 2020
By Kimberly Underwood
The Army tests an integrated mounted reconnaissance capability on a manned Stryker and an unmanned ground system called the Squad Maneuver Equipment Transport during the Joint Warfighter Assessment (JWA) 2019 in December. The Army is preparing Joint All-Domain Command and Control, or JADC2, capabilities to test at the next JWA in 2021. Credit: U.S. Army photo by Jack Bunja.

With the U.S. Defense Department’s pursuit of Joint all-domain operations and the integrated command and control technologies needed to support activities across sea, land, air, space and cyberspace, the Army is looking at how to move beyond its first year of experimentation. The service is working to put in place a more sustainable approach to assessing and experimenting with Joint All-Domain Command and Control, or JADC2, capabilities, to support large-scale combat operations through each warfighting domain.

May 12, 2020
 

The Boeing Co., St. Louis, Missouri, has been awarded a $25,439,155 firm-fixed-price delivery order to contract FA8621-15-D-6266 to provide C-17 training devices and spares for the NATO Airlift Management Program located at Papa Air Base, Hungary. The training system will consist of one C-17 Weapon System Trainer (composed of an air vehicle station with an instructor operator station (IOS) and a loadmaster station with an IOS, a learning center complete with computer-based training systems, core integrated processor task trainer, courseware and initial spares to support these items for two years. Work will be performed at Papa AB, Hungary, and is expected to be completed June 1, 2022. This award is a sole-source acquisition.

May 12, 2020
 

Jacksonville-based Crowley Solutions was awarded a multi-year contract by the U.S. Army 409th Contracting Support Brigade-Theater Contracting Command. Under the Third Party Logistics Europe Wide Movement contract, the company will provide transportation of personnel and cargo and procurement of material handling equipment to the U.S. government, NATO and non-NATO partners throughout the European Command area of responsibility, supporting the 21st Theater Sustainment Command and Theater Movements Center, headquartered in Kaiserslautern, Germany. The contract runs from May 2020 until May 2023, with an estimated value of $49 million, and is on a task-order basis.

May 5, 2020
By Robert K. Ackerman
Credit: Shutterstock/Titima Ongkantong

An ad hoc group of international defense and national security experts are brainstorming the future in a two-day online symposium analyzed by tools from the world’s most well-known artificial intelligence (AI) computer. Titled “Securing the Post-COVID Future,” the event is exchanging ideas from among active duty military and civilian expertise. Findings during the 50-hour nonstop event are being evaluated by tools from the Watson platform, IBM’s question-answering computer that bested Jeopardy!’s top two champions in a competition a few years ago.

May 1, 2020
By Robert K. Ackerman
Members of the NATO Military Committee are briefed at the NATO Joint Warfare Centre in Norway. The Atlantic alliance is broadening its activities in cybersecurity amid more diverse threats and growing new technologies. Credit: NATO

NATO is doubling down on cyberspace defense with increased partnerships and new technology thrusts. Information exchanges on threats and solutions, coupled with research into exotic capabilities such as artificial intelligence, are part of alliance efforts to secure its own networks and aid allies in the cybersecurity fight.

The threats the alliance networks face constitute relatively the same ones confronting other organizations. NATO faces the double challenge of securing its own networks and information assets, as well as helping its member nations improve their own national cyber resilience.

May 1, 2020
By Kimberly Underwood
An Army Bradley fighting vehicle armored personnel carrier waits to board a vessel at the port of Bremerhaven, Germany, last October, while supporting Atlantic Resolve, a mission demonstrating continued U.S. support for NATO allies in Europe. The Joint Support and Enabling Command (JSEC) will follow the lead of the Supreme Allied Commander Europe, or SACEUR, in providing deployment assistance in Europe to the U.S. and other NATO militaries.  U.S. Army Sgt. Thomas Mort

NATO is evolving to adapt to present-day threats, and part of that strengthening means improving the deployment of forces to the European continent from allied nations. The organization’s new Joint Support and Enabling Command, known as JSEC, is taking on that role. The new command is in the process of building itself up, defining doctrine, forging relationships, and developing the necessary personnel and information technology infrastructure to support its operations. 

April 1, 2020
 

Dumfries, Virginia-based ALEX - Alternative Experts, LLC announced on April 1 that is was awarded a Joint Non-lethal Weapons Directorate contract. Under the measure, the company will support the Joint Non-lethal Weapons Directorate by providing subject matter experts to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and to eight U.S. Combatant Commands across the globe, related to human effects scientific support and range coordination.

 

 

 

January 14, 2020
 

Brig. Gen. Matthew J. Van Wagenen, USA, has been assigned as deputy chief of staff for operations, Allied Rapid Reaction Corps, NATO, United Kingdom.

November 12, 2019
By Kimberly Underwood
Vice Adm. Andrew Lewis, USN, commander, U.S. Second Fleet (c), speaks to USS Gerald R. Ford's (CVN 78) wardroom during a visit to the Navy's newest aircraft carrier. Adm. Lewis spoke at MILCOM 2019. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Sean Elliott

The United States and NATO are facing greater threats from the Russian Federation, and a growing interest from China, in the waters of the North Atlantic and the Arctic, warned Vice Adm. Andrew “Woody” Lewis, USN, who spoke Tuesday at AFCEA International and IEEE’s MILCOM conference in Norfolk, Virginia.

The dual-hatted commander oversees both the U.S. Navy’s Second Fleet and NATO’s new Joint Force Command Norfolk. To combat rising threats and provide stability, both commands must improve their operational abilities in these northern waters, he said.

October 1, 2019
By Robert K. Ackerman
NATO members participating in the 2019 Coalition Warrior Interoperability Exercise test communication equipment to ensure partner communications can interoperate during combined operations. Allied Command Transformation (ACT) is working to speed innovation into NATO forces to help improve interoperability along with seizing key military advantages.  Supreme Allied Commander Transformation photo

NATO is accelerating its efforts to input innovation into its operational capabilities. This effort is aided both by industry and academia and by different nations that bring new technology applications to the alliance table. But even the best ideas are encountering speed bumps, and adversaries are moving quickly to exploit their own technological advances.

October 1, 2019
By Kimberly Underwood

NATO’s Science and Technology Organization took notice of the military potential of same-frequency simultaneous transmission and reception, or SF-STAR, capability employed with full-duplex radio technology, and in 2017 formed an exploratory team to examine the potential use in tactical communications and electronic warfare.

September 10, 2019
 

Carlsbad, California-based Viasat upgraded the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's (NATO) ultra high frequency (UHF) satellite communications (SATCOM) control stations to comply with the new integrated waveform baseline. The upgrade will provide NATO with improved interoperability, scalability and flexibility across legacy and next-generation platforms, according to the company.

August 20, 2019
By George I. Seffers
Air Commodore Elanor Boekholt-O’Sullivan, Royal Netherlands Air Force, speaks about the cyber work force during a panel at AFCEA TechNet Augusta. Photo by Michael Carpenter

Members of an international panel of cyber experts recommend recruiting personnel some might consider misfits in the cyber realm.

June 11, 2019
 

Gen. Tod Wolters, USAF, has been sworn in as commander of U.S. European Command and NATO Supreme Allied Commander, Europe.

May 10, 2019
 

Horizon Technologies announced on May 9 that is would be supporting two major NATO end users by providing the company's FlyingFish Airborne Signals Intelligence (SIGINT) system. The contracts total more than £14 Million over the next few years, according to John Beckner, CEO. “These orders are significant because they include new fixed and rotary-wing platforms as well as new government end users. The units were ordered for immediate delivery and will be used as part of NATO and FRONTEX missions,” he said. The U.K.-based company offers exportable DO-160G airborne-qualified satellite phone SIGINT systems for a wide variety of fixed and rotary-wing aircraft.

April 1, 2019
By Robert K. Ackerman
Soldiers participate in NATO’s multinational live-fire exercise Scorpions Fury 2018 in Romania last November. The alliance has declared cyberspace to be an operational domain on a par with land, sea and air, but it still must develop a policy to integrate cyber operationally with the kinetic effect domains. NATO photo

NATO is taking a comprehensive approach to building a cyber policy that would deter adversaries, defend its member nations and provide key capabilities in multidomain operations. This approach to the alliance’s cyberspace strategy takes into account resilience, counter-cyber activities and operational capabilities in both civilian and military elements.

Yet when it comes to NATO cyber policy, much remains to be established. With 29 member nations all having different needs and different approaches to cyber operations, the alliance has not yet arrived at a fully functional policy. It continues to seek input from its nations while incorporating necessary capabilities amid continuing changes in the cyber domain.

April 1, 2019
By Kimberly Underwood
In preparation for the NATO Trident Juncture 18 exercise, a British Army convoy enters Malmo, Sweden in October after crossing the Oresund Bridge that connects to Denmark. Shared classified “federated” networks used during such exercises are a key allied tool, says Col. Jenniffer Minks, USAF (Ret.), coalition interoperability division chief, Deputy Directorate for Cyber and C4 Integration, Joint Staff J-6. Photo courtesy of NATO

The requirement to partner with allied nations and share a classified network will only grow in the coming years, leaders say. In combined exercises, engagements or missions, coalition partners need to be able to connect digitally to share communications, resources and information to strengthen defenses and partnerships. At the Pentagon, the Joint Staff is working to improve coalition systems and how the U.S. can connect securely to those networks outside of the national networks, one expert shares.

April 1, 2019
By George I. Seffers
Marines train with communications equipment in the village of Hell, Norway, October 14, 2018, as part of Trident Juncture 18, a NATO exercise. Trident Juncture 18 marks the first time NATO is using data science in addition to traditional lessons learned processes following a major training exercise.  Photo By Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Scott R. Jenkins

Trident Juncture 2018, a large-scale NATO military exercise, wrapped up late last year. But in the weeks since, the alliance has been doing something it has never done before by using big data science to help inform lessons learned from the exercise.

April 1, 2019
By Kimberly Underwood
Maj. Gen. Wolfgang Renner (l), GEAF, commander, NATO CIS Group and deputy chief of staff cyberspace, SHAPE, and Col. Donald Lewis, USAF, deputy director, NATO CyOC, discuss the establishment of the alliance’s cyber operations at the CyCon U.S. conference in November 2018.

NATO’s longtime motto says that an attack on one NATO member is considered an attack on all the alliance. Today, this creed also applies to cyberspace, alliance leaders indicate. NATO’s new Cyberspace Operations Center, formed in August 2018, takes up the mantle of defending the alliance in the digital realm.

April 1, 2019
By Lt. Gen. Robert M. Shea, USMC (Ret.)

The phrase, “These are critical times for the NATO alliance,” has been used so often it is almost a cliché. But these times are not defined by a cliché, as the alliance faces multiple challenges within and without. Deliberate discussion has always been the method of determining NATO policy and direction, but the window for that approach is narrowing. NATO must decisively confront several challenges.

December 20, 2018
 

Brig. Gen. Joseph D. McFall, USAF, has been assigned as deputy commander, NATO Mission Iraq, Baghdad, Iraq.

December 20, 2018
 

Brig. Gen. Charles B. McDaniel, USAF, has been assigned as component commander, E3-A, NATO Airborne Early Warning and Control Force, Allied Command Operations, Geilenkirchen, Germany.

October 16, 2018
Posted by Kimberly Underwood
Last week, Canadian Forces Lt. Gen. Christian Juneau, deputy commander of the Allied Joint Force Command in Naples (l); Adm. James Foggo, USN, commander of the Allied Joint Force Command in Naples (c) ;and Lt. Gen. Rune Jakobsen, commander of the Norwegian Joint Headquarters in Bodo, Norway, outline plans for Trident Juncture, one of the largest joint defensive exercise that NATO has ever held.

Between October 25 and November 7, 50,000 military participants from 31 nations will conduct a defensive live exercise in the North Atlantic and Baltic Sea. One of the largest exercises ever, the NATO event, Trident Juncture 18, is meant to ensure that NATO forces “are trained, able to operate together and ready to respond to any threat from any direction,” according to a statement from the alliance.

October 9, 2018
 

Brig. Gen. David M. Hamilton, USA, has been assigned as deputy chief of staff for operations, Allied Rapid Reaction Corps, NATO, United Kingdom.

October 1, 2018
By Lt. Col. Federico Clemente, ESP A, and Cmdr. Stephen Gray, USN
Maj. Matthew Bailey, USA, executive officer, 3rd Squadron, 2d Cavalry Regiment (3/2CR), and 1st Lt. Trevor Rubel, USA, battle captain for the tactical command post, 3/2CR, review an operational overlay on a Nett Warrior device in preparation for an airfield seizure during the NATO Saber Strike 18 exercise in Kazlu Ruda, Lithuania. U.S. Army photo by 1st Lt. Joshua Snell

Technologies are spawning a revolutionary improvement in command and control that will have a transformative impact on how it is conducted at the operational level. These advancements, particularly artificial intelligence, are changing command and control functions such as sensing, processing, “sensemaking” and decision-making. Even greater changes lie ahead as innovation serves a larger role in defining both form and function.

August 28, 2018
 

Lt. Gen. Austin S. Miller, USA, has been nominated for appointment to the grade of general and assignment as commander, Resolute Support Mission, North Atlantic Treaty Organization; and commander, U.S. Forces-Afghanistan. 

July 26, 2018
 

Capt. James A. Kirk, USN, has been selected for promotion to rear admiral and will be assigned as deputy commander/chief of staff, Joint Warfare Center, Allied Command Transformation, Stavanger, Norway.

June 8, 2018
By Maryann Lawlor
NCIA General Manager Kevin Scheid (2nd row, l) and AFCEA Europe General Manager Maj. Gen. Erich Staudacher, GEAF (Ret.), (2nd row, 3rd from r) congratulate the 10 winning participants in the 2018 NITEC Defence Innovation Challenge. Each company had five minutes to present their product to attendees. The competition drew 35 submissions. Photo courtesy of Chuck Helwig

NATO’s power will grow as partnerships between governments and industry combine their strengths to increase security and bring about progress. The challenges nations face are as much about culture and people as they are about finding the right technologies and efficiently introducing them into the networking ecosystem.

More than 600 senior public and private sector leaders met at NITEC18 to learn about emerging capabilities, discuss digital transformation and collaborate to address the challenges NATO is facing today. The event took place in Berlin and was organized by AFCEA International in cooperation with the German Federal Ministry of Defence.

June 7, 2018
 

Brig. Gen. Anthony R. Hale, USA, has been assigned as deputy chief of staff, intelligence, Resolute Support Mission, NATO; and deputy director, operations and support, J-2, U.S. Forces-Afghanistan, Operation Freedom’s Sentinel, Afghanistan.

May 8, 2018
 

Brig. Gen. Daniel R. Walrath, USA, has been assigned as deputy chief of staff, Operations, Resolute Support Mission, North Atlantic Treaty Organization and United States Forces-Afghanistan, Operation Freedom’s Sentinel, Afghanistan.

April 20, 2018
 

Brig. Gen. Phillip A. Stewart, USAF, has been assigned as commander, North Atlantic Treaty Organization Alliance Ground Surveillance Force, Allied Command Operations, NATO, Sigonella, Italy.

April 1, 2018
By Robert K. Ackerman
A Romanian navy helicopter prepares to land on the deck of a frigate during maneuvers by Standing NATO Maritime Group 2 in the Black Sea. The NATO Communications and Information (NCI) Agency is looking toward industry to equip its military and organizational forces with proven technologies that enhance mobile links.

NATO is moving into the digital realm deliberately, avoiding a headlong rush into new technologies, even though it is committed to modernizing its communications and information systems on a large scale. The alliance is incorporating new information technologies without breaking either the bank or speed records by tapping the expertise of others to bring digital benefits to the organization and its forces.

April 1, 2018
By George I. Seffers
Mopic/Shutterstock

NATO and the European Union are improving information sharing on the cyber threat and bolstering collaboration on potential solutions. The two organizations seek to increase the relevance of shared data and are discussing the potential for sharing classified information.

April 1, 2018
By George I. Seffers
NATO  is building a wide range of technological capabilities, including open source intelligence, counterterrorism, artificial intelligence, space-based surveillance, electronic warfare and biometric solutions.

NATO is building a wide range of technological capabilities, including open source intelligence, counterterrorism, artificial intelligence, space-based surveillance, electronic warfare and biometric solutions, some of which were previously left to the individual nations or other international organizations.

The flurry of activity amounts to a complete metamorphosis of NATO’s intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) assets, according to Matt Roper, the joint ISR chief within NATO’s Communications and Information Agency. Roper notes that the alliance’s new direction results directly from the 2012 summit in Chicago.

April 1, 2018
By Kimberly Underwood
The U.S. Army’s 82nd Airborne Division participates in a NATO exercise in Spain. The alliance is adding cyber warfare into its traditional defense operations.

Amid stunning digital attacks that have not only rocked countries around the globe but also targeted alliance forces, NATO is sharpening its resolve to serve as a cyber protector. A forthcoming Cyber Operations Center will incorporate cyber warfare into NATO’s defense operations. In addition, NATO’s Cooperative Cyber Defence Centre of Excellence is boosting the organization’s cybersecurity-related research, exercises and instruction to meet the seemingly unending threats.

April 1, 2018
By Lt. Gen. Robert M. Shea, USMC (Ret.)

As global security becomes more uncertain, NATO only grows in importance to its members. We’ve seen the repeated bad behavior of Russia, the continued chaos of the Middle East, the influence of Iran moving throughout the region and beyond, the increasingly bellicose activity of North Korea, and the ceaseless threat of ISIS all affecting NATO’s strategic interests. The alliance represents a unique set of international political and defense standards, values and norms that form the basis for rules-based order in Western civilization. Further, member nations underpin each other’s economies with dynamic trade and security.

March 22, 2018
By George I. Seffers
A NATO AWACS takes off from Forward Operating Location Ørland in Norway during during a training exercise. This summer’s Unified Vision will allow NATO officials to assess a variety of intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities. Credit: Photo courtesy of NATO E-3A Component Public Affairs Office

When NATO first envisioned a joint intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) capability following a 2012 summit in Chicago, alliance members were not at all sure exactly what that meant, says Matt Roper, the chief of joint ISR within NATO’s Communications and Information Agency.