unmanned aerial systems

February 3, 2021
By George I. Seffers
Military officials intend to counter-drone systems twice a year, with the first demonstration taking place in April, and fielding the first systems next year. Credit: Andrey_Popov/Shutterstock

The U.S. military should begin fielding low-cost, low-collateral counter-drone systems as early as next year, officials told reporters in a February 2 conference call.

The Army has been designated the lead service for deploying systems to counter small unmanned aerial system (C-sUAS) technologies across the department. The service recently released its C-sUAS strategy . The strategy provides the framework for addressing sUAS hazards and threats in a variety of operating environments, including the U.S. homeland, host nations and contingency locations.

January 7, 2021
Posted by: George I. Seffers
Caption: The U.S. Defense Department has released a new strategy for countering the proliferation of small unmanned aerial systems. The strategy is designed to provide the framework for addressing the threat to within the United States and internationally. Credit: Lobachad/Shutterstock

The U.S. Defense Department released today its strategy for countering small unmanned aircraft systems, which have become a growing threat both for the homeland and abroad.

September 1, 2020
By George I. Seffers
Unmanned aircraft have proved immensely valuable to the military and to intelligence agencies, but they are sometimes too noisy for stealthy reconnaissance. The Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity is developing a silent and miniature aerial drone known as the Little Horned Owl. Credit: U.S. Defense Department photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Jeffrey S. Viano, U.S. Navy

The cloud computing infrastructure at the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity allowed the organization to pivot to a new teleworking norm during the pandemic that’s not much different than the old norm. The organization has conducted business as usual, hiring program managers, adding office directors, creating and killing programs, and continuing to meet the intelligence community’s technology needs.

Catherine Marsh, director of the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity, known as IARPA, was told on March 12 to “lean forward,” and she did, allowing almost the entire staff to telecommute beginning the next day. Even contractors work from home legally, securely and effectively.

August 25, 2020
Posted by: George I. Seffers
The X-61A unmanned aerial system successfully completed its second series of flight tests in July. The system is being developed by a Dynetics-led team under the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's Gremlins program. Photo courtesy of DARPA

DARPA’s Gremlins program is targeting additional tests of the X-61A vehicle later this year after meeting several primary objectives during risk reduction flights at the U.S. Army’s Dugway Proving Ground in Utah in late July. The Gremlins program seeks to develop and demonstrate air launch and air recovery of up to four unmanned aerial systems (UASs), known as Gremlins Air Vehicles, within 30 minutes.

July 15, 2019
Posted by: George I. Seffers
Using the Army’s cyber-enabled Counter-Unmanned Aerial System, soldiers were able to detect and counter small drones during training. Credit: U.S. Army

Soldiers with the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division (3/1 CD) recently tried out a cyber-based prototype that complements electronic warfare systems designed to combat enemy drones, the Army has revealed in an online article.

Using the Army's enhanced cyber-enabled Counter-Unmanned Aerial System (C-UAS) capability, soldiers were able to detect and counter common, small drones during their training. The new prototype alerted soldiers to the presence of a drone and provided a means to target it, for protection across the brigade.

March 16, 2017
 
DARPA’s Gremlins program seeks to develop innovative technologies and systems that would enable aircraft to launch volleys of low-cost, reusable unmanned aerial systems and safely and reliably retrieve them in midair.

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) recently completed phase 1 of its Gremlins program, which envisions volleys of low-cost, reusable unmanned aerial systems (UASs)—or “gremlins”—that could be launched and later retrieved in midair. Taking the program to its next stage, the agency has awarded phase 2 contracts to two teams, one led by Dynetics Inc., Huntsville, Alabama, and the other by General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Inc., San Diego.

December 1, 2016
By Sandra Jontz
U.S. troops conduct a so-called “jump test” of a new capability. Here they evaluate the Hughes HM300 portable X-band satellite terminal used for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance.

The U.S. Navy’s investment in its own fleet of high-altitude, long-range unmanned aerial systems called Tritons marks a detour from the military’s longtime use of satellite technology to connect its arsenal of big platforms such as Global Hawks and Predators. 

May 30, 2014
 

AAI Corp, Hunt Valley, Maryland, was awarded a $75,010,510 cost-plus-fixed fee contract to support the Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center, Software Engineering Directorate's Joint System Integration Laboratory for technology integration into the contractor's fleet of unmanned aircraft systems, including the Shadow, and associated ground support equipment to allow the demonstration of enhanced or improved UAS platform, payload, and ground systems performance. Army Contracting Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama is the contracting activity (W31P4Q-14-D-0020).

November 30, 2011
By George Seffers

Insitu Incorporated, Bingen, Washington, is being awarded an $11,994,145 modification to a previously awarded firm-fixed-price contract to exercise an option for operational and maintenance services in support of the ScanEagle Unmanned Aerial Systems. These services will provide electro-optical/infrared and mid-wave infrared imagery in support of U.S. Marine Corps operations in Operation Enduring Freedom to provide real-time imagery and data. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity.

September 29, 2011
By George Seffers

Wyle Laboratories Incorporated, Huntsville, Alabama, has recently been awarded several contracts. The first is a $49,181,949 cost-plus-fixed-fee, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity requirements contract to provide research and analysis to replace existing handheld biometrics, which currently lack the required reliability, quality, and supportability. Research will provide biometric system assessments, technology, and architecture enhancements, and prototype development to enable information fusion. Specific deliverables include: analysis of alternatives, configuration analysis, sensitive site exploitation, and tagging/tracking location reports.

July 8, 2011
By George Seffers

Lockheed Martin, Mission System and Sensors, Owego, New York, was awarded a $47 million contract to provide autonomous technologies for unmanned aerial systems to maximize performance requirements and capabilities with mature technologies. The U.S. Army Contracting Command, Fort Eustis, Virginia, is the contracting activity.