signals intelligence

October 9, 2019
 

L-3 Communications Integrated Systems L.P., Greenville, Texas, has been awarded a $48,976,531 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for Advanced Exploitation of Electronic Intelligence Signals software/hardware. This contract provides for improved detection, collection, characterization and reporting accuracy of emerging emitters, and improved reporting timeliness; improved classification of signal feature characteristics; and research, development and demonstration of technologies and algorithms for automatic detection, measurement, processing and exploitation of radio frequency emissions.  Work will be performed at Greenville, Texas, and is expected to be completed by September 2024. This award is the result of a competitive acquisition and two

August 23, 2019
By George I. Seffers
The Multi-Function Electronic Warfare-Air Large program will integrate an offensive electronic warfare pod onto an MQ-1C Gray Eagle unmanned aircraft system. It, along with two other programs, offers the Army an opportunity for interoperability. Credit: U.S. Army

The U.S. Army is enjoying a renaissance period for cyber and electronic warfare (EW) technologies and has a chance to lay a foundation of interoperability in cyber systems, says Col. Kevin Finch, USA, program manager for electronic warfare and cyber within the Program Executive Office-Intelligence, Electronic Warfare and Sensors.

Col. Finch made the comments on the final day of the AFCEA TechNet Augusta conference 2019 in Augusta, Georgia. AFCEA added an extra day to the annual conference to highlight procurement and acquisition.

April 12, 2019
By Kimberly Underwood
Col. Dave Burton, USMC, program manager, Intelligence Systems, USMC Systems Command, notes that organizational changes are helping the Marines bring forth signals intelligence capabilities.

In an era of complex geopolitics of peer and near-peer adversaries racing to advance electronic warfare (EW), the U.S. Marine Corps, like the other services, is centering on improving its signals intelligence (SIGINT) and electronic warfare operations. The service is examining its training and how it integrates the capabilities into its battalions. 

The Marine Corps’ efforts in so-called SIGINT and EW was the focus of this year’s Signals Intelligence Day held on Capitol Hill and organized by the Association of Old Crows Advocacy’s Signals Intelligence Industry Partnership. 

November 1, 2018
By Kimberly Underwood
Metadata from communication signals can provide a nonencrypted source of signals intelligence, says David Stupples, professor, School of Mathematics, Computer Science and Engineering, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, City, University of London.  Shutterstock/Sutham

Data from mobile device signals such as GSM may be an untapped resource for signals intelligence on the battlefield. Although the payload of a communication system is encoded, information about the nature of the communication that is included in the GSM signal is not and should not be overlooked. This information, known as metadata, could prove to be an important tool for warfighters, experts say.

August 13, 2018
Posted by Kimberly Underwood
China has a significant military presence in the South China Sea that is supported by “unprecedented" levels of signals intelligence activity, says David Stupples, professor of electronic and radio systems, City, University of London. Graphic Credit: David Rosenberg, Middlebury College (www.southchinasea.org).

For the last decade, “informatization” of its national civilian and military infrastructure has been a top priority for the People’s Republic of China. The country’s efforts to become a global power in information and communications technology include a focus on signals intelligence. Out of its $150 billion total defense budget, the country is spending an estimated $15 billion on signals intelligence, said David Stupples, professor of electronic and radio systems, City, University of London, at an August 9 Association of Old Crows (AOC) online event.

May 1, 2016
By Julianne Simpson

This is the third in a series of interviews with signaleers, one for each of SIGNAL Magazine's seven decades, to commemorate the 70th anniversary of AFCEA International.

1986-1995

When David Baciocco began flying planes for the Navy aboard the USS Nimitz in 1987, satellite communications did not exist on aircraft. Instead he employed line of sight and high frequency, push-to-talk communications to complete missions.

January 28, 2016
By Shawn Snow
An A-29 Super Tucano drops a bomb.

At the height of combat missions in Afghanistan, the U.S. military occupied nearly 825 military outposts throughout the war-ravaged region. That number now stands at roughly 20. The outposts served an extensive intelligence-gathering network, using surveillance balloons and wide-range signals intelligence collection operations. The rapid drawdown of these facilities following the withdrawal of U.S. and NATO forces from the region created a black hole of information, with Afghan forces struggling to fill the gap. 

June 10, 2013
George I. Seffers

 
Zeta Associates Inc., Fairfax, Va., was awarded a cost-plus-fixed-fee with a maximum value of $28,500,000 for the upgrade and production of Guardian Eagle X-Midas V3 systems and related services. The Army Contracting Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., is the contracting activity.

May 18, 2011
By George Seffers

Northrop Grumman Intelligence Systems, Chantilly, Virginia, is being awarded a greater than $9 million contract modification to extend the Airborne Signals Intelligence Payload (ASIP) baseline contract to support the ASIP post-initial operational test and evaluation flight testing on the Global Hawk platform. Aeronautical Systems Center, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, is the contracting activity.