ransomware

May 13, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
Making ransom payments in cyber attacks only fuels the business model of malicious actors, warns the acting director of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, Brandon Wales, speaking to reporters on May 13.

The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, or CISA, the nation’s lead federal agency for protecting government networks and critical infrastructure against cybersecurity threats, reminded agencies and the private sector not to succumb to paying ransoms in cyber attacks and to take much greater steps to shore up any vulnerabilities. “As last week’s ransomware attack against the Colonial Pipeline and recent intrusions impacting federal agencies demonstrate, our nation faces constant cyber threats from nation states and criminal groups alike,” said Brandon Wales, CISA’s acting director in a May 13 statement. 

March 23, 2021
 

With ransomware and malware attacks on the rise across the globe, leaders need to be positioned for incident response before a breach occurs. Most businesses are not prepared for the earth-splitting impact a ransomware attack will present to their organization. Many organizations are deploying the “HOPE” strategy against ransomware. They hope every day that they aren’t targeted, because they know a ransomware attack will present a monumental financial and organizational challenge. Commercial businesses have paid hundreds of millions of dollars to black hat hackers for the rights to the decryption key to restore their network. Ransomware can shut down computers and lock out users until they pay hackers a ransom.

March 1, 2018
By Bridgit Griffin
Photo Credit: Mopic/vs148/Shutterstock

The military tackles many challenges in its cyber ecosystem—a diverse group of human users, processes and technologies and their interactions—by striving for uniformity across its hardware, software and operating systems. But standardization also can create large holes in the cyber environment, weakening defenses and contributing to successful cyber attacks. Coming at cybersecurity from a different angle could leverage differences in favor of network defenders.

Without a doubt, system consistency has its benefits. Using the same operating systems, applications, switches, routers and other components across networks reduces complexity and lowers the cost of equipment maintenance as well as defense.

February 1, 2018
By Nicola Whiting
Credit: Mopic/Issarawat Tattong/Shutterstock

Advances in automated cyber weapons are fueling the fires of war in cyberspace and enabling criminals and malicious nation-states to launch devastating attacks against thinly stretched human defenses. Allied forces must collaborate and deploy best-of-breed evaluation, validation and remediation technologies just to remain even in an escalating cyber arms race.

July 1, 2017
By Maj. Gen. Earl D. Matthews, USAF (Ret.)

In business as in life, whenever something goes terribly wrong, there is a reflexive tendency to start talking about what should have been done and to affix blame instead of focusing on how to move forward successfully. Cyber attacks are certainly no exception.

I simply WannaCry.

June 27, 2017
By Sandra Jontz

Governments, banks, transportation systems and critical infrastructure entities reeled Tuesday from yet another wide-sweeping disruptive cyber attack—one that echoed the WannaCry breach in May but is potentially far more crippling.

Cyber experts began bracing for the effects of a massive attack that hit Ukraine first, and then rippled throughout other European nations before going global.

May 6, 2016
By Sandra Jontz
Intelligence and cybersecurity experts discuss emerging cyber threats at an AFCEA EPIC presentation, with growing concern over wearables and the Internet of Things.

Should private companies be able to—and maybe more importantly—hack back? 

The question drew enthusiastic responses from panelists and the audience during at presentation Thursday by AFCEA’s Emerging Professionals in Intelligence Committee (EPIC) on intelligence and cybersecurity.  

February 22, 2016
By Sandra Jontz

Last year proved lucrative for cyber criminals, and 2016 is shaping up to be even better, with a seemingly unsuspecting victim in the hacking crosshairs: driverless cars, according to Dell Security. In 2015, hackers carried out a massive number of breaches against organizations and government agencies in spite of the millions of dollars spent not only to safeguard networks, but also to hire security experts and train employees on proper cyber hygiene, according to the company’s annual cybersecurity report released Monday.