TechNet Asia-Pacific 2017

January 1, 2018
By Beverly Cooper
Resilience is an enabler, but it is not just one thing. It involves making progress with redundancy, sensors, computing capacity, bandwidth and connectivity, says Brig. Gen. Paul H. Fredenburgh III, USA, director, Command, Control, Communications and Cyber (C4), PACOM (r), in a panel discussion exploring international issues.

Mission assurance and resilience can be interpreted differently, but having relevant tools and capabilities, developing solid multilateral partnerships and employing a trained work force are critical requirements for meeting many mission objectives. Equally important is the ability to convert data into actionable knowledge to support decision making in a way that can respond flexibly in a variety of scenarios.

November 3, 2017
 

Mission assurance and resilience can be interpreted differently, but having the tools, capabilities, partnerships and skilled work force that can respond to a variety of scenarios in a flexible manner is the ultimate goal. 

The solutions possible in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region are as varied as the challenges, and the speakers at TechNet-Asia Pacific were cautiously optimistic because of the tools they have. But they also emphasized that the United States needs to rely on much more than technical prowess. The human factor is equally important.

November 3, 2017
By Beverly Cooper
Rear Adm. Matthew J. Carter, USN, deputy commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet discusses resiliency at TechNet Asia-Pacific.

The cyber domain consists of servers, undersea cables, satellite and wireless networks that link global communications. This allows accelerated technical change that we can use to our advantage, stated Rear Adm. Matthew J. Carter, USN, deputy commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet. However, the low-cost entry to access the same technology the military uses leaves open the possibility for embedded attacks on the technology we depend on, he added while speaking at AFCEA TechNet Asia-Pacific
 

November 2, 2017
By Beverly Cooper
Reliance on C4 capabilities demands resiliency and cybersecurity baked into all aspects of system operations, bringing confidence in resilient communications to the warfighter. Speaking on a panel that addressed this topic were, l to r: Col. Jay Matos, USMC; Col. Joseph E. Delaney, USMC; Brig. Gen. Paul H. Fredenburgh III, USA;  Brig. Gen. Stephen C. Williams, USAF; and Col. James D. (Jim) Turinetti, IV, USA. Also on the panel was James Williams.

Technology is rapidly changing, providing opportunities as well as challenges. The military must be prepared to use the technology and understand the implications of the new technologies both in their hands and in the hands of the adversaries. “If we don’t incorporate the threat that we are going to face, we will be shooting at the wrong duck," said Brig. Gen. Paul H. Fredenburgh III, USA, director, Command, Control, Communications and Cyber (C4), U.S. Pacific Command, leading a panel on cyber resilience and assured command and control at AFCEA TechNet Asia-Pacific

November 2, 2017
By Beverly Cooper
Panelists discuss the need for cybersecurity internationally during TechNet Asia-Pacific.

It is essential to learn from cyber attacks conducted by state and nonstate actors to define resilience for cybersecurity or cyber terrorism. "We need to develop a threat model for cyber resilience. We have to be prudent to distinguish between cyber warfare and cyber terrorism," said Anita T. Abbott, Ph.D., director, adjunct professor, Global Partnership and Development Ltd., during the TechNet Asia-Pacific conference.

November 2, 2017
By Beverly Cooper
Leadership will be challenged to manage and communicate differently with work force of the future, said TechNet Asia-Pacific panelists, l-r: Master Sgt. Brandon T. Cruz, USAF; John C. Adams; Capt. Herman L. Archibald, USN; Sam M.P. Sneed, director, ES&, Inc.; and Jeffrey T. Jacoby.

Technology is rapidly expanding, and as a result, we must deal with changes in our organizations as well as in our personal communications. Master Sgt. Brandon T. Cruz, USAF, chief, Standardization and Evaluations, 690th Cyberspace Operations Squadron, Joint-Base Pearl Harbor–Hickam, led a panel at AFCEA Technet Asia-Pacific that looked at the cultural as well as organizational differences that occur in a hiring market where there are more jobs than skilled workers to fill them. 

November 1, 2017
By Beverly Cooper
Tools that help the big data problem are one of the technologies most desired in the cyber realm, according to panelists at AFCEA TechNet Asia-Pacific., l-r: Maj Gen. Jeffrey A. Kruse, USAF; Capt. Dale C. Rielage, USN; Lt. Col. Ed Guevara, USAF; Col. Pete Don, USA; and Col. Matt Rau, USMC.

In today’s big data environments, it is not that “we don’t know what we don’t know.” It is actually “we don’t know what we do know,” according to Col. Pete Don, USA, deputy senior intelligence officer for intelligence operations, U.S. Army Pacific. “We are being dazzled with so much data that it is hard to focus and find the needle in the haystack." The net seizes our attention only to scatter it, he contends. Col. Don joined three other colleagues as part of a panel on cybersecurity intelligence at TechNet Asia-Pacific

November 1, 2017
By Beverly Cooper
Lt. Gen. Bryan P. Fenton, USA, deputy commander, U.S. Pacific Command, discusses military challenges and opportunities in the Asia-Pacific region at TechNet Asia-Pacific.

In the surfing community, a wave of consequence is one that is impactful and takes a commitment to get in to it. “But when you put that commitment into the wave, it makes a difference,” said Lt. Gen. Bryan P. Fenton, USA, deputy commander, U.S. Pacific Command, who explained that he needs strong industry partnerships to help make a difference.

October 31, 2017
By Beverly Cooper
Terry Halvorsen of Samsung Electronics addresses the crowd at TechNet Asia-Pacific.

Data, in the world of Terry Halvorsen, is more like milk than wine. It does not get better with age, and if you leave it out too long, it will spoil. Halvorsen is chief information officer and executive vice president IT and Mobile Communication B2B Business, Samsung Electronics. “We are keeping and storing vast amounts of data that does not do anything for us," he explained during his keynote address at AFCEA TechNet Asia-Pacific.

You often hear that storage is cheap, but all that stored data has an impact on the speed of the data you want. It makes it harder to find the data you want or to aggregate it in a meaningful way. 

November 1, 2017
By Beverly Cooper
A group of dynamic and successful women leaders gathered to help advance educational topics during AFCEA TechNet Asia-Pacific. From l to r: Cindy Moran, Jodi Ito, Col. Claire Cuccio, USA, and Miyi Chung.

Self study, find a mentor, be confident with your knowledge, network and don’t be intimidated. These were some of the recommendations for women offered by female leaders on the Education and Future Technologies Panel at Technet Asia-Pacific. The panel was moderated by Linda Newton, AFCEA Hawaii Educational Foundation.

You have to stay current, or you become stale, said Cindy Moran, president and managing partner, Pikes Way LLC, who acknowledged that the reason she became an executive was because she was tired of being told what to do and not having input. “It wasn’t about power,” she added.

November 1, 2017
By Beverly Cooper
Culture and technology intersect in many ways, and a panel at AFCEA TechNet Asia-Pacific discussed some of the issues that result, from l-r: Rear Adm. Patrick Piercey, USN; Candy Green, Will Bates and Air Commodore Phillip Champion, RAAF.

Information technology’s impact on our culture is far deeper and more profound than many realize. While the technologies we have at our fingertips make many things easier, they also blur the distinction between right and wrong, especially for younger generations.

Will Bates, supervisory special agent, FBI Honolulu Cyber Squad, stated that the age of cyber crime suspects keeps going down. “It is easy to conduct the intrusions, and often parents have not emphasized that accessing things online without authorization is also wrong. Bates joined three others on a panel that looked at cultural aspects of technological advances.

October 31, 2017
By Beverly Cooper
Industry leaders took on the tough topic of cybersecurity and mission assurance at AFCEA TechNet Asia Pacific, l-r: Adm. Richard Macke, USN (Ret.); Douglas Booth, Lockheed Martin; Chris Smith, At&T; Earl Matthews, DXC Technology; Ward Heinke, ForcePoint; and John Merlino, Axis Communications.

Cyber defense and mission assurance require technology solutions, but it is equally important to go beyond the access point and look at user behavior. Ward Heinke, vice president, strategic alliances, Government Markets, ForcePoint, started off the industry panel at TechNet Asia-Pacific with that point. He admitted it is not news about the human threat, or that the threat ranges from innocent mistakes to strategic attacks,but we are seeing the real life effects at an increasing rate he warned.