privacy

November 1, 2019
By Matt Dumiak
Protected data includes any information that can directly or indirectly identify an individual, such as name, driver’s license information, address, passport number, Social Security number and email address.

The California Consumer Privacy Act gives the state’s residents the ability to see and control the personal data companies have, share and sell. The privacy act started as a ballot initiative in early 2018 and was signed into law just a few months later in June. After first-round amendments were approved, the effective date was set as January 1, 2020, with an enforcement of July 1, 2020.

September 26, 2019
By Shaun Waterman
Constitutional law professor Jonathan Turley said biometrics will fundamentally change the way we must think about privacy during his closing keynote at the Federal Identity Forum and Expo. Photo: Shaun Waterman/Signal

Civil libertarians are wrong to fear facial recognition and other biometric identity technologies. But, they will fundamentally change the way we must think about privacy and could have very negative consequences for democracy if not regulated correctly, said constitutional law professor Jonathan Turley, George Washington University, at the AFCEA International Federal Identity Forum and Expo in Tampa, Florida.

Facial recognition “is perfectly suited to blow privacy law to pieces,” Turley told the audience in his closing keynote.

January 1, 2019
By Rand Waltzman
The ability to create a digital alter ego would put control of sharing personal information in an individual’s hand. Artificial intelligence within the device also would warn an owner when data is likely disinformation aimed at influencing behavior. Credit: sdecoret/Shutterstock.com

Up until the digital age, wars involved a limited number of combatants with clear identities battling within distinct boundaries visible on a map. These conflicts ended either with a victor or as a stalemate. But today’s information warfare does not fit this traditional model. Instead, it comprises an unlimited number of potential combatants, many with hidden identities and agendas.

Cyberspace is a theater of operations that is nowhere and everywhere. Within this domain, information warfare will not and in fact cannot come to any conclusion. This conflict closely resembles an incurable disease that can be managed so the patient can lead a productive life but is never completely cured.

August 6, 2018
By Andrew Kelleher
The NSA has had significant, and perhaps surprising, influence on the standards for destroying no-longer-needed data. Credit: PRILL/Shutterstock

Never before has there been such an intense focus on data security and privacy. With data breaches increasing exponentially and the European Union’s recent implementation of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), data security has been at the forefront of news stories over the past several months, with both businesses and consumers suddenly paying very close attention. With this increased attention has come an understanding that data continues to exist even when it is no longer needed or used. Due to this newfound understanding and GDPR’s “Right to be Forgotten,” the eradication of data has new urgency and has become critical to a successful data security program.

May 1, 2018
By Robert K. Ackerman
As an international organization with close ties to Europe, including an office within the European Union, AFCEA complies with the GDPR and has self-certified under the U.S.-EU Privacy Shield agreement. Jim Griggs, AFCEA’s CIO and CTO, believes the association is well-positioned to meet the new regulation as it serves its global membership.

New privacy rules that fall under the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation, which takes effect May 25, could have a global impact both financially and socially. Effects could range from consumer demands for privacy rights trumping private-sector business practices to billions of dollars in lawsuits against commercial data collectors. The consequences are uncertain because the rules themselves are not specific enough to determine parameters for violations and penalties, information officials say.

August 8, 2017
 
Northeastern University is developing a system that will help you plug leaks of your private information.

Northeastern University will develop a system that organizations and individuals can use to audit and control personally identifiable information leaks from connected devices. The research team will investigate how to use machine learning to reliably identify the information in network flows and will develop algorithms that incorporate user feedback to adapt to the constantly changing landscape of privacy leaks.

March 1, 2017
By Maj. Gen. Earl D. Matthews, USAF (Ret.)

Whenever I am notified of yet another data breach, I typically receive a complimentary one-year enrollment in a credit monitoring service. Great, I think. Free is always best! However, the monitoring is truly of little consequence given that my personally identifiable information (PII) has slipped into cyber darkness once again. I feel a sense of disappointment as I think about how much the cyberspace landscape has changed over the last 40-plus years and how little our nation’s privacy laws have done to keep up with this digital transformation. 

September 23, 2015
By Sandra Jontz

The U.S. Department of Commerce's National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) awarded nearly $3.7 million for three pilot projects that seek to fortify online financial transactions and enhance privacy protections for health care, government services, transportation and the Internet of Things.

The studies, awarded by the agency's National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace (NSTIC) office, address specific cyber-based missions such as reducing tax refund theft, ensuring better protections of medical information, devising mobile ticketing solutions for use on mass transit and providing secure online data storage, according the agency.

January 30, 2015
By Maryann Lawlor

In the days before digital, paper was the medium. To apply for a job, see a doctor, buy a refrigerator or get a loan, we filled out forms. These forms were then filed in a cabinet and, for the most part, forgotten. Privacy matters were a matter of how tenacious someone was about digging through piles of paper.

But the dawn of the digital age required a willingness to give up a bit of that privacy. We signed up for a few conveniences, like providing an email address, so we could send flowers or make a plane reservation via the Internet faster.

July 31, 2012
By Rachel Eisenhower

Encrypt tweets and send them to select groups or individuals with the scrambls app for the iPhone or iPad. The app gives you total control over your online privacy on Twitter. Simply tap tweets to instantly encrypt the text before it is sent to the cloud. Only select individuals defined at scrambls.com can read the posts. Your selected contacts need the app or the browser plug-in, and they will see the scrambled posts as clear text. Just change the group or individuals permitted to read a post based on the level of privacy you want to achieve.