White House

September 14, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
Chris Inglis, national cyber director, discusses cybersecurity challenges with Suzanne Kelly, CEO and publisher, The Cipher Brief, at the 2021 Intelligence and National Security Summit.

Eight weeks on the job, the national cyber director, Chris Inglis, is examining the confines of how to approach the cyber adversaries and nation states conducting malicious attacks on the U.S. government, critical infrastructure and private sector. The former deputy director of the National Security Agency and a member of that agency for 28 years, Inglis sees how the Russian government is not taking any action against perpetrators.

May 13, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
The new cybersecurity executive order from the White House calls for the federal government’s increased use of multifactor authentication, encryption, endpoint detection response, breach logging, zero-trust architecture and cloud computing, according to a senior administration official. Credit: Shutterstock/Andrea Izzotti

In an effort to increase critical infrastructure cybersecurity and better protect federal networks, President Joseph Biden signed an executive order on May 12. It includes provisions to improve information sharing between industry and the U.S. government, overhaul federal cybersecurity standards, spur the further use of cloud computing and zero trust architecture, and mandate the use of multifactor authentication and encryption. Amongst other measures, the executive order establishes a Cybersecurity Safety Review Board that would dissect a significant cyber incident and make recommendations for action.

July 31, 2019
 

McLean, Virginia-based Capgemini announced on July 31 that it would be supporting the government’s information technology (IT) modernization efforts. The General Services Administration (GSA) awarded the company a contract under a new multiple-award blanket purchase agreement (BPA), the Centers of Excellence Discovery and Assessment BPA for Cloud Adoption and IT Infrastructure Optimization.

May 8, 2018
By Seli Agbolosu-Amison
Four policies give government agencies they flexibility and authority to limit cyber risks. Credit: katielwhite91/Pixabay

As a result of recent federal legislative and administrative activity, government agencies are expected to launch significant modernizations of their cybersecurity systems, get offensive with hackers and take a more strategic approach to risk. Combined, these policy directives promise to transform our government into a robust digital society, gaining greater resiliency to cyber threats by leveraging opportunities while reinforcing standards and procedures.

Here’s a breakdown of the key components of the four policies:

October 12, 2017
By John Gilligan

The lines between nation-state and criminal cyber attacks are blurring, and the pace of their onslaughts is increasing geometrically as everyone from private citizens to secure government organizations is targeted. Most importantly, there is no one-size-fits-all approach to either cybersecurity or threat intelligence. Each aspect must be tailored to the threat and the threatened.

Many of these points were brought forward in an AFCEA classified cyber forum earlier this year. Addressing the theme of “Evolving Cyber Threat Intelligence, Means, Methods and Motives,” the forum generated some valuable unclassified observations and conclusions relevant to dealing with today’s cyberthreat.

March 16, 2017
By Sandra Jontz
White House homeland security adviser Thomas Bossert has a discussion on the White House's cybersecurity plans with his former boss, Frances Townsend, during a CSIS event. Photo courtesy CSIS

The White House’s first federal budget blueprint unveiled Thursday seeks to fund the nation’s cybersecurity efforts by boosting budgets of the U.S. Defense Department and Department of Homeland Security—an initiative officials say will guard against the magnified threat landscape that is only getting worse. 

January 1, 2017
By George I. Seffers
The Secret Service’s chief information officer (CIO) says his highest priority is to provide the technology support to allow agents and uniformed division officers to complete their mission. That includes moving toward a more mobile environment.

The U.S. Secret Service is putting into place its first-ever cyber and information technology strategic plan, which provides a path forward through 2021. Among other goals, the plan calls for the agency to build a world-class network operations security center and to continue the march toward greater mobility for special agents and uniformed officers. 

February 9, 2016
By Sandra Jontz and George I. Seffers

President Barack Obama championed cybersecurity efforts Tuesday in seeking $19 billion for the cause as part of his fiscal year 2017 budget proposal. Additionally, he signed two executive orders to seek to strengthen government networks against cyber attacks while protecting personal information.

The budget proposal for FY17, which begins October 1, is a 35 percent increase over the current fiscal year.