research and development

January 1, 2013
By George I. Seffers
The Texas Advanced Computing Center has supported research to develop next-generation hurricane models. Environmental science and technology is one area of research that could benefit from big data initiatives.

A multi-agency big data initiative offers an array of national advantages.

U.S. government agencies will award a flurry of contracts in the coming months under the Big Data Research and Development Initiative, a massive undertaking involving multiple agencies and $200 million in commitments. The initiative is designed to unleash the power of the extensive amounts of data generated on a daily basis. The ultimate benefit, experts say, could transform scientific research, lead to the development of new commercial technologies, boost the economy and improve education, all of which makes the United States more competitive with other nations and enhances national security.

December 1, 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman
This experimental antenna developed by LGS Innovations mimics a spherical antenna by arraying circuit boards bearing printed structures. Without having a series of electrical connections, the boards nonetheless resonate as if the construct was a spherical antenna.

Scientists bend, not break, the laws of physics.

Faced with limitations imposed by physics, laboratory researchers are generating antenna innovations by tweaking constructs to change the rules of the antenna game. Their efforts do not seek to violate long-held mathematical theorems or laws of physics. Instead, they are working to find lawful ways of working around limitations that long have inhibited the development of antennas that would suit user needs with fewer tradeoffs.

December 1, 2012
By George I. Seffers
Three 100-foot towers at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, provide the Air Force Research Laboratory Sensors Directorate with new capabilities to perform radar research. The actual radars atop each tower were relocated from Rome, N.Y., as part of the 2005 Base Realignment and Closure.

U.S. Air Force researchers use 3-D printers and
 other cutting-edge concepts 
to create
 the next 
innovations.

There is no Moore’s Law for antennas because size reduction and performance improvement will always be subject to the limitations imposed by electromagnetic physics and material properties. But steady advances in computer technologies, such as electromagnetic modeling and simulation and 3-D printing, enable antenna technology researchers to push the limits of possibility on behalf of the warfighters.

October 1, 2012
By Max Cacas

A new computing architecture emphasizes shared resources.

The nation’s intelligence community has embarked on a path toward a common computer desktop and a cloud computing environment designed to facilitate both timely sharing of information and cost savings. The implementation could result in budget savings of 20 to 25 percent over existing information technology spending within six years, but the ramifications could include large cultural changes that result both in lost jobs and business for industry partners.

October 1, 2012
By Max Cacas

The National Intelligence University prepares for its fifth decade with a shift in focus and a change in venue.

The National Intelligence University, which provides advanced training to U.S. intelligence professionals, is transitioning from an institution primarily focused on the U.S. Defense Department to one serving the entire intelligence community. This reflects the new emphasis toward sharing and collaboration within the nation's intelligence apparatus.

September 21, 2012
By Rita Boland

 

The U.S. Defense Department has some hard decisions to make regarding where and how to optimize future research to counter chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) weapons. A new report outlines the challenges that military officials must tackle with department and other partners, warning that the amorphous nature of threats limits the ability to identify or mitigate them all individually.

November 2010
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

Tuesday, February 02, 2010
By Rita Boland

August 17, 2009
By Rita Boland

 

Dr. Jennifer Murphy, IED-2 program manager and research psychologist with the Army Research Institute,
demonstrates one of the tests her joint team of researchers used to determine the characteristics of troops who might have exceptional abilities at detecting improved explosive devices (IEDs).

June 2009
By Rita Boland and Maryann Lawlor

June 2009
By Henry S. Kenyon

June 2009
By Henry S. Kenyon

 

Researchers working with the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research have developed a method to spray down a film of carbon nanotubes to form thin, flexible electronics. These pliable circuits will be applied to a variety of soft materials such as cloth and plastic.

December 2008
By Maryann Lawlor

November 2007
By Henry S. Kenyon

December 2006
By Rita Boland

December 2006
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The Synthetic Aperture Ladar for Tactical Imaging (SALTI) program is studying practical applications for synthetic aperture ladar (SAL) technology. Unlike synthetic aperture radar, which requires trained personnel to interpret data, SAL can produce photo-realistic images.
Airborne light-based system delivers more detail, high data rates.

December 2006
By Henry S. Kenyon

December 2006
By Robert K. Ackerman

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